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Hurricanes in South Carolina

Hurricanes in South Carolina | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
In a recent post, I discussed the occurrence of hurricanes in the North Atlantic basin. The data comes from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, a member of the US federal government. The data spans a bit more than 150 years.
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Climate Change: Hurricanes and Typhoons Kill Mainly the Poor #RIP I am very very sorry

Climate Change: Hurricanes and Typhoons Kill Mainly the Poor #RIP I am very very sorry | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

In the Philippines, Son-Tinh, locally called Ofel, was a tropical storm. Nevertheless the heavy rains triggered flooding that devastated the small islands in the center of the country and killed more than 27 people. At least 11 of the deaths were from drownings and landslides and 13 from collapsed building and falling trees. Over 11,000 people had to be moved to evacuation centers. Eight persons went missing — mostly fishermen at sea — and 19 were injured. - See more at: http://newsjunkiepost.com/2012/11/02/climate-change-hurricanes-and-typhoons-kill-mainly-the-poor/#sthash.a9KrdbNa.dpuf


Via Tatjana Dimitrijevic
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WORLDWIDE: Fisheries Another Victim of Japan Tsunami

WORLDWIDE: Fisheries Another Victim of Japan Tsunami | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

The devastating earthquake that ravaged Japan in 2011 may have also wreaked havoc on vital fisheries, researchers say.

 

The magnitude 9.0 Tohoku-Oki temblor in 2011 was the most powerful earthquake to hit Japan in recorded history, and set off a tsunami that lay waste to the country's northeastern coast, claiming the lives of nearly 19,000 people.

 

Past studies have analyzed the effects of tsunamis on marine ecosystems, for example investigating the effects the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami had on coral reefs, seagrass beds and mangrove forests. A recent study also showed how the tsunami affected the seafloor by leaving behind huge, underwater dunes.

 

However, until now, scientists had not looked into the effects of a major tsunami on fisheries, one of Japan's most important industries.

 

Since 2008, researchers had regularly surveyed fishery resources at the port of Tomarihama, the coastal area closest to the epicenter of the quake. To see what effects the tsunami had, scientists took a fisherman's boat to analyze this site via scuba diving three months after the catastrophe. Trees and structures up to 50 feet (15 meters) high on the area's coast were almost entirely destroyed by the disaster, suggesting the tsunami reached at least that height there.

 

"More than 90 percent of the boats around the survey point were swept away or destroyed by the tsunami, so it was difficult to rent a boat after the disaster," said researcher Hideki Takami, a marine biologist at the Tohoku National Fisheries Research Institute in Japan.

 

The scientists focused their survey on two types of marine life, abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) and sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus nudus). Both are valuable fisheries resources in Japan, and since they are common and abundant grazers there, both may exert strong influences on the marine ecosystems where they live.

 

The researchers found that levels of adult abalone dropped by more than half after the tsunami. In addition, "juvenile abalone and sea urchins largely decreased, to 14 and 5 percent of the densities just before the disaster, respectively," Takami told OurAmazingPlanet.

 

Underwater visibility at the site was much lower than it was before the earthquake due to sediment in the ocean, even three months after the tsunami. The researchers suggest the great turbulence the tsunami caused washed away many of the animals in the ecosystem.

 

The researchers do note these findings are based on surveys conducted at just one site, "so the overall picture of effects of the earthquake and tsunami event on rocky shore ecosystems remains largely unknown," Takami said. Still, given the drop in juvenile abalone levels, "since the age at first capture of abalone is at four to five years old, "the future commercial catch may considerably decrease for at least four to five years after the event," he said.

 

Future research should continuously monitor the ocean ecosystems "to avoid collapse of these ecologically and economically important resources," Takami said.

 

Takami and his colleagues Nam-il Won and Tomohiko Kawamura will detail their findings in a future issue of the journal Fisheries Oceanography.

 

- 7 Craziest Ways Japan's Earthquake Affected Earth: http://www.ouramazingplanet.com/2572-craziest-japan-earthquake-effects.html

 

- Waves of Destruction: History's Biggest Tsunamis: http://www.livescience.com/19618-history-biggest-tsunamis.html

 

- 7 Ways the Earth Changes in the Blink of an Eye: http://www.ouramazingplanet.com/239-seven-ways-the-earth-changes-in-the-blink-of-an-eye-100809html.html

 

Copyright 2013 OurAmazingPlanet, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Japan Earthquake Triggers Tsunamis

Japan Earthquake Triggers Tsunamis | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
An earthquake hit off the coast of Honshu, Japan, on October 25, 2013, measuring a magnitude of 7.1 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reports. According to local Tokyo time, the earthquake hit at 2:10 a.m.

