NATURAL DISASTERS
2 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by camilawarnken
Scoop.it!

Helicopter rescues another stranded hiker in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park - San Francisco Chronicle (blog)

Helicopter rescues another stranded hiker in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park - San Francisco Chronicle (blog) | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it
San Francisco Chronicle (blog) Helicopter rescues another stranded hiker in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park San Francisco Chronicle (blog) Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park authorities say rangers and a helicopter pilot rescued a 76-year-old visitor...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

WIRED: NASA's Plutonium Problem Could End Deep-Space Exploration - Earth's Reserves Almost Ran Out

WIRED: NASA's Plutonium Problem Could End Deep-Space Exploration - Earth's Reserves Almost Ran Out | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it

In 1977, the Voyager 1 spacecraft left Earth on a five-year mission to explore Jupiter and Saturn. Thirty-six years later, the car-size probe is still exploring, still sending its findings home. It has now put more than 19 billion kilometers between itself and the sun. Last week NASA announced that Voyager 1 had become the first man-made object to reach interstellar space.

 

The distance this craft has covered is almost incomprehensible. It’s so far away that it takes more than 17 hours for its signals to reach Earth. Along the way, Voyager 1 gave scientists their first close-up looks at Saturn, took the first images of Jupiter’s rings, discovered many of the moons circling those planets and revealed that Jupiter’s moon Io has active volcanoes. Now the spacecraft is discovering what the edge of the solar system is like, piercing the heliosheath where the last vestiges of the sun’s influence are felt and traversing the heliopause where cosmic currents overcome the solar wind. Voyager 1 is expected to keep working until 2025 when it will finally run out of power.

 

None of this would be possible without the spacecraft’s three batteries filled with plutonium-238. In fact, Most of what humanity knows about the outer planets came back to Earth on plutonium power. Cassini’s ongoing exploration of Saturn, Galileo’s trip to Jupiter, Curiosity’s exploration of the surface of Mars, and the 2015 flyby of Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft are all fueled by the stuff. The characteristics of this metal’s radioactive decay make it a super-fuel. More importantly, there is no other viable option. Solar power is too weak, chemical batteries don’t last, nuclear fission systems are too heavy. So, we depend on plutonium-238, a fuel largely acquired as by-product of making nuclear weapons.

 

But there’s a problem: We’ve almost run out. “We’ve got enough to last to the end of this decade. That’s it,” said Steve Johnson, a nuclear chemist at Idaho National Laboratory. And it’s not just the U.S. reserves that are in jeopardy. The entire planet’s stores are nearly depleted.

 

The country’s scientific stockpile has dwindled to around 36 pounds. To put that in perspective, the battery that powers NASA’s Curiosity rover, which is currently studying the surface of Mars, contains roughly 10 pounds of plutonium, and what’s left has already been spoken for and then some. The implications for space exploration are dire: No more plutonium-238 means not exploring perhaps 99 percent of the solar system. In effect, much of NASA’s $1.5 billion-a-year (and shrinking) planetary science program is running out of time. The nuclear crisis is so bad that affected researchers know it simply as “The Problem.”

 

But it doesn’t have to be that way. The required materials, reactors, and infrastructure are all in place to create plutonium-238. In fact, the U.S. government recently approved spending about $10 million a year to reconstitute production capabilities the nation shuttered almost two decades ago. In March, the DOE even produced a tiny amount of fresh plutonium inside a nuclear reactor in Tennessee.

 

The only natural supplies of plutonium-238 vanished eons before the Earth formed some 4.6 billion years ago. Exploding stars forge the silvery metal, but its half-life, or time required for 50 percent to disappear through decay, is just under 88 years.

