Narwhal
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Conservation Status - Narwhals!

Conservation Status - Narwhals! | Narwhal | Scoop.it
Learn all about narwhals
Janice's insight:

-The US has stopped the importation of narwhal tusks

 

-Some countries in Europe have limited the amount of narwhals able to be killed per year

 

-In Canada, only the Inuit are allowed to hunt narwhals, but they can only use them as food

 

-Technically speaking, narwhals are not "endangered"

 

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-because these animals are primarily used as food, is important to the Inuit people, we just believe fishing restrictions and smaller hunting seasons should be imposed to help allow Narwhals to grow in population.

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Narwhal | Basic Facts About Narwhals | Defenders of Wildlife

Narwhal | Basic Facts About Narwhals | Defenders of Wildlife | Narwhal | Scoop.it
Learn about the size, diet, population, range, behavior and other fascinating facts about narwhals.
Janice's insight:

-Narwhals are mostly hunted by polar bears and orcas. Native Inuit people are also allowed to hunt this whale legally.

 

-In addition, the narwhal’s habitat is threatened by the effects of climate change and pollution.

 

-One recent study concluded that the narwhal might be even more sensitive to the impacts of climate change than the polar bear.

 

-Their small population size, limited range, and reliance on Arctic fish that are also being affected by climate-induced available food changes, make them extremely vulnerable

 

-Females give birth every 3 years or so and can nurse their calves for over a year

 

-hey prefer to stay near the surface of the ocean, but can dive up to 5,000 feet. Narwhals are migratory and move closer to the shore in the summer, while moving out to sea and living under packed ice in the winter months.

 

-Narwhals are very elusive and mysterious in nature, and very distinct in appearance due to the large horn-like tusk on their faces

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Narwhal | Species | WWF

Narwhal | Species | WWF | Narwhal | Scoop.it
Janice's insight:

-The International Whaling Commission (IWC) is the body charged with regulating whaling and addressing the vast number of other threats to whales, dolphins and porpoises in our oceans such as shipping, climate change, and bycatch

 

-WWF partnered with Natural Resource Defense Council and Ocean Conservation Research to raise awareness of and address the threat of ocean noise on marine animals like the beluga.

 

-Our Don’t Be a Buckethead initiative shares the story of the many different Arctic marine species which depend on sound for survival and the harmful effects of underwater noise pollution

 

-WWF studies the movements of narwhals by attaching satellite tags to the animals. These satellite tags allow us to follow the movements of the narwhals during their annual feeding and reproductive routines. This information will help us better understand these unique animals.

 

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