Nature Animals humankind
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Nature Animals humankind
~ The truth is extreme. To make it moderate is to lie ~ I never saw you, but I know you. I never touched you, but I feel you. I never met you, but I miss you. I know you're gone, but I won't forget you. I couldn't save you, but I fought for you. I am an Animal Defender and always will be...
Curated by Patrice H.
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Rescooped by Patrice H. from Geography Education
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When Climate Change Meets Sprawl: Why Houston's ‘Once-In-A-Lifetime' Floods Keep Happening

When Climate Change Meets Sprawl: Why Houston's ‘Once-In-A-Lifetime' Floods Keep Happening | Nature Animals humankind | Scoop.it

"Unchecked development remains a priority in the famously un-zoned city, creating short-term economic gains for some, but long term flood risk for everyone."


Via Seth Dixon
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Ken Feltman's curator insight, September 13, 9:43 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: Houston's development boom and reduction of wetlands leave region prone to more severe flooding.  Here is a great map of the change in impervious surfaces in the region from 1940 to 2017--when you combine that with record-breaking rainfall the results are catastrophic.  But a local understanding of place is critical and this viral post--Things non-Houstonians Need to Understand--is pretty good.        
Tiffany Cooper's curator insight, September 26, 11:11 AM
#geo130
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, October 31, 1:27 PM

Un dossier sur les inondations à Houston (en anglais). La présentation est très originale.

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What Could Disappear?

What Could Disappear? | Nature Animals humankind | Scoop.it
Coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded in three levels of higher seas.

 

This interactive feature is designed to answer a simple, yet profound set of questions.  What areas (in over 20 cities around the U.S.) would be under water if the ocean levels rose 5 feet?  12 feet?  25 feet?  The following set of maps show "coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded without engineered protection." 


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Mary Rack's comment, November 26, 2012 8:03 AM
especially good!