 

Fortunately, we figured out how to produce it ourselves — and to harness it to create a remarkably persistent source of energy. Like other radioactive materials, plutonium-238 decays because its atomic structure is unstable. When an atom’s nucleus spontaneously decays, it fires off a helium core at high speed while leaving behind a uranium atom. These helium bullets, called alpha radiation, collide en masse with nearby atoms within a lump of plutonium — a material twice as dense as lead. The energy can cook a puck of plutonium-238 to nearly 1,260 degrees Celsius. To turn that into usable power, you wrap the puck with thermoelectrics that convert heat to electricity. Voila: You’ve got a battery that can power a spacecraft for decades.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Students crash rockets to develop new asteroid sample collection technique | GizMag.com

Students crash rockets to develop new asteroid sample collection technique | GizMag.com | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it

In what at first glance seems like a terrible sense of direction, in March students from the University of Washington fired rockets from kites and balloons at an altitude of 3,000 ft (914 m) straight into the ground at Black Rock, Nevada: a dry lake bed in the desert 100 mi (160 km) north of Reno. This may seem like the ultimate in larking about, but it's actually a serious effort to develop new ways of collecting samples from asteroids.

 

The test was part of the “Sample Return Systems for Extreme Environments” project. The idea is to find cheaper, more efficient ways of collecting samples from asteroids and hazardous areas on Earth, such as volcanoes and nuclear disaster zones, by using penetrators instead of soft landers or ground crews to hammer out sample cores.

 

According to the team, this would result in lower cost than soft landing techniques by reducing the velocity and vehicle mass needed to gather the sample, minimizing damage on impact, as well as being mechanically simpler. In the Nevada test, the penetrators were fired at the ground using rocket boosters to provide as much speed as possible at impact.

 

“We’re trying to figure out what the maximum speed is that a rocket can survive a hard impact,” says Robert Winglee, a UW professor of Earth and space sciences.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from NATURAL DISASTERS
Scoop.it!

Earthquake Study Points to Possible Carbon Injection Risks

Earthquake Study Points to Possible Carbon Injection Risks | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it
The oil industry triggered a series of small earthquakes in Texas by injecting carbon dioxide underground to boost well production, a new study says.
    

Via Thomas Faltin, camilawarnken
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

Japan Earthquake Triggers Tsunamis

Japan Earthquake Triggers Tsunamis | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it
An earthquake hit off the coast of Honshu, Japan, on October 25, 2013, measuring a magnitude of 7.1 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reports. According to local Tokyo time, the earthquake hit at 2:10 a.m.

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Volcanic Tsunamis | Volcano World

Volcanic Tsunamis | Volcano World | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it

A tsunami is a huge sea wave, or also known as a seismic sea-wave. They are very tall and height and have extreme power. A tsunami is formed when there is ground uplift and quickly following a drop. From this, the water column is pushed up above the average sea level. Volcanic tsunamis can result from violent  submarine explosions.

 

They can also be caused by caldera collapses, tectonic movement from volcanic activity,  flank failure into a water source or pyroclastic flow discharge into the sea. As the wave is formed, it moves in a vertical direction and gains great speeds in deeper waters and can reach speeds as fast as 650 mph. In shallow water it can still be as fast as 200mph.

 

They travel over the continental shelf and crash into the land. This power doesn’t decrease when they hit land though, there is an extreme amount of energy when the water travels back towards its source. Approximately 5 percent of tsunamis are formed from volcanoes and approximately  16.9 percent of volcanic fatalities occur from tsunamis. (Tanguy, J.C. 1998)

 

Click headline to read more and view graphics--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by camilawarnken
Scoop.it!

Los Angeles company offers top resort bid - Hawaii News Now

Los Angeles company offers top resort bid - Hawaii News Now | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it
Los Angeles company offers top resort bid
Hawaii News Now
HILO, Hawaii (AP) - A Los Angeles-based travel company is offering $3.5 million for Naniloa Volcanoes Resort.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Geology
Scoop.it!

Explosive news about Mars super-volcanoes - Sydney Morning Herald

Explosive news about Mars super-volcanoes - Sydney Morning Herald | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it
Explosive news about Mars super-volcanoes Sydney Morning Herald Using its sophisticated on-board laboratory, the rover has found, among other things, clay minerals – including sulphur, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and carbon – in powder...