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(EN) - Volcano Glossary | John Seach

(EN) - Volcano Glossary | John Seach | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

"Volcano Glossary - John Seach, volcano adventurer, filmmaker and scientist. Over the past 25 years John has traveled to the world's most exciting volcanoes, and witnessed eruptions during trips to more than 200 volcanoes. Volcano Live is the world's first volcano news and travel website, which monitors worldwide volcanic activity."


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Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to reopen Thursday as shutdown ends - Pacific Business News (Honolulu) (blog)

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to reopen Thursday as shutdown ends - Pacific Business News (Honolulu) (blog) | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to reopen Thursday as shutdown ends Pacific Business News (Honolulu) (blog) The Hawaii Tribune Herald reports park spokeswoman Jessica Ferricane said the park's front gate would open at 6 a.m., followed by the...
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Maine volcanoes (yes, Maine) among world's biggest - Fox News

Maine volcanoes (yes, Maine) among world's biggest - Fox News | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Maine volcanoes (yes, Maine) among world's biggest
Fox News
DENVER – Maine has supervolcanoes. Wait, Maine has volcanoes?

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Carbon capture and storage may trigger earthquakes

Carbon capture and storage may trigger earthquakes | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
A common strategy to combating global warming is getting a second look.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes › Ask an Expert | ABC Science

Earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes › Ask an Expert | ABC Science | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

Causes of quakes

Is it possible for anything living to cause an earthquake?
— Megan


Yes, people can cause an earthquake through human activity. The most common way is by building a dam. It's very common to get small earthquakes after filling a dam, firstly because of the extra load due to the weight of the water; and then secondly because water seeping down into faults can cause them to move if they're at breaking point. Liquid acts as a lubricant enabling faults to slide more easily.

 

Another way humans can cause earthquakes is with mining - taking material out of the ground also causes little stresses which can results in earthquakes.

 

Pumping oil out can cause earthquakes by changing the stresses underground or because water pumped down to flush the oil out can have a lubricating effect.

 

Another human-related cause of earthquakes is when water is pumped through hot rocks several kilometres underground in order to harness geothermal energy. This can cause little tremors, up to magnitude 3 on the Richter Scale. Scientists use these small earthquakes to trace what is happening underground - they can follow exactly where the water is by following the little earthquakes.

 

— Clive Colins, seismologist, Geoscience Australia


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Four small earthquakes shake Delhi

Four small earthquakes shake Delhi | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

Four earthquakes have shaken homes in the Indian capital, Delhi, sending people running into the streets.

 


Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
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Politics and disaster aid in the Philippines

Politics and disaster aid in the Philippines | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Political and family ties have affected the distribution of disaster aid from the government in the Philippines in the past. Will this time be different?
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Is Your State Prepared for Climate Change? [MAP]

Is Your State Prepared for Climate Change? [MAP] | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
It's a known fact that climate change is impacting how often natural events like floods and hurricanes occur and how severe their impact will be.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Cyclone, hurricane, typhoon: different names, same phenomenon

Cyclone, hurricane, typhoon: different names, same phenomenon | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Paris (AFP) Nov 10, 2013 - They may have different names according to the region they hit, but typhoons, hurricanes and cyclones are all violent tropical storms that can generate 10 times as much energy as the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

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NATURE: Simple tools speed up earth quake warnings

NATURE: Simple tools speed up earth quake warnings | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

Researchers have developed a new technique for quickly assessing the magnitude of large earthquakes, cutting down the time required in the case of the recent quake in Japan, for example, from about 20 minutes to just 2-3 minutes. Those crucial minutes would have helped with tsunami warnings and in making sure that even far-away communities like Tokyo had proper alerts as soon as possible, says Yehuda Bock of the University of California, San Diego, who developed the technique.

