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Suntech’s Imminent Bankruptcy May Have a Silver Lining | MIT Technology Review

Suntech’s Imminent Bankruptcy May Have a Silver Lining | MIT Technology Review | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
Solar manufacturers like Suntech are struggling. Hundreds need to die for the industry to recover.

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  Nanotechnology /New IP of Nano/ can  give  new  opportunity  for  development  to  solar  manufacturers  like  Suntech.                                     Best  Regards,  Sergey .

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Nanotechnology to any company for Development on real market.
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Pittsburgh Penguins Survive Predators Rally to Claim Game One of the Stanley Cup Finals In 5-3 Victory

Pittsburgh Penguins Survive Predators Rally to Claim Game One of the Stanley Cup Finals In 5-3 Victory | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
May 29, 2017; Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Nashville Predators center Frederick Gaudreau (32) scores a goal past Pittsburgh Penguins goalie Matt Murray (30) during the third period in game one of the 2017 Stanley Cup Final at PPG PAINTS Arena. Credit: Bruce Bennett/Pool Photo via USA TODAY Sports Jake... http://blackchristiannews.com/2017/05/pittsburgh-penguins-survive-predators-rally-to-claim-game-one-of-the-stanley-cup-finals-in-5-3-victory/
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Best Organization of NHL for Play - Off .
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KevinMD.com

KevinMD.com | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
Your medical records are a gold mine for cybercriminals

Martine Ehrenclou, MA | Patient | May 27, 2016

Some say privacy is an illusion. I hope that isn’t true, but I do know that our medical records are not safe. Why should you care? Because our medical records contain our social security numbers, health insurance information, our home addresses, phone numbers, emergency contacts and their phone numbers, our email addresses, possibly our driver’s license numbers, and likely credit card payment information. Ever paid your co-pay with a credit card?

Your medical record is worth ten times more to a cyber criminal than your credit card number. And with health care’s mandatory transition to electronic medical records, cyber thieves have taken full advantage.

 

If you think major institutions are immune to cyber attacks, think again. You might recall the cyber attacks on our U.S. government. One in particular compromised personal information on 22.1 million people and 5.6 million fingerprints were stolen.

 

No doubt you’re aware of the major ransomware attacks on hospitals across the country where cyber criminals seized patients’ electronic medical records and held them for ransom to be paid in Bitcoin.

According to the Ponemon Institute’s Fifth Annual Study on Medical Identity Theft, 90 percent of health care organizations have been hacked, exposing millions of patients’ medical records.

 

You probably remember the cyber attacks on these major health insurers, Blue Cross Blue Shield. Over 10 million patients’ medical records were exposed. 65 percent of medical theft costs each victim $13,500 to resolve the crime.

According to Modern Healthcare, nearly one in eight patients have had their medical records exposed in breaches in the United States. Since that article was published in 2014, that number has likely doubled.

You might be asking yourself, “What could cyber criminals do with my personal information housed in my medical records?”

 

Cyber criminals can monetize your personal information to obtain credit cards or loans, commit tax fraud, send fake bills to insurance providers, obtain government benefits from Medicare and Medicaid, and much more. Your personal information can also be used to purchase health care services, prescription medications, and medical equipment. It can also be used to obtain your credit report.

The above can also corrupt your medical history with inaccurate diagnoses and treatments.

This is pretty scary stuff. I’ve heard from friends and colleagues that they can only take in small amounts of this information because it’s frightening and they feel it’s beyond their control.

 

There is something you can do.

It is up to doctors, hospitals, and other healthcare organizations/companies to secure their electronic medical records, backup hard drives, use secure cloud platforms, encrypt emails, update software and more. Many just aren’t doing it.

According to the HIPAA Breach Notification Rule, a hospital or health insurance company that has been victim of a security breach, must inform patients. Unfortunately many do not. Patients find out about errors on their Explanation of Benefits (EOBs,) in letters from collection agencies, by finding mistakes in their health records or on their credit reports.

As a patient, you are at risk. So am I. And we are all patients even if we just see a physician once every year or two. Had a baby? Had a vaccine? Been treated for the flu? All of us are patients and have been since we saw pediatricians when we were kids.

What you can do to protect yourself

1. Read your Explanation of Benefits (EOBs) that are sent from your health insurance plan. Call your health insurance company if you do not recognize a charge.

