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Government shutdown forces closure of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park - KHON2

Government shutdown forces closure of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park - KHON2 | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it
Big Island Video News Government shutdown forces closure of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park KHON2 Due to the shutdown of the federal government caused by the lapse in appropriations, the National Park Service (NPS) has closed all 401 national parks,...
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Solar lasers, ocean power and volcanoes: unusual energy sources of the future

Solar lasers, ocean power and volcanoes: unusual energy sources of the future | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it

How will the world be powered when we can't rely on fossil fuels? With volcanoes, waves solar power from space (RT @cnni: Could volcanoes power the world when fossil fuels run out?


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The Volcano Project by Kieren Jones

The Volcano Project by Kieren Jones | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it
Welsh designer Kieren Jones has devised a concept for harnessing the destructive power of erupting volcanoes by using lava flows to cast components for buildings. (more...)

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Japan Earthquake: Helicopter aerial view video of giant tsunami waves

COMING SOON: HANGOUT WITH ANTI-NUCLEAR ADVOCATE DR HELEN CALDICOTT. JOIN NOW & ASK YOUR QUESTIONS http://bit.ly/CaldicottHangout A ferocious tsunami spawned ...

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
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Eyewitness video of 2011 Tsunami

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."

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Mary Rack's comment, August 17, 2013 10:28 AM
I kept wondering what happened to the people filming & watching in the next few hours. How long before they were rescued? Where did they go then? I wish there were a way to find out. Since we have the video maybe we can get some information about them.
Sally Egan's curator insight, August 19, 2013 6:46 PM

Wow... nothing yu read or study can inform like the real footage.

 

gina lockton's curator insight, August 27, 2013 6:01 AM

Biophysical Geography - check this out!

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Alaskan quake could lead to California tsunami

Alaskan quake could lead to California tsunami | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it

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University of San Francisco's curator insight, September 5, 2013 2:59 PM

"The disaster would force at least 750,000 people to evacuate flooded areas, destroy port facilities in the Bay Area and Los Angeles, and send water surging up creeks, harbors and canals everywhere, the scientists said."


With social media use ever on the rise, social networks have become a primary source of news and information. USF's MPA created this infographic to show social media's role in effective disaster response: http://sco.lt/7m9yRl


[via SF Gate]

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Sakurajima Volcano Erupts in Japan: Largest Eruption in Decades Sends Ash Plume Thousands of Feet High - weather.com

Sakurajima Volcano Erupts in Japan: Largest Eruption in Decades Sends Ash Plume Thousands of Feet High - weather.com | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it

Volcanic smoke billows from Mount Sakurajima in Kagoshima, Japan, Sunday, Aug. 18, 2013. Sunday's eruption marked the 500th eruption this year at the mountain, which is one of Japan's most active volcanoes. (AP Photo/Kagoshima Local Meteorological Observatory)

Sakurajima, one of Japan's most active volcanoes, experienced one of its most powerful eruptions in decades Sunday, sending an ash plume thousands of feet into the air.

The volcano, located in the far southwestern part of Japan's mainland on the island of Kyushu, began to erupt at 4:31 p.m. local time Sunday (3:31 a.m. EDT U.S. time). The smoke plume eventually reached a height of 5,000 meters (approximately 16,000 feet), according to the Kagoshima Local Meteorological Observatory. Public broadcaster NHK reported it was the volcano's tallest ash plume since records began in 1955.

Visibility in the city of Kagoshima, where the volcano sits, deteriorated quickly as ash spread into populated portions of the city of 600,000 residents, according to the English-language NHK World website. NHK World said a pyroclastic flow, a fast-moving current of gas and rock, was observed along a one-kilometer (0.6-mile) swath on the southeast flank of the mountain.

Video from Japan's FNN television network shows the initial moment of the eruption:


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Quake after-effects : Nature Geoscience | Nature Publishing Group

Quake after-effects : Nature Geoscience | Nature Publishing Group | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it

How the Earth's crust rather than just buildings or humans responds to the violent shaking of an earthquake has been observed for centuries. Nevertheless, the wide range of geological impacts continues to surprise.