Via Dr. Catherine Russell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Volcanic Tsunamis | Volcano World

Volcanic Tsunamis | Volcano World | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it

A tsunami is a huge sea wave, or also known as a seismic sea-wave. They are very tall and height and have extreme power. A tsunami is formed when there is ground uplift and quickly following a drop. From this, the water column is pushed up above the average sea level. Volcanic tsunamis can result from violent  submarine explosions.

 

They can also be caused by caldera collapses, tectonic movement from volcanic activity,  flank failure into a water source or pyroclastic flow discharge into the sea. As the wave is formed, it moves in a vertical direction and gains great speeds in deeper waters and can reach speeds as fast as 650 mph. In shallow water it can still be as fast as 200mph.

 

They travel over the continental shelf and crash into the land. This power doesn’t decrease when they hit land though, there is an extreme amount of energy when the water travels back towards its source. Approximately 5 percent of tsunamis are formed from volcanoes and approximately  16.9 percent of volcanic fatalities occur from tsunamis. (Tanguy, J.C. 1998)

 

Click headline to read more and view graphics--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Magma reservoir under Yellowstone park much larger than thought

Magma reservoir under Yellowstone park much larger than thought | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it

The reservoir of molten rock underneath Yellowstone National Park in the United States is at least two and a half times larger than previously thought. Despite this, the scientists who came up with this latest estimate say that the highest risk in the iconic park is not a volcanic eruption but a huge earthquake.

 

Yellowstone is famous for having a ‘hot spot’ of molten rock that rises from deep within the planet, fuelling the park’s geysers and hot springs1. Most of the magma resides in a partially molten blob a few kilometres beneath Earth’s surface.

 

New pictures of this plumbing system show that the reservoir is about 80 kilometres long and 20 kilometres wide, says Robert Smith, a geophysicist at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. “I don’t know of any other magma body that’s been imaged that’s that big,” he says.

 

Smith reported the finding on 27 October, 2013, at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Denver, Colorado.

 

Yellowstone lies in the western United States, where the mountain states of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho converge. The heart of the park is a caldera — a giant collapsed pit left behind by the last of three huge volcanic eruptions in the past 2.1 million years. Jamie Farrell, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Utah, mapped the underlying magma reservoir by analysing data from more than 4,500 earthquakes. Seismic waves travel more slowly through molten rock than through solid rock, and seismometers can detect those changes.

 

The images show that the reservoir resembles a 4,000-cubic-kilometre underground sponge, with 6–8% of it filled with molten rock. It underlies most of the Yellowstone caldera and extends a little beyond it to the northeast.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

Earthquake Study Points to Possible Carbon Injection Risks

Earthquake Study Points to Possible Carbon Injection Risks | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it
The oil industry triggered a series of small earthquakes in Texas by injecting carbon dioxide underground to boost well production, a new study says.
    

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by camilawarnken
Scoop.it!

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to reopen Thursday as shutdown ends - Pacific Business News (Honolulu) (blog)

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to reopen Thursday as shutdown ends - Pacific Business News (Honolulu) (blog) | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to reopen Thursday as shutdown ends Pacific Business News (Honolulu) (blog) The Hawaii Tribune Herald reports park spokeswoman Jessica Ferricane said the park's front gate would open at 6 a.m., followed by the...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by camilawarnken
Scoop.it!

Possible sale of Naniloa Volcanoes Resort in the works

Possible sale of Naniloa Volcanoes Resort in the works | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it
A possible sale is in the works for the Big Island's beleaguered Naniloa Volcanoes Resort. (Possible sale of Naniloa Volcanoes Resort in the works: A possible sale is in the works for the Big Island's...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from NATURAL DISASTERS
Scoop.it!

Small Tsunami Hits Japan After Off-Coast Earthquake

Small Tsunami Hits Japan After Off-Coast Earthquake | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it
A small tsunami hit the cost of Japan on Friday after an earthquake hit off the coast of Fukushima at about 1:10 p.m. eastern time. The tsunami was about a foot in height.

Via Thomas Faltin, camilawarnken
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from MOVIES VIDEOS & PICS
Scoop.it!

