National Identity
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National Identity
CUS3.3 - Describes different cultural influences and their contribution to Australian Identities --> National symbols (e.g. national anthem, flags, coat of arms), national culture represented by ballads, songs and colours, and significant sites (e.g. the Opera House, Uluru, the Snow Mountains Scheme)
Curated by Vivian Huynh
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The Aboriginal flag

The Aboriginal flag | National Identity | Scoop.it
Vivian Huynh's insight:

The Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies defines itself as "a community working in partnership with Indigenous Australians to carry out tasks that acknowledge, affirm and raise awareness of Australian Indigenous cultures and histories, in all their richness and diversity".

 

Using the selection criteria for the Evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies, I deem this resource to be authentic as it identifies Harold Thomas (the author of the Aboriginal flag) as a Luritja man from Central Australia, and his father a Wombai man. It does not generalise him to be just of Aboriginal decent, but is specific.The page is also balanced in the nature of the presentation, allowing its audience to explore the Torres Strait Islander's flag on a separate page. There is a balanced view of the two and does not use the word Aboriginal to refer to both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People. Though it is unclear who specifically wrote the information on the page, AIATSIS is governed by a Council of nine members, five of which must be an Aboriginal person or Torres Strait Islander. The information provided "is consistent with the views and sensitivities of relevant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples". There is also a sensitivity warning regarding their resources (some photos, film, books, etc.) which may include images of deceased persons.

This website provides information about the Aboriginal Flag, it's symbolic meaning and the context in which it was created. It also provides this information for the Torres Strait Islander flag. Through the website, you may access the abundant resources available online http://www.aiatsis.gov.au/collections/exhibitions.html which include photos, videos and newspapers (The Koori Mail); all documenting the history of Australia and the involvement of Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders in contributing to the Australian Identity.

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United Kingdom symbols and flag and national anthem

United Kingdom symbols and flag and national anthem | National Identity | Scoop.it
United Kingdom symbols flag and official animal, bird, flag, flower, motto, nickname, seal, song, tree and more - by worldatlas.com
Vivian Huynh's insight:

Largely diverse and versatile resource for many subjects. You are able to find  every country's flag, and possibly a large range of symbols associated with that country/state/province. This website has enough general information for students to create a general idea of how each country is represented, their similarities and differences. For example: the "Union Jack" is not only part of the Australian flag, but also the flag of the United Kingdom and is used in many other flags of other nations and regions as they are/once were linked to the British Empire.

 

This resource can be used in a variety of ways. Students may use this to compare the similarities and differences between different nations, how other nations had influenced Australia (particularly Britain). The resource can also be used alongside the 100 Australian Icons resource, to have an enlarged map of the world in the classroom, and have students add to the map what they know about each country such as their national symbols (obtained from the resource). Having this map in the classroom could also help students understand the society they live in, being able to visually link news and current affairs to a visual map of where events are taking place and what students already know. This strategy also helps students build on their schemata of knowledge regarding the world and also to organise information visually, acting as a visual prompt to recall information about different nations. Through the year, new information may be added on to eventually build into what students have learnt about the world and can also act as a "Self assessement" for students to monitor.

The "Self Assessment" for students (as a class) would only work if students build a list of information they wish to know about the world, other countries, etc. and at the end of each week/month/term (as seen fit) students revise these questions to determine if they have brought in the information to fulfil the answers to their questions. These also places the responsibility on students to be aware of news around them and to bring new information to the class. 

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It's an Honour - Symbols

It's an Honour - Symbols | National Identity | Scoop.it
Vivian Huynh's insight:

This website offers a brief description of the various symbols which are globally associated with Australia as a nation. These brief descriptions include the history of how these symbols were chosen to represent Australia and its significance, as well as extra information to understand what these symbols represent in regards to Australia. Though each of these symbols are the formal symbols of Australia , where the Opal, Floral Emblem, Coat of Arms and the colours associated to Australia are made up of the various things which can only be found within the country or are native to the country, there are now other symbols which make up the modern Multicultural Australia. 

