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Scientists 3D Print New Solar Panels Which Work Best When Cloudy

These solar cells, called organic photovoltaic, are unlike any other. They are made up of small organic molecules which act as semi conductors when struct with solar radiation. The amazing thing is that the molecules can easily be dissolved into a solution and 3D printed into any shape, size, or color desired.

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Solar panels are the future of energy, at least for those living in areas of the world where the majority of days are filled with bright sunshine, like Florida, Arizona, Egypt, etc. Until recently, if you lived in Seattle, or most of Britain, and Northern Europe, than solar power is not something to get all that excited about.

 

This week, British scientists at the National Physical Laboratory, created special solar panels which function best when it’s gloomy outside. That’s right, they produce more energy when clouds are blocking the sun, than when the sun is out in full force. In fact, scientists have shown that the new solar panels manage only 10% efficiency when placed in direct sunlight, while that number jumps to 13% when placed in cloudy conditions.

 

These solar cells, called organic photovoltaic, are unlike any other. They are made up of small organic molecules which act as semi conductors when struct with solar radiation. The amazing thing is that the molecules can easily be dissolved into a solution and 3D printed into any shape, size, or color desired.

 

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http://www.imaginethat-3d.com/#!scientists-3d-print-new-solar-panels-whi/c17gm

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The world's first? 3D printed mouth-watering Kentucky Fried Chicken

The world's first? 3D printed mouth-watering Kentucky Fried Chicken | 3D Printing | Scoop.it

For the last 30 years, 3D printers have been mainly used for rapid prototyping of new parts at the development stage. With recent advances in speed and accuracy, 3D printing has made its way to the consumer-level and the significance of this technology is changing the way we think about design.

Technicians at Yokohama-based 3D printing and data modeling firm iJet has recently reproduced a Kentucky Fried Chicken using 3D printing. After learning how to make an original chicken in a local KFC restaurant, they started their experiement. The team first placed a drumstick of an original KFC Colonel's Original Recipe chicken carefully on the working table, making sure not to damage its deliciously seasoned skin, and then started scanning the outline of the chicken.

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For the last 30 years, 3D printers have been mainly used for rapid prototyping of new parts at the development stage. With recent advances in speed and accuracy, 3D printing has made its way to the consumer-level and the significance of this technology is changing the way we think about design.

 

Technicians at Yokohama-based 3D printing and data modeling firm iJet has recently reproduced a Kentucky Fried Chicken using 3D printing. After learning how to make an original chicken in a local KFC restaurant, they started their experiement. The team first placed a drumstick of an original KFC Colonel's Original Recipe chicken carefully on the working table, making sure not to damage its deliciously seasoned skin, and then started scanning the outline of the chicken.

 

The data was then sent to a computer in real-time. Due to the limitation of the 3D scanner, technicians needed to work on the correction of the contours and crevices. After some modification of the original data, the 3D model was ready for 3D printing.

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3D Printed Liver Makes Surgery Safe

3D Printed Liver Makes Surgery Safe | 3D Printing | Scoop.it

A new method of 3D printing an anatomically accurate replica of the human liver is now helping to guide surgeons during tricky procedures.

 

The 3D-printed replicas, which are made of transparent material threaded with colored arteries and veins, could help surgeons prevent complications when performing liver transplants or removing cancerous tumors, researchers said.

 

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A new method of 3D printing an anatomically accurate replica of the human liver is now helping to guide surgeons during tricky procedures.

 

The 3D-printed replicas, which are made of transparent material threaded with colored arteries and veins, could help surgeons prevent complications when performing liver transplants or removing cancerous tumors, researchers said.

 

"We provide the surgeons with a physical model that is 100 percent identical to what they will encounter in surgery when they operate," said Dr. Nizar Zein, the chief of hepatology at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. "It takes away some of the potential surprises that will be found at the time of surgery."

 

The new liver replica could also be used to train medical students in the techniques needed for surgery, Zein said.

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Doctors Use 3-D Printing To Help A Baby Breathe

Doctors Use 3-D Printing To Help A Baby Breathe | 3D Printing | Scoop.it

3-D printers have been used to build jewelry, art and even guns. But Hollister is using the technology to create medical devices. He uses a 3-D printer that melts particles of plastic dust with a laser. He has already built afor a patient in Italy and has helped another baby with a condition similar to Garrett's. But Garrett is a lot of sicker and his condition is a lot more complicated.

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Ever since the day Garrett Peterson was born, his parents have had to watch him suddenly just stop breathing.

 

"He could go from being totally fine to turning blue sometimes — not even kidding — in 30 seconds," says Garrett's mother, Natalie Peterson, 25, of Layton, Utah. "It was so fast. It was really scary."

 

Garrett was born with a defective windpipe. His condition, known as left his trachea so weak the littlest thing makes it collapse, cutting off his ability to breathe.

 

When he got upset, or even sometimes just with a diaper change, he would turn completely blue," his mother says, "and that was terrifying."

 

So the Petersons contacted at the University of Michigan, who specializes in conditions like Garrett's. He teamed up with , a biomedical engineer who runs the university's , to create a remarkable solution to Garrett's problem — a device that will hold open Garrett's windpipe until it's strong enough to work on its own.

 

Instead of shooting ink onto a flat page to print words or pictures, 3-D printers use other material, such as plastic or metal, to create three-dimensional objects.

 

"You build up layers until you have the complete 3-D structure," Hollister says.

 

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Robot elephant trunk learns motor skills like a baby

Robot elephant trunk learns motor skills like a baby | 3D Printing | Scoop.it

I AM in Jochen Steil's lab, grasping a segmented, whiplashing tentacle that resists and tries to push me away. It feels strangely alive, as though I am trying to throttle a giant alien maggot. In fact, I am training a bionic elephant's trunk to do real-world jobs like picking apples or replacing light bulbs – something non-experts haven't been able to do until now.

 

Designed to bring the dexterity of an elephant's trunk to industrial robots, the appendage I am wrestling was launched by German engineering firm Festo as a proof-of-concept in 2010. The design showed that a trunk formed of 3D-printed segments can be controlled by an array of pneumatic artificial muscles.

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I AM in Jochen Steil's lab, grasping a segmented, whiplashing tentacle that resists and tries to push me away. It feels strangely alive, as though I am trying to throttle a giant alien maggot. In fact, I am training a bionic elephant's trunk to do real-world jobs like picking apples or replacing light bulbs – something non-experts haven't been able to do until now.

 

Designed to bring the dexterity of an elephant's trunk to industrial robots, the appendage I am wrestling was launched by German engineering firm Festo as a proof-of-concept in 2010. The design showed that a trunk formed of 3D-printed segments can be controlled by an array of pneumatic artificial muscles.

 

But beyond a handful of motions, such as shaking hands – including once with German chancellor Angela Merkel – or grasping a bottle, the machine wasn't built with its own precision control software. "They deliver it without much control. You can try, but the arm will be centimetres from where it should be, which is no good," says Steil, an intelligent systems engineer at Bielefeld University, also in Germany.

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