7.3 quake hits Japan, Fukushima evacuated over tsunami alert

An earthquake of 7.3 magnitude has hit 231 miles (371 kilometers) east of Japan's Honshu Island, according to the US Geological Survey, with tremors felt in ...

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

Small Tsunami Hits Japan After Off-Coast Earthquake

Small Tsunami Hits Japan After Off-Coast Earthquake | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it
A small tsunami hit the cost of Japan on Friday after an earthquake hit off the coast of Fukushima at about 1:10 p.m. eastern time. The tsunami was about a foot in height.

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from #USFCA
Scoop.it!

Alaskan quake could lead to California tsunami

Alaskan quake could lead to California tsunami | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it

Via University of San Francisco
more...
University of San Francisco's curator insight, September 5, 2013 2:59 PM

"The disaster would force at least 750,000 people to evacuate flooded areas, destroy port facilities in the Bay Area and Los Angeles, and send water surging up creeks, harbors and canals everywhere, the scientists said."


With social media use ever on the rise, social networks have become a primary source of news and information. USF's MPA created this infographic to show social media's role in effective disaster response: http://sco.lt/7m9yRl


[via SF Gate]

Rescooped by camilawarnken from Digital Delights for Learners
Scoop.it!

World Geography Games - Let's play and learn about the world

World Geography Games - Let's play and learn about the world | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it
Brain-engaging geography games to bring you knowledge about Countries, Continents, Earth, Oceans, Seas, Rivers, Islands, Cities, Mountains, Deserts, Volcanoes and more.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
RitaZ's curator insight, September 16, 2013 12:41 PM

Wonderful way of learning Geography

K P's curator insight, September 30, 2013 2:49 AM
(null)
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Disruptive Innovation
Scoop.it!

Solar lasers, ocean power and volcanoes: unusual energy sources of the future

Solar lasers, ocean power and volcanoes: unusual energy sources of the future | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it

How will the world be powered when we can't rely on fossil fuels? With volcanoes, waves solar power from space (RT @cnni: Could volcanoes power the world when fossil fuels run out?


Via Mark P
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Sustain Our Earth
Scoop.it!

Gas injection probably triggered small earthquakes near Snyder, Texas

Gas injection probably triggered small earthquakes near Snyder, Texas | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it
Austin TX (SPX) Nov 06, 2013 - A new study correlates a series of small earthquakes near Snyder, Texas between 2006 and 2011 with the underground injection of large volumes of gas, primarily carbon dioxide (CO2) - a finding that...

Via SustainOurEarth
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes › Ask an Expert | ABC Science

Earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes › Ask an Expert | ABC Science | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it

Causes of quakes

Is it possible for anything living to cause an earthquake?
— Megan


Yes, people can cause an earthquake through human activity. The most common way is by building a dam. It's very common to get small earthquakes after filling a dam, firstly because of the extra load due to the weight of the water; and then secondly because water seeping down into faults can cause them to move if they're at breaking point. Liquid acts as a lubricant enabling faults to slide more easily.

 

Another way humans can cause earthquakes is with mining - taking material out of the ground also causes little stresses which can results in earthquakes.

 

Pumping oil out can cause earthquakes by changing the stresses underground or because water pumped down to flush the oil out can have a lubricating effect.

 

Another human-related cause of earthquakes is when water is pumped through hot rocks several kilometres underground in order to harness geothermal energy. This can cause little tremors, up to magnitude 3 on the Richter Scale. Scientists use these small earthquakes to trace what is happening underground - they can follow exactly where the water is by following the little earthquakes.

 

— Clive Colins, seismologist, Geoscience Australia


Click headline to read more Ask the Expert Q & As--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by camilawarnken from Palestine
Scoop.it!

Four small earthquakes shake Delhi

Four small earthquakes shake Delhi | NATURAL DISASTERS | Scoop.it

Four earthquakes have shaken homes in the Indian capital, Delhi, sending people running into the streets.

 


Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
more...
No comment yet.