Natural Disasters
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Why Scientists Were Wrong About This Year's Hurricane Season - National Geographic

Why Scientists Were Wrong About This Year's Hurricane Season - National Geographic | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
National Geographic Why Scientists Were Wrong About This Year's Hurricane Season National Geographic Hurricanes and tropical storms draw their energy from warm, moist air and seawater that has been heated to at least 80 degrees Fahrenheit (27...
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Jazz VanHemert's comment, September 26, 2013 11:18 PM
Because of the very dry air over the Atlantic Ocean has kept the 2013 hurricane season from being the stormy summer that forecasters expected it to be. In my opinion this article shows that even with all the advanced technology and things to predict the weather and natural disasters, there is no for sure way to predict what will happen. If we don't know when natural disasters like hurricanes will hit, then we can't prepare for it. If we don't prepare for it then there will be more damage.
Brent Van Der Wiel's comment, October 3, 2013 8:09 PM
Scientists can never accurately predict what is going to happen with weather over a long period of time. Unless we get better technology or can somehow control weather, an accurate prediction just isn't going to happen. You can have all the evidence pointing towards a dry and uneventful season, but in a few days that can change to severe flooding and multiple hurricanes.
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Oklahoma tornadoes raise questions on future of disaster ... - Elsevier

Oklahoma tornadoes raise questions on future of disaster ... - Elsevier | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Starting with major floods in the Colorado River basin in the 1930s, the US Congress responded to natural disasters by passing special appropriations to help states and localities impacted by these disasters.
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Andrea Fuller's comment, October 1, 2013 10:25 AM
I agree too, the government should try to figure something out to help find out approaching disasters. I think scientist should help find new technology to help with the situation.
Brent Van Der Wiel's comment, October 3, 2013 8:13 PM
The government should try to help with approaching natural disasters, but there is no way to do that with current technology. If scientists can develop new prediction equipment, then maybe we can have government step in and help.
Jordan Meyer's comment, October 4, 2013 7:46 AM
The government should also be helping trying to predict natural disasters. It will save our country lots of time, effort, and money.
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Best Places to Live to Avoid Natural Disasters | Trulia Trends

Best Places to Live to Avoid Natural Disasters | Trulia Trends | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Today, Trulia added three new hazard maps – for wildfires, hurricanes, and tornadoes – to the two hazard maps we introduced earlier this summer, featuring earthquakes and floods. As part of your home search, you can now ...
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Jazz VanHemert's comment, September 26, 2013 10:44 PM
This article is explaining where you can get away from natural disasters in the US. It's saying that there really isn't that many places to avoid disasters now in the US. Around California there are earthquakes and wildfires, hurricanes and flooding by Florida, tornados in the south central area, and not Northeast because of the recent hurricane and flood, Hurricane Sandy. Also the places with natural disasters are proven to be more costly.
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Deadly 1,000-year floods strike Colorado | Grist

Deadly 1,000-year floods strike Colorado | Grist | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Flooding centered in Boulder, Colo., is so extreme that the National Weather Service called it "biblical." And it's just the latest climate-related disaster to strike the region.
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Jazz VanHemert's comment, September 26, 2013 10:36 PM
This article shows the effects of global warming. Colorado has never experienced rain like this and all of a sudden over a few years they are flooding. It is also because of the mountains there. A flow of extremely moist air from the southwest pushed up against the mountains and that caused the moisture to turn into rain. Geographical features has effect on natural disasters.
Kenzie Nossaman's comment, October 1, 2013 10:17 AM
I agree with you about that global warming is a cause of this! Thats crazy that it's flooding there. They were just suffering from drought and now they are having downpours and flooding! So, yes I agree with you that this a effect of global warming.
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Alberta flood damage set Canadian record, insurance group says

Alberta flood damage set Canadian record, insurance group says | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
June’s floods the most expensive natural disaster in Canadian history, Insurance Bureau says, pegging property damage at $1.7-billion (RT @KellyCryderman: AB June floods the costliest natural disaster in Cdn.
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Jazz VanHemert's comment, September 26, 2013 11:04 PM
We often worry about the places closest to us if they have a natural disaster but Canada should be about just as important. The floods have become the costliest insured natural disaster in Canadian history. Insurance companies have dished out about $1.7-billion worth of claims related to the floods in southern Alberta, and the high price tag will likely mean changes to the insurance business – with customers paying more for coverage. The IBC believes changes for the industry and its customers are likely which could be very concerning because of Canada's good industry.
Andrea Fuller's comment, October 1, 2013 10:23 AM
I think America should be concerned about Canada since they have resources that would be helpful, if the flooding has harmed any. I think that America should help out maybe a little, but we have our own flooding problems too.
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Colorado town unlivable for months after flooding, residents are told ...