 

In 1835, during his voyage on the HMS Beagle, Charles Darwin experienced a large earthquake that occurred near Concepción, Chile. Although saddened by the extent of the destruction in the town, Darwin was also intrigued by the diversity of natural spectacles that occurred in the wake of the violent ground motions: 'at the same hour when the whole country around Concepcion was permanently elevated, a train of volcanoes situated in the Andes, in front of Chiloe, instantaneously spouted out a dark column of smoke [...] We thus see a permanent elevation of the land, renewed activity through habitual vents, and a submarine outburst, forming parts of one great phenomenon.'1 Our understanding of the variety of responses of Earth's crust to large earthquakes continues to expand. A web focus published online with this issue (http://www.nature.com/ngeo/focus/shaken-crust/index.html) explores some of these responses.

 

175 years after Darwin's visit to Chile, and in virtually the same location, the magnitude 8.8 Maule earthquake again left its mark on volcanic systems in the nearby Andes mountain range. Although the shaking on this occasion seemingly failed to trigger any eruptions, numerous volcanoes in the region sank by several centimetres almost immediately after the quake2. Volcanoes in Japan, too, sank by similar amounts following the devastating 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake3, 4. The precise cause of the sinking — escape of hydrothermal fluids or excessive subsidence of the hot, weak magma reservoirs as the tectonic plates rebounded — is still debated5, but the remarkable similarities between the observations from Chile and Japan imply that quake-induced volcanic subsidence could be a common occurrence worldwide.

 

In addition to the spouting Andean volcanoes, Darwin's colleague, Captain Robert Fitz-Roy, observed a more subdued response to the Concepción quake. A potent, sulphurous smell bubbled up from the ocean following the submarine outburst, which Darwin attributed to a stir-up of decomposing organic matter on the sea bed. A Letter in this issue also reports a seafloor response to a strong earthquake6. In this case, a quake in 1945 seems to have disturbed fragile gas hydrates trapped within sediments in the Arabian Sea, but the full extent of the seafloor response had gone undetected for almost 70 years. Seismic images and geochemical analyses now show that the magnitude 8.1 earthquake — the largest ever reported for the Arabian Sea — may have fractured sediments that held stores of hydrocarbons. About 3.26×108 mol of methane — a potent greenhouse gas — may have escaped in the decades following the quake and some could have reached the atmosphere. If quake-triggered release of methane is common, it could provide a significant contribution to the global carbon budget.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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20 Amazing Photos of Natural Disasters

20 Amazing Photos of Natural Disasters | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it
One thing's for sure: nature is anything but tame. While we've learned to deal with thunderstorms and snow flurries, the threat of natural disaster always seems to be looming over us.
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Anthony M Turner's comment, October 2, 2013 6:03 PM
thanks everyone for the re-scoops and comments - I had the privilege of working for 4 years in disaster recovery and have seen both the best and worst nature can throw at us, the resilience of people and these hidden impacts on wildlife - I can only urge each and everyone of you to be aware of the potential of such disasters and make preparations should such an event strike. If you're a business or know people in business who might be at risk please let them know about http://www.areuready.com.au where they can download a how to for preparation for under 12 bucks.
Sharla Shults's comment, October 2, 2013 6:17 PM
Anthony, awesome to 'meet' someone with such experience in disaster recovery. Only witnessed multiple hurricane disasters while living in FL but those were certainly enough!
Anthony M Turner's comment, October 3, 2013 7:21 AM
great to meet you to Sharla - all extreme weather events have a bitter sweet and are very scary - I think they help us understand how small we really are.
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Man-Made Cities and Natural Disasters

Man-Made Cities and Natural Disasters | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it
Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

 

The 21st century is the dawn of a new era in human history: more people on Earth live in cities than in the countryside.  The impacts of this new basic fact are far-reaching.  One of those is that cities that are in particular environments are more prone to certain natural disasters and will be increasingly vulnerable as their populations increase (especially megacities in the developing world).


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World Geography Games - Let's play and learn about the world

World Geography Games - Let's play and learn about the world | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it
Brain-engaging geography games to bring you knowledge about Countries, Continents, Earth, Oceans, Seas, Rivers, Islands, Cities, Mountains, Deserts, Volcanoes and more.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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RitaZ's curator insight, September 16, 2013 12:41 PM

Wonderful way of learning Geography

K P's curator insight, September 30, 2013 2:49 AM
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Volcanic Tsunamis | Volcano World

Volcanic Tsunamis | Volcano World | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it

A tsunami is a huge sea wave, or also known as a seismic sea-wave. They are very tall and height and have extreme power. A tsunami is formed when there is ground uplift and quickly following a drop. From this, the water column is pushed up above the average sea level. Volcanic tsunamis can result from violent  submarine explosions.