2. Get copies of your medical records from medical providers and review them for errors. Look out for misdiagnoses, incorrect pre-existing conditions, procedures you didn’t have, incorrect treatments, and more. If you have trouble understanding your medical records, ask your doctor or his/her nurse to help you understand the information.

3. Monitor your credit reports and billing statements for errors.

4. Do not give out your social security number to anyone unless absolutely necessary. Often the last four digits will do.

5. If you have your medical records or any personal information on your smartphone, be careful about using public Wi-Fi. This includes any hospital. If you are a patient or visitor at a hospital, make sure the Wi-Fi is encrypted If you send or receive an email or browse the internet while using public Wi-Fi that is not encrypted, a hacker can eavesdrop on your transmission and gain access to the information on your device.

6. Set your laptop or computer to manually select the public Wi-Fi network in the healthcare facility you are in.

7. Look for web addresses that begin with https. These are more secure.

8. Do not share personal information on file sharing sites. Often they are not secure, according to Becker’s Hospital Review, “10 Ways Patient Data is Shared With Hackers.”

For computers, the FBI recommends:

Keep your firewall turned on.Install and/or update your antivirus software.Keep your operating system up to date.Be careful what you downloadTurn off your computer at night.

For more information on cyber attacks, cyber security, data mining and patients medical records, see the following:

How much health care data is minded without your knowledge?

Rapid Increase of Cyber Attacks

Patients’ Medical Records hacked at Alarming Rate

Martine Ehrenclou is a patient advocate.  She is the author of Critical Conditions: The Essential Hospital Guide to Get Your Loved One Out Alive and the Take-Charge Patient.

Image credit: Shutterstock.com


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*/S.Y\  Best  Nano  Consulting  for  SME's .
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Learn What Spatial Analysis Can Do for You

Learn What Spatial Analysis Can Do for You | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it

Go Places with Spatial Analysis

This Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) is for people who know something about data analysis and want to learn about the special capabilities of spatial data analysis. Spatial analysis focuses on location to gain a deeper understanding of data. Spatial analysis skills are in high demand by organizations around the world. You'll get free access to the full analytical capabilities of ArcGIS Online, Esri's cloud-based GIS platform. Previous experience with GIS software is helpful, but not necessary for tech-savvy problem solvers. Could you and your career go places with spatial analysis?


See more at: http://www.esri.com/landing-pages/training/spatial-analysis#sthash.l3uiS00k.dpuf


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How ProPublica, OPB Used Digital Magazines to Showcase Stories Anew | Mediashift | PBS

How ProPublica, OPB Used Digital Magazines to Showcase Stories Anew | Mediashift | PBS | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it

Digital magazine publishing is increasingly within reach for all kinds of content creators — big, small, non-profit, for profit. As another way to reuse existing content and reach audiences, digital magazines might especially appeal to non-profit and public media news organizations.


At least two such organizations — ProPublica and Oregon Public Broadcasting — have launched free digital iPad magazines to showcase their reporting. The magazines are a low-cost way to gain exposure for their work because they repurpose existing digital content into a new storytelling medium. These organizations’ creative use of digital magazines shows how versatile digital magazines are, and early reactions to the publications suggest the experiments may be a success....


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Profit  Magazine - Great storytelling always wins in journalism. Same for PR and marketing too. Here's a useful look at how two organizations are getting great results from digital magazines.  -  */S.Y\  History of Thought Leader is Storytelling of Charmer On - line on Network.
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 5, 2013 1:39 PM

Great storytelling always wins in journalism. Same for PR and marketing too. Here's a useful look at how two organizations are getting great results from digital magazines.

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Bitcoin Pioneer Says New Coin to Work on Many Blockchains

Bitcoin Pioneer Says New Coin to Work on Many Blockchains | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
Jeff Garzik, one of a handful of key developers who helped build the underlying software for bitcoin that is known as blockchain, has seen its shortcomings firsthand. So he decided to create a better digital currency.

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A Better  Digital  Currency ?!
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Emerging Paradigms and the Future of Business

Emerging Paradigms and the Future of Business | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
I had the pleasure of joining SAP’s Coffee Break with Game Changers Radio Show on August 5th.  This was my third appearance on the show, and I was joined by Futurist Gray Scott and SAP Global Innov...

