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Proposed Power Lines Tangle With Native American History - NPR

Proposed Power Lines Tangle With Native American History - NPR | Native Americans | Scoop.it
NPR
Proposed Power Lines Tangle With Native American History
NPR
Imagine running power lines through a cathedral.
Lauren Kingery's insight:

I think that the power line that people want to propose should be declined. It goes right through a place that is sacred to Native Americans. And the place is still used today by Native Americans for vision quests and spiritual ceremonies. I think that since those drawings have been there, and since the Native Americans still use that place, the power line should not go there. Archaeologists think that is should be protected and that they should preserve that cutural spot for Native Americans. And I agree with what the archaeologists said, it was the Native Americans land first, so I feel they should get to keep it and not have a power line disturbing and going right through the cave. 

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Anna Linde's comment, October 4, 2013 11:46 AM
These wall paintings do look like a cathedral. I mean there is so many of them. most of them are red.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 16, 2013 8:23 PM
Excellent scoop! This is a touchy topic and definitely a great one for this assignment--well done!
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Appropriating Native American Imagery Honors No One but the Prejudice - ABC News

Appropriating Native American Imagery Honors No One but the Prejudice - ABC News | Native Americans | Scoop.it
ABC News Appropriating Native American Imagery Honors No One but the Prejudice ABC News I was a sophomore in high school, about 15 years old, when a rather hostile group of cheerleaders and football players cornered me, yelling, as I sat on a bench...
Lauren Kingery's insight:

I think if you are going to show Native American imagery, make sure you capture the real image. Now a days people show what they think the image of Native Americans is, which is usually wrong, and that is very offensive to Native Americans. People dress in goofy headdresses, and they paint themselvs, and they wear feathers and think that they are respecting Native Americans. When Native American people are very hurt by that. I am fine with showing the image of Native Americans, as long as it is done in the right way. That's the most important part. And thats the part that people seem to forget about. 

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Jerod Garland's comment, October 16, 2013 8:24 PM
Couldn't agree more, Lauren. Great explanation.
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As season starts, Native American tribe launches radio ad against ...

As season starts, Native American tribe launches radio ad against ... | Native Americans | Scoop.it
By Simon Moya-Smith, Staff Writer, NBC News. As the Washington Redskins prepare to take on the Philadelphia Eagles at the team's season opener Monday night, an Indian tribe in upstate New York is preparing to take on ...
Lauren Kingery's insight:

I think, again, the team should make a name change. The Native American people want to be treated as what they are, Americans. They don't want to be thought as a "term".The term Redskin for Native Americans is different for them than it is for us. To them it means that society first takes your land, then your language and culture, and then they will pick you a mascot and you will be okay with it. So basically it says that we don't care how you feel about it, you have no say. Which is wrong. Native Americans just want to change something simple, and I think it should be done. 

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Lucas Duenwald's comment, October 8, 2013 7:54 PM
I think that they should be alloud to keep their team name. It isn't in the form of mockery, it is in the form of honor. If the Native americans are that opposed to it then it should be changed though.
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For Native Americans, Mental Health Budget Cuts Hit Hard - NPR (blog)

For Native Americans, Mental Health Budget Cuts Hit Hard
NPR (blog)
Native American tribes gave up millions of acres to the federal government in the 19th century in exchange for promises of funded health care, education and housing.
Lauren Kingery's insight:

When the Native Americans gave up millions of acres of land, the federal government promised funded health care, education and housing. But, many times those funds have been cut. I think that unfunding those cuts is not right. They live of those funds, and they were promised them, so in return for land they gave up, they should get what they were promised. With the health care not fully funded, the suicide prevention program will struggle with providing free or low-cost mental or physical health care. And with the suicide rate being four times more for Native Americans they can't deal with the cuts that are happening. And 80% of the budget comes from the fedreal government, so they need the money. Its not like the money is being wasted, I think that cutting the funds to these much needed programs is not right and they deserve to get the full fund. 

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Jerod Garland's comment, October 16, 2013 8:26 PM
Great facts!
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Powwow to feature education on Native American culture, memorial services - Richmond Register

Powwow to feature education on Native American culture, memorial services - Richmond Register | Native Americans | Scoop.it
Powwow to feature education on Native American culture, memorial services
Richmond Register
Arvel Bird, a grammy-winning musician who plays celtic, folk, Native American and blues/rock music will be performing.
Lauren Kingery's insight:

I think the Powwow hosting this event is a good thing. It gives people a chance to really get to know Native American culture and they get to experience music and do Native American crafts. I think its important becuase people need to realzie that Native American people are still there. And that is why they host this event, so people don't forget about that. I think what they are doing is great, and I hope they keep it up so the Native American culture doesn't die out in that spot. 