 

They can also be caused by caldera collapses, tectonic movement from volcanic activity,  flank failure into a water source or pyroclastic flow discharge into the sea. As the wave is formed, it moves in a vertical direction and gains great speeds in deeper waters and can reach speeds as fast as 650 mph. In shallow water it can still be as fast as 200mph.

 

They travel over the continental shelf and crash into the land. This power doesn’t decrease when they hit land though, there is an extreme amount of energy when the water travels back towards its source. Approximately 5 percent of tsunamis are formed from volcanoes and approximately  16.9 percent of volcanic fatalities occur from tsunamis. (Tanguy, J.C. 1998)

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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¿Por qué los huracanes tienden a formar una espiral logarítmica? - Naukas

¿Por qué los huracanes tienden a formar una espiral logarítmica? - Naukas | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it

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California Earthquake Warning System Bill Signed, But Will It Be Ready Before Next Big Quake?

California Earthquake Warning System Bill Signed, But Will It Be Ready Before Next Big Quake? | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it

"Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday ordered creation of a statewide earthquake early warning system that could give millions of Californians a few precious seconds of warning before a powerful temblor strikes."

 

[via Huffington Post]


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Earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes › Ask an Expert | ABC Science

Earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes › Ask an Expert | ABC Science | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it

Causes of quakes

Is it possible for anything living to cause an earthquake?
— Megan


Yes, people can cause an earthquake through human activity. The most common way is by building a dam. It's very common to get small earthquakes after filling a dam, firstly because of the extra load due to the weight of the water; and then secondly because water seeping down into faults can cause them to move if they're at breaking point. Liquid acts as a lubricant enabling faults to slide more easily.

 

Another way humans can cause earthquakes is with mining - taking material out of the ground also causes little stresses which can results in earthquakes.

 

Pumping oil out can cause earthquakes by changing the stresses underground or because water pumped down to flush the oil out can have a lubricating effect.

 

Another human-related cause of earthquakes is when water is pumped through hot rocks several kilometres underground in order to harness geothermal energy. This can cause little tremors, up to magnitude 3 on the Richter Scale. Scientists use these small earthquakes to trace what is happening underground - they can follow exactly where the water is by following the little earthquakes.

 

— Clive Colins, seismologist, Geoscience Australia


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Japan Earthquake: Helicopter aerial view video of giant tsunami waves

COMING SOON: HANGOUT WITH ANTI-NUCLEAR ADVOCATE DR HELEN CALDICOTT. JOIN NOW & ASK YOUR QUESTIONS http://bit.ly/CaldicottHangout A ferocious tsunami spawned ...

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Where Will the Next Volcano Erupt?

Where Will the Next Volcano Erupt? | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it

The recent eruption of Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano disrupted air traffic over much of Europe and stranded thousands of passengers across the world. The total cost is estimated to be $5 billion in lost GDP in 2010 alone. But now that dust has cleared, we can see that the eruption was small by historical standards, and there is always the chance of a bigger one: At any given time there are roughly 20 active volcanoes around the world, and there are 16 volcanoes—called "Decade Volcanoes"—that are currently noted to have a history of large eruptions and a proximity to populated areas. Imagine the cost if one of those erupts.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Travel Agents Seek Natural-Disaster Insurance

Travel Agents Seek Natural-Disaster Insurance | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it

The Finnish travel industry is negotiating an insurance system to cover losses caused by natural disasters, according to a report in several provincial newspapers on Tuesday.
So far there is no such system in Finland, while Denmark and Sweden have such systems in place.

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20 Amazing Photos of Natural Disasters

20 Amazing Photos of Natural Disasters | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it
One thing's for sure: nature is anything but tame. While we've learned to deal with thunderstorms and snow flurries, the threat of natural disaster always seems to be looming over us.

 


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F. Thunus's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:14 PM

add your insight...

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Comment on Top 8 Weirdest Natural Disasters by Chris Hatley

Comment on Top 8 Weirdest Natural Disasters by Chris Hatley | Natural Disaster | Scoop.it
You don't get it the trapped greenhouse gases are what we did,and causes extreme weather,the ice age was from an outside act as well.

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