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Frank Diana's curator insight, August 10, 2015 8:27 AM

A summary of last weeks #SAPRadio  session with +Bonnie D. Graham, +Timo Elliott and +Gray Scott 

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Sales Reps, Stop Asking Leading Questions - HBR

Sales Reps, Stop Asking Leading Questions - HBR | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
To maximize the power of consultative selling, we have to move beyond a simplistic view of solution selling. It’s not about grilling the buyer but rather engaging in a give-and-take as the seller and buyer explore the client’s priorities, examine what is in the business’s best interests, and evaluate the seller’s solutions. Asking questions is part of this engagement process, but there’s a right way to do it. Here are some important pitfalls to avoid:

Avoid checklist-style questioning. 

Avoid asking leading questions. 

Avoid negative conversational behaviors. 

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Consultative selling is a fundamental business strategy centered on creating value through insight and perspective that paves the way toward long-term relationships and genuine solutions for your customers. When sellers do it right, that strategy comes to life. - */S.Y\ Consultative Selling after the Understanding of the Value recomendation from Thought Leader .
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Joe Rizzo's curator insight, March 19, 2017 9:12 PM

Especially the last one. AVOID!

 

Visualize your Marketing Stack. marketingIO will analyze your marketing technology and deliver a visual of your MarTech Stack. Free. Go here: http://go.marketingio.com/stack_analysis 

 

marketingIO: MarTech for B2B Marketers. Strategy, Software, Services, Support, Staffing.  Go here to submit RFQs: http://www.marketingio.com #MarTech #DigitalMarketing

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Brand success in an era of Digital Darwinism | McKinsey & Company

Brand success in an era of Digital Darwinism | McKinsey & Company | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
The Internet has become an indispensable tool for marketers, yet there are still gaps in understanding its role in shaping how consumers choose among brands. With the help of a powerful data set, we have been studying the relationship between the level of digitization across the consumer’s decision journey and the likelihood that a consumer will select a brand after considering and evaluating its qualities. We compiled data on 1,000 brands across a wide range of product categories, covering 20,000 consumer journeys and 100,000 touchpoints along them.1 The research paints a vivid picture of the factors involved in a consumer’s purchase choice (also known as brand conversion). Overall, the landscape exhibits what we and others call Digital Darwinism:
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:
More actively digital consumers are prone to abandon a brand midstream for a number of reasons. They are more likely to have joined Facebook, Twitter, or product-evaluation PLATFORMSfor conversations about the qualities of products or services. The greater number of touchpoints before purchase increases the odds a consumer will encounter a deal breaker along the digital highway. What’s more, companies have less control over more digitally seasoned consumers, who initiate their prepurchase interactions independently. And since the level and influence of advertising in the social-media space have yet to reach the levels common in offline channels, brand messages are less likely to influence decisions.  -   */S.Y\  Law of Social Media. POSITIVE SOCIAL INTERACTIONS give the Growth of Your Social Media. A Permanent Creativity born Real Interest & New Connections of Users in Network. 
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maria londoño's curator insight, March 13, 2015 12:54 PM

AÑADA su visión ...

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The Three Phases of Transformational Change

The Three Phases of Transformational Change | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
Have you ever started out on a new path, a new philosophy or even just tried to introduce something new at work. Maybe it was a simple as trying to convince your bosses that "Dress Down Fridays" are a good idea and won't tarnish the firm's image. And did you notice what your idea had to go through to be accepted?

All change -- I've come to the conclusion -- goes through three main stages. This is Adapted from 19th century German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer's three stages of truth -- which is that "all truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

My personal interpretation of this goes for transformational change too. Whether that's you suddenly telling your Mediterranean meat-eating family that you're suddenly giving up meat (that was me), or you're trying to introduce as company newsletter (me again) or you're telling your mates that you're giving up your safe corporate office job to become a coach and author (me again!) -- you will undoubtably encounter:

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The Three Phases of Transformational Change .  -  */S.Y\  Transformation  =  Change + SuperChange +  A Multi - Level Change.
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David Hain's curator insight, November 12, 2014 1:08 AM

Change often comes in 3 phases.  Here's one take on the trio. Useful to orientate efforts.

priya chopra's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:44 AM
http://horandarwin7.wordpress.com/
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Curiosity and Creativity - The Creative Mind

Curiosity and Creativity - The Creative Mind | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it

Psychologists and creativity experts think curiosity is a fundamental aspect of facilitating creativity.