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Corin McKinstrey's comment, October 2, 2013 1:12 PM
I think that this is very interesting. The Native American culture is very different and definitely very unique. I think that their culture is very diverse and it can attract a lot of people. I think that people are interested in the Native Americans and they can learn a lot from them. This is a great way to try and keep the Native American culture alive.
josh dekoning's comment, October 2, 2013 1:54 PM
I think that is a good thing cause then people would now more about the Native Americans.
Carly Schaus's comment, October 3, 2013 9:52 PM
I think this is a good thing because people learn more about the Native American culture and how they deal with things. Also so we can keep the Native American culture in the future.
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Native American tribe calls protesters who destroyed 9/11 memorial ...

Native American tribe calls protesters who destroyed 9/11 memorial ... | Native Americans | Scoop.it
The protesters who uprooted a 9/11 memorial display at a liberal arts college in Vermont claimed they were defending Abenaki tribal lands and taking a stand against U.S. imperialism.
Lauren Kingery's insight:

I think that what the Native Americans said was totally true. I think it was totally wrong for those five students to ruin the 9/11 memorial site. There actions were totally out of control. They claim that they were helping and protecting the local tribes land, but the tribe stated that the flags were welcome. In fact, they said those flags represented and was in honor of the warriors and their bravery. And I am totally against those people who took out all of those flags, it was wrong and they had no business doing that. 

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Michael Karnes's comment, October 2, 2013 2:00 PM
Ya your right thats just wrong for them to do that they had no right to uproot the 9/11 memorial like that.
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Should the R-word be banned?

Should the R-word be banned? | Native Americans | Scoop.it
Pressure is mounting on the Washington Redskins to change their name because of the offence it causes Native Americans. But will a club that is steeped in tradition ever buckle?
Lauren Kingery's insight:

I think it should. The word Redskin was first used by the Native American ancestors when they were getting forced off their land and their children were getting sent to boarding schools. And that is something they don't like recalling. Also, the leader of the group said that he was called a redskin when he was in school, and he thinks the term is giving the wrong message to the world. Many of the fans think that if they changed the name, it would take away from the history that they are used to and that they grew up with. But I don't think they are really thinking of the what it really does to the Native Americans. It is racial, and I think that it should be changed.

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Makenna Bogaard's comment, October 2, 2013 2:01 PM
I agree with you. They should respect the Native American culture. This could make some people angry and lead them to remember hard times.
Matthew Bryan Vos's comment, October 2, 2013 3:52 PM
Well it takes a long process to change a name in the eyes of the NFL . It won't kill the team or the NFL to do so, I really don,t see any excuse to override the request. A name change will never change the history of what the team has achieved in the past it will just sound different with the name change but everything is the same team,players,coaches,staff,and the organization it's self is the same.
Laurel Stelter's comment, October 2, 2013 6:48 PM
I feel like it would be a good idea to change the name. If Native Americans are feeling offended by this, then it should be changed. I'm sure that the NFL doesn't mean to offend anyone, but it is. Maybe overtime the NFL could work on changing the team's name.
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5 big Native American health issues you don't know about | Al Jazeera America

5 big Native American health issues you don't know about | Al Jazeera America | Native Americans | Scoop.it
There are many reasons Native Americans die younger.

Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
Lauren Kingery's insight:

Native Americans, struggle with many different health issues. I think we need to be aware of what is going on in their lives. We really need to help what they are going through. They have the highest rate of diabetes. Which is mostly caused by the poverty they live in. I think we should offer them more job oppertunities so they don't have to live in poverty. Also, they get food rations from the fedual goverenment, which are cheap and unhealthy. They struggle from a lot of thngs becasue of the enviroment and conditions they live in, so I think its our job as the United States to help them out. And then hopefully with better condition and with them in better health, they can become succesfull and the health issues for Native Americans will drop. 

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Corin McKinstrey's curator insight, September 26, 2013 8:18 PM

I think that we should try and help the Native Americans with their poor health. They are in poverty which is one of the reasons why diabetes is so high in their culture. Maybe if we tried to support them and help them get real jobs they could live healthier lives. The Native American culture is dying. They are becoming a small group of people in the US but they are still people. Even though they want to keep their traditional values and beliefs I think that they should be practical and try and be productive citizens of the US. We did invade their land and I think that instead of fighting with them and putting them on reserves we should help them and treat them just like everyone else.