 

The strategy involves tying together real-time data coming from seismic instruments, which detect shaking, as well as Global Positioning System (GPS) instruments, which detect the absolute movements of the ground. Both devices are already installed in places such as Japan and California — the key is to ensure that they are delivering the right sort of data simultaneously, says Bock, who reported on his progress at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting in San Francisco, California, on 8 December. Bock and his colleagues this month received funding to build and test a prototype upgrade device, and hope to have an initial system in place in California within six months.

 

Seismic instruments are very sensitive, but have a hard time discriminating between large quakes of magnitude 7 or higher in the first seconds or minutes of an earthquake, because the shaking simply goes off the scale. In the case of the March 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Japan, for example, the Japan Meteorological Agency estimated the quake’s magnitude as just 6.8 after 38 seconds, and 8 after a few minutes, says Bock. It was not until weaker seismic readings from much further away were added to the analysis that they could say, 20 minutes after the quake began, that it was a devastating magnitude 9 — 30 times stronger than a magnitude-8 quake.

 

Accelerometers add another layer of information, but their data take too long to process to be of use. GPS instruments are more useful. The station closest to the epicentre, for example, showed a 1.5-metre drop of the ground in the first 100 seconds of the quake. “That’s huge,” says Bock. This provides a quick and obvious indication of large vertical ground displacement — the thing that causes tsunamis — and can be combined with seismic data to quickly assess quake size. But most GPS networks were designed to provide long-term data about ground movement, not short-term information during earthquakes; they may be designed to take readings once every 30 minutes and deliver data once a day, for example. And they aren’t necessarily installed next to seismometers. Of Japan’s 1,200 GPS stations — all of which are real time — only 180 are close enough to seismic stations to be of use in this sort of system, and so far they haven’t been utilized this way.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Vloasis's curator insight, June 4, 2013 1:32 AM

Pairing the seismic devices we have with current detection systems with GPS seems like something you might guess was already standard.

Sahaj Patel's curator insight, June 11, 2013 11:29 AM

A appropriate and proper alarm system for earth quake can save many lifes. Thanks for sharing Dr. Stefan.

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Major volcanic eruption seen on Jupiter's moon Io

Major volcanic eruption seen on Jupiter's moon Io | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

One of the most massive volcanic eruptions in the solar system has been spotted on Jupiter's moon Io – by a telescope perched on a volcano on Earth.

 

On 15 August the Keck II telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii recorded fountains of lava gushing from fissures in the Rarog Patera region of Io. Heated by gravitational squeezing from Jupiter and its other moons, Io is covered in volcanoes that erupt almost continuously. This event is easily in the top 10 yet seen on Io by humans, says Ashley Davies of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

 

"We try to look at Io at every opportunity, in the hope of seeing something like this," says Davies. "This time we got lucky." The lava fountains spouted molten rock hundreds of metres above Io's surface, erupting over an area totalling 31 square kilometers.

 

The Galileo spacecraft, which toured the Jovian system from 1995 to 2003, was the last mission to get a close, near-constant view of the action on Io. But other monitoring efforts like the Keck programme have helped make it clear just how much violence Io is capable of.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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SSMS Science's curator insight, October 29, 2013 11:28 PM

Recent observations on lo, one of Jupiter's moons, has shown a huge volcanic eruption there. It is 390,400,000 miles from Earth. lo is the innermost of the four largest moons around Jupiter, and is the most volcanically active object in the Solar System. Dr. Imke de Pater said that this eruption is one of the top ten most powerful eruptions that have been seen on lo. She said, "It is a very energetic eruption that covers over a thirty square kilometer area." She said that is appears to have a large energy output. lo's eruptions can't be seen from Earth, but infared cameras have been able to show that there are likely fountains of lava flowing from it. There has been no photos or data on the eruption, since scientists are still making observations on it. They think a gravitational pull between Jupiter and lo is one cause of the moon's intense vulcanism. I think it is fascinating to see volcanic eruptions somewhere else than Earth. CB

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Geophysicists have discovered the largest underwater volcano an Earth, rivaling Olympus Mons on Mars

Geophysicists have discovered the largest underwater volcano an Earth, rivaling Olympus Mons on Mars | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

Geophysicists have discovered what they say is the largest single volcano on Earth, a 650-kilometer-wide beast the size of the British Isles lurking beneath the waters of the northwest Pacific Ocean. The megavolcano has been inactive for some 140 million years. But its very existence will help geophysicists to set limits on how much magma can be stored in Earth's crust and pour out onto the surface. It also shows that Earth can produce volcanoes on par with Olympus Mons on Mars, which, at 625 kilometers across, was until now the biggest volcano known in the Solar System.

