Natural Disasters and Pets
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Predicting Natural Disasters: Can Pets Sense Them Before Us?

Predicting Natural Disasters: Can Pets Sense Them Before Us? | Natural Disasters and Pets | Scoop.it
Do pets have an extra sense that allows them to predict natural disasters?
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Rescooped by Kim O'Donnell from The Forces of Nature: UNLEASHED
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CDC Extreme Heat | A Prevention Guide to Promote Your Personal Health and Safety

CDC Extreme Heat | A Prevention Guide to Promote Your Personal Health and Safety | Natural Disasters and Pets | Scoop.it
During Hot Weather

 

To protect your health when temperatures are extremely high, remember to keep cool and use common sense. The following tips are important:

 

Drink Plenty of Fluids

During hot weather you will need to increase your fluid intake, regardless of your activity level. Don't wait until you're thirsty to drink. During heavy exercise in a hot environment, drink two to four glasses (16-32 ounces) of cool fluids each hour.

Don't drink liquids that contain alcohol, or large amounts of sugar—these actually cause you to lose more body fluid. Also avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps.

 

Replace Salt and Minerals

Heavy sweating removes salt and minerals from the body. These are necessary for your body and must be replaced.

 

Wear Appropriate Clothing and Sunscreen

Wear as little clothing as possible when you are at home. Choose lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing. Sunburn affects your body's ability to cool itself and causes a loss of body fluids. It also causes pain and damages the skin. If you must go outdoors, protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat along with sunglasses, and by putting on sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher 30 minutes prior to going out. Continue to reapply it according to the package directions.

 

Schedule Outdoor Activities Carefully

If you must be outdoors, try to limit your outdoor activity to morning and evening hours. Try to rest often in shady areas so that your body's thermostat will have a chance to recover.

 

Pace Yourself

If you are not accustomed to working or exercising in a hot environment, start slowly and pick up the pace gradually. If exertion in the heat makes your heart pound and leaves you gasping for breath, STOP all activity. Get into a cool area or at least into the shade, and rest, especially if you become lightheaded, confused, weak, or faint.

 

Stay Cool Indoors

Stay indoors and, if at all possible, stay in an air-conditioned place. If your home does not have air conditioning, go to the shopping mall or public library—even a few hours spent in air conditioning can help your body stay cooler when you go back into the heat. Call your local health department to see if there are any heat-relief shelters in your area. Electric fans may provide comfort, but when the temperature is in the high 90s, fans will not prevent heat-related illness. Taking a cool shower or bath or moving to an air-conditioned place is a much better way to cool off. Use your stove and oven less to maintain a cooler temperature in your home.

 

Adjust to the Environment

Be aware that any sudden change in temperature, such as an early summer heat wave, will be stressful to your body. You will have a greater tolerance for heat if you limit your physical activity until you become accustomed to the heat. If you travel to a hotter climate, allow several days to become acclimated before attempting any vigorous exercise, and work up to it gradually.

 

 

Hot Weather Health Emergencies

Even short periods of high temperatures can cause serious health problems. During hot weather health emergencies, keep informed by listening to local weather and news channels or contact local health departments for health and safety updates. Doing too much on a hot day, spending too much time in the sun or staying too long in an overheated place can cause heat-related illnesses. Know the symptoms of heat disorders and overexposure to the sun, and be ready to give first aid treatment.

 

 


Via Christine Boutsia
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Rescooped by Kim O'Donnell from Natural Disasters (Year 8)
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What Causes a Tsunami? - Tsunami Geology - GEOLOGY.COM

What Causes a Tsunami? - Tsunami Geology - GEOLOGY.COM | Natural Disasters and Pets | Scoop.it
What Causes a Tsunami - by Geology.com...

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Tropical Weather : Weather Underground

Tropical Weather : Weather Underground | Natural Disasters and Pets | Scoop.it

Information on the tropics worldwide!


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Pets and Natural Disasters - Be Pet Prepared!

Pets and Natural Disasters - Be Pet Prepared! | Natural Disasters and Pets | Scoop.it
Disasters like hurricanes, tornadoes, fires and floods don't just affect you - they also affect your pets. In the event of a disaster, do not leave companion animals behind. They are like small children, they cannot fend for themselves and rely on...
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About Hurricanes

For millions of Americans, riding out a hurricane or other storm system can be a stressful experience. This article offers some insight into what it is like to experience a hurricane, tropical storm, noreaster, or other powerful storm.

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Rescooped by Kim O'Donnell from The Forces of Nature: UNLEASHED
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Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina ... was the costliest hurricane, as well as one of the five deadliest, in the history of the United States. Among recorded Atlantic hurricanes, it was the sixth strongest overall. Katrina was the costliest storm in United States history - with amounts over $81.2 billion. The death toll was over 1,836.


Via Christine Boutsia
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Christine Boutsia's comment, October 17, 2011 4:01 PM
Paul do you think that nature is taking its revenge on us for all the maltreatment we put it through???
georgaras's comment, October 19, 2011 6:45 AM
OH MY GOD!!!!!!!WHAT WAS THAT!!!!!!!!!
groupe4tpeadm's curator insight, November 9, 2015 11:38 AM

Ce site très complet sur les événements de l'ouragan Katrina nous a apporté des informations utiles tant scientifiquement que socialement.

Rescooped by Kim O'Donnell from Hurricanes
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NASA - View of Hurricane Ike From Space Station

NASA - View of Hurricane Ike From Space Station | Natural Disasters and Pets | Scoop.it

Hurricane Ike...From Space


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