 

Linking back to prior lessons, or during a unit of work which involves students learning about the beginning of a Multicultural Australia point out that there are aspects of other cultures which make up the current day Australian Nation. An assessment task for students, each child chooses a culture or country (they may choose their own if they like but make sure there is a diverse range) and research how their chosen culture/country first emerged in Australia (link back to any previous lessons/units of work; e.g. The first wave of Chinese immigrants in Australia began with the gold rush, whilst citizens from other countries may have come on an assisted passage, etc.). A brief report of their research should be included as a background information/history of the emergence of that culture within Australia which may be presented on a portfolio folder for the teacher to display around the classroom by standing them up (like open books) or hanging on lines. Students then also need to present to their class the brief introduction of their country, emergence in Australia and also bring in an artefact which represents their chosen culture and describe how it has influenced Australia and become part of it's national identity. For Example: The Irish culture can be seen amongst the Australian society, particularly in the celebration of St Patrick's day. The symbol of wearing a green item acts in celebration of the heritage and culture of Ireland. Influences on the Australian identity began when large numbers of Irish migrated to Australia during the 18-19th Century.

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Australian Geographic's 100 Aussie icons

Australian Geographic's 100 Aussie icons | National Identity | Scoop.it
From the sacred and the profound to the almost unbelievable, here are our picks of the top 100 Aussie icons
Vivian Huynh's insight:

Fantastic starting point for introducing national symbols and Australian culture whilst familiarising with what students are already familiar with. By allowing students to identify the various symbols and icons in the centre image, educators can familiarise themselves with the prior knowledge of each student and the class as a whole to work towards planning the most appropriately suited lessons for that class in that topic. The site lists the one-hundred icons considered to be Australian with a brief description, using the image consisting those one-hundred icons, as a class determine what students are most familiar with (what they recognise) and then let students convey what they wish to learn more about (engaging more students with their learning). The site also works well for teachers to extend their lessons to explore varying aspects of Australian culture, for example: Exploring Banjo Paterson's poems and ballads and what kind of image is painted about the country during that time.

 

Brief task for students to do, is to pick one symbol each, and linking to literacy, write a few short paragraphs describing how that symbol represents Australia (only a short descriptive and informative text, not a recount or report). In addition to this task, take each of the 100 icons and place them on a large plain map of Australia with some brief information alongside each icon. This acts as a graphic organiser (Petty, 2009, pp. 115-130) which may help students become familiar with Australia and its history, as well as the geographic location of events and its influences. e.g. Why are the main cities along the coasts? When the  people mainly reached Australia by boat, which is along the coast.

 

This particular website is also very sufficient to demonstrate how various symbols, from the past (e.g. Ned Kelly) and also more recently developed (e.g. Surfing) all contribute to the changing Australian culture but are all still symbols of Australia. They reflect influences on the changes in Australia towards developing the "Australian Identity".

 

Reference:

G. Petty. 2009. Evidence-Based Teaching: A Practical Approach. Second Edition.

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Caddy Storage's curator insight, September 19, 2013 8:16 PM

Rightfully placed the Australian ute is one of the top ingenious icons. Some really typical Aussie icons

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Geographic Features

Geographic Features | National Identity | Scoop.it
Vivian Huynh's insight:

This website, particularly the tab for geographic features of Australia, provides a general overview as to what makes Australia special. As the information is succinct and focuses on the significance of these geographic features in Australia, at times compared to the world, students are able to use de Bono's six thinking hats in this situation to be creative in appreciating Australia and what it has to offer.

 

An idea for a task, is to have students present to their class, their chosen Australian geographic feature and persuade the audience the value or significance of this feature, and make people want to visit it. Students could be using de Bono's six thinking hats to explore a geographic feature of Australia, in which they must fill out a table, each column being the six different hats, as a planning tool. The order which the table should be filled in is first, "White hat" full of factual information gathered, followed by the Yellow and Black hat, which students need to determine, the pros and cons about their particular chosen geographic feature of Australia. The blue hat is then used to determine, how would this geographic feature be perceived by other people, and the thinking processes involved to emphasise the significance of the particular geographic feature in Australia. Lastly, students use the green hat for some creative thinking as to how could they portray their gathered information to best promote their geographic feature, also utilising the red hat thinking, of what emotions do they want to evoke from the audience.

 

Reference:

E. de Bono. 1985. Six Thinking Hats.

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