 

“This says that here on Earth we have analogous volcanoes to the big ones we find on Mars,” says William Sager, a marine geologist at the University of Houston in Texas. “I’m not sure anybody would have guessed that.” Sager and his colleagues describe the structure, named Tamu Massif, in Nature Geoscience on 8 September, 2013. ‘Tamu’ is an acronym for Texas A&M University in College Station, where Sager was formerly employed.

 

The Tamu Massif has been long known as one of three large mountains that make up an underwater range called the Shatsky Rise. The rise, about 1,500 kilometers east of Japan, formed near a junction where three plates of Earth’s crust once pulled apart. Shallow rock cores from Tamu had previously revealed that it was made of lava. But geologists thought that the mountain, which rises 4 kilometres from the sea floor, might have built up from several volcanoes erupting such that their lava merged into one pile. The islands of Hawaii and Iceland were built this way.

 

Sager and his colleagues were startled by findings they made after sailing the research vessel Marcus G. Langseth over Tamu in 2010 and 2012. They used air guns to send seismic waves through the mountain, and monitored the reflections. The seismic waves penetrated several kilometres into the massif — and showed that all of its lava flows dipped away from the volcano’s summit, implying a central magma vent. “From whatever angle you look at it, the lava flows appear to come from the centre of this thing,” says Sager.

 

Over time, the lava coursed downhill and then solidified, building up a volcano with a long, low profile similar to that of a shield laid on the ground. The world’s biggest active shield volcano, Mauna Loa on Hawaii, has an areal footprint just 15% of Tamu’s — but Mauna Loa is taller, rising 9 kilometers from sea floor to summit.

 

Scott Bryan, a geologist at the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia, warns that not all of Tamu may have come from a single magma vent. There could be separate sources, deeper than the seismic waves penetrated, that could have oozed out lava and inflated the mountain from below, he says.

 

Because ship time is at a premium, the study is one of the first to peer at the internal geometry of these massive underwater mountains. It is possible that other megavolcanoes are waiting to be discovered. “There may be bigger ones out there,” says Sager.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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World Geography Games - Let's play and learn about the world

World Geography Games - Let's play and learn about the world | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Brain-engaging geography games to bring you knowledge about Countries, Continents, Earth, Oceans, Seas, Rivers, Islands, Cities, Mountains, Deserts, Volcanoes and more.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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RitaZ's curator insight, September 16, 2013 12:41 PM

Wonderful way of learning Geography

K P's curator insight, September 30, 2013 2:49 AM
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Volcanic Tsunamis | Volcano World

Volcanic Tsunamis | Volcano World | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

A tsunami is a huge sea wave, or also known as a seismic sea-wave. They are very tall and height and have extreme power. A tsunami is formed when there is ground uplift and quickly following a drop. From this, the water column is pushed up above the average sea level. Volcanic tsunamis can result from violent  submarine explosions.

 

They can also be caused by caldera collapses, tectonic movement from volcanic activity,  flank failure into a water source or pyroclastic flow discharge into the sea. As the wave is formed, it moves in a vertical direction and gains great speeds in deeper waters and can reach speeds as fast as 650 mph. In shallow water it can still be as fast as 200mph.

 

They travel over the continental shelf and crash into the land. This power doesn’t decrease when they hit land though, there is an extreme amount of energy when the water travels back towards its source. Approximately 5 percent of tsunamis are formed from volcanoes and approximately  16.9 percent of volcanic fatalities occur from tsunamis. (Tanguy, J.C. 1998)

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Earthquake Study Points to Possible Carbon Injection Risks

Earthquake Study Points to Possible Carbon Injection Risks | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
The oil industry triggered a series of small earthquakes in Texas by injecting carbon dioxide underground to boost well production, a new study says.
    

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3.0 and 3.5 Magnitude Earthquakes registered on Hawaii Island.

Two small earthquakes shake Hawaii Island.

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NATURAL DISASTER - Gmod Storm Chasers w/Nova, Immortal & Kevin Ep.1

Please be sure to leave a LIKE if you enjoy :) ▻ SUBSCRIBE for more videos! http://bit.ly/subnova ◅ Storm Chasers are here! To track down the deadliest of to...
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