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España incumple la normativa europea más importante de protección de la biodiversidad

España incumple la normativa europea más importante de protección de la biodiversidad | Natural Sciences | Scoop.it
La ONG ha denunciado que, tras dos años de retraso en la obligación de aprobar los...
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Could planting trees in the desert mitigate climate change | TerraDaily.com

Could planting trees in the desert mitigate climate change | TerraDaily.com | Natural Sciences | Scoop.it

As the world starts feeling the effects of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide and consequent global temperature rise, researchers are looking for a Plan B to mitigate climate change. A group of German scientists has now come up with an environmentally friendly method that they say could do just that. The technique, dubbed carbon farming, consists in planting trees in arid regions on a large scale to capture CO2. They publish their study in Earth System Dynamics, a journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU).

 

"Carbon farming addresses the root source of climate change: the emission of carbon dioxide by human activities," says first-author Klaus Becker of the University of Hohenheim in Stuttgart.

 

"Nature does it better," adds Becker's colleague Volker Wulfmeyer, "if we understand and can make use of it in a sustainable manner."

 

When it comes to sequestering carbon from the atmosphere, the team shows that Jatropha curcas does it better. This small tree is very resistant to aridity so it can be planted in hot and dry land in soil unsuitable for food production. The plant does need water to grow though, so coastal areas where desalinated seawater can be made available are ideal.

 

"To our knowledge, this is the first time experts in irrigation, desalination, carbon sequestration, economics and atmospheric sciences have come together to analyse the feasibility of a large-scale plantation to capture carbon dioxide in a comprehensive manner. We did this by applying a series of computer models and using data from Jatropha curcas plantations in Egypt, India and Madagascar," says Wulfmeyer.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Amenaza para los puntos calientes de biodiversidad

Amenaza para los puntos calientes de biodiversidad | Natural Sciences | Scoop.it
La fauna tropical será la más afectada por el aumento de las temperaturas.
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Indigenous peoples at forefront of climate change offer lessons on plant biodiversity

Indigenous peoples at forefront of climate change offer lessons on plant biodiversity | Natural Sciences | Scoop.it

Humans are frequently blamed for deforestation and the destruction of environments, yet there are also examples of peoples and cultures around the world that have learned to manage and conserve the precious resources around them. The Yanesha of the upper Peruvian Amazon and the Tibetans of the Himalayas are two groups of indigenous peoples carrying on traditional ways of life, even in the face of rapid environmental changes. Over the last 40 years, Dr. Jan Salick, senior curator and ethnobotanist with the William L. Brown Center of the Missouri Botanical Garden has worked with these two cultures.

 

She explains how their traditional knowledge and practices hold the key to conserving, managing and even creating new biodiversity in a paper released in the new text, "Biodiversity in Agriculture: Domestication, Evolution, and Sustainability," published by Cambridge University Press.

 

The Yanesha and Tibetans are dramatically different peoples living in radically dissimilar environments, but both cultures utilize and highly value plant biodiversity for their food, shelters, clothing and medicines.

 

"Both cultures use traditional knowledge to create, manage and conserve this biodiversity, and both are learning to adapt to and mitigate the effects of climate change," said Salick. "They have much to teach and to offer the world if we can successfully learn to integrate science and traditional knowledge.


Via Ashish Umre
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