Colorado town unlivable for months after flooding, residents are told ... | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Severe damage from the deadly floods that swept Colorado could keep residents of one town out of their homes for up to six months, officials said. E. coli bacteria contaminated the drinking water system for Lyons, and the ...
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Jazz VanHemert's comment, September 26, 2013 10:59 PM
This article tells about some affects of the flood in Colorado that we normally don't think of that are very concerning and important. E. coli bacteria contaminated the drinking water system, and the wastewater system suffered at least $1 million in damage. The flooding also hit oil fields on the state’s Front Range, and authorities said that at least 22,000 gallons of oil had spilled from tanks. These problems are very concerning I think.
Jordan Meyer's comment, October 4, 2013 7:44 AM
Its sad that this happened to colorado. They will definatley being doing more preventions with waterways to keep this from happening again and like you said loosing millions of dollars in the damage they have had.
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Don't Let the Next Natural Disaster Put You Out of Business

Don't Let the Next Natural Disaster Put You Out of Business | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Natural disasters — fires, floods, sinkholes, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, tidal waves, swarms of locusts, or worse — have affected more than 30 percent of U.S. businesses. So while they may sound rare, the odds are fairly high that ...
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Jazz VanHemert's comment, September 26, 2013 10:53 PM
This article is important because I don't think we realize how many businesses are affected by natural disasters. It is a fact that more than 30 percent of businesses are affected by natural disasters. The SBA estimates that more than 90 percent of businesses fail within two years of being struck by a disaster. It's hard to get back what you had. Especially if money is an issue which it is to many of people these days in the US.
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Mexico floods kill 80, leave thousands stranded in resort of Acapulco | Wash Post

Mexico floods kill 80, leave thousands stranded in resort of Acapulco | Wash Post | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

The toll from devastating twin storms climbed to 80 on Wednesday as isolated areas reported deaths and damage to the outside world, and Mexican officials said that a massive landslide in the mountains north of the resort of Acapulco could drive the number of confirmed dead even higher.

 

Interior Secretary Miguel Angel Osorio Chong said federal authorities had reached the cutoff village of La Pintada by helicopter and had airlifted out 35 residents, four of whom were seriously injured in the slide. Officials have not yet seen any bodies, he said, despite reports from people in the area that at least 18 people had been killed.

 

“It doesn’t look good, based on the photos we have in our possession,” Osorio Chong said, while noting that “up to this point, we do not have any (confirmed) as dead in the landslide.” Osorio Chong told local media that “this is a very powerful landslide, very big ... You can see that it hit a lot of houses.”

 

Mayor Edilberto Tabares of the township of Atoyac told Milenio television that 18 bodies had been recovered and possibly many more remained buried in the remote mountain village. Atoyac, a largely rural township about 42 miles (70 kilometers) west of Acapulco, is accessible only by a highway broken multiple times by landslides and flooding.

 

Ricardo de la Cruz, a spokesman for the federal Department of Civil Protection, said the death toll had risen to 80 from 60 earlier in the day, although he did not provide details of the reports that drove it up.

 

In Acapulco, three days of Biblical rain and leaden skies evaporated into broiling late-summer sunshine that roasted thousands of furious tourists trying vainly to escape the city, and hundreds of thousands of residents returning to homes devastated by reeking tides of brown floodwater.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Jazz VanHemert's comment, September 26, 2013 10:29 PM
Since Mexico seems different than states in the United States I thought this article would be interesting to share about how its different than other natural disasters that happen to the states. It is very eye-opening that some places are treated differently then other places even though they all had the same effect. Mexico's government can help for the damage of the town so many are homeless.