 

Psychologist Todd Kashdan says, “Curiosity has been neglected, even though there are few things in our arsenal that are so consistently and highly related to every facet of well-being — to needs for belonging, for meaning, for confidence, for autonomy, for spirituality, for achievement, for creativity.”


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Curiosity and Creativity.   -  */S.Y\  Smart Tips. Many Faces of Constructivism. Look the Mirror of Thought Leader. You can see Much Creativity on Demand. 

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Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:58 PM

TOUT EST GRATUIT mon ami sinon je je n'y serais pas lol !
http://www.globallshare.com/fr/1200655.html

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The evolution of brain drain and its measurement

The evolution of brain drain and its measurement | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it

As part of the report ‘International Comparative Performance of the UK Research Base: 2011’, commissioned by the UK’s Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), a fresh way of looking at researcher mobility was sought. In the report, published in October 2011, Scopus data were used to produce a conceptual map of the stocks and flows of human capital (i.e. researchers) in the UK over a 15-year period 1996–2010 (conceptual and methodological details were discussed in Part I of this article in the previous issue of Research Trends). Thinking of the global researcher population as a sea of talent, the study aimed to quantify the size of the waves and the direction of the current from the UK’s perspective.


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The evolution of brain drain and its measurement .  _  */S.Y\   Smart Tips. Many Faces of Constructivism. Look the Mirror of Thought Leader. You can see Much Creativity on Demand.

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5 Steps to Thinking Creatively

5 Steps to Thinking Creatively | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it

"Geniuses produce because they think fluently and flexibly," says Michael Michalko in his book "Cracking Creativity."

 

"Fluency of thought means generating quantities of ideas." A key characteristic of genius is immense productivity. Thomas Edison held 1093 patents. Einstein published 248 papers. Darwin wrote 119 papers besides his theory of evolution. Therefore, if you want more creative/innovative thinking in your organization, you must encourage the generation of "quantities of ideas."

 

However, if you stifle creative thinking by sending subtle or not so subtle messages that "we must just spend our time doing things the way we have always done"...because they have worked, you'll never find a better more efficient method. Your innovative risk-taking competitor will! That's how Microsoft climbed to success passing IBM and why they know they have to continue investing mega-millions in R&D.

 

===> You must encourage people to think creatively and take risks. <===

 


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Trust: What it is, Why it Matters and How to Get & Keep it.  -  */S.Y\  A Multi - Level Creativity is New KIND of TRUST. 

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Are universities difficult to negotiate with?

Are universities difficult to negotiate with? | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
There is a strand of opinion among companies that deal with universities, that the latter (and in particular their technology transfer departments) overvalue their technology; that they are difficu...

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Nanotechnology give New Philosophy for Science , and real Application of they for Development.

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Julien Brohan's curator insight, April 7, 2015 4:29 PM

Myths about how difficult it can be to get license from universities

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10 things I learned from @kevinmd about why physicians should actively participate on social media

10 things I learned from @kevinmd about why physicians should actively participate on social media | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it

While social media and its intersection with medicine may evoke both interest and anxiety among physicians, medical organizations are paying increasing attention to its potential. Therefore, I was not surprised to find that the American College of Chest Physicians, one such organization has been actively growing its social media presence recently, chose this topic for a plenary address at this year’s CHEST Conference. The keynote speaker was one of the most influential physicians on social media today, Dr Kevin Pho (left in picture). Pho was born in the United States, but grew up in Toronto, before returning to the U.S. to complete medical school and specialty training in Internal Medicine at Boston University, after which he set up practice in New Hampshire. His foray into social media began in 2004 when he created his medical blog, KevinMD.com, which subsequently has become one of the most prominent and popular examples of its type. He joined Twitter in 2007, where his presence has been equally strong, amassing 112,000 current followers.

Pho presented a compelling and entertaining case for why physicians need to participate actively on social media. Here are his reasons:

1. We’re way behind. Physicians in particular lag behind much of the rest of society in their adoption of social media. As Pho said, “A few years ago, the only people who had pagers were doctors and drug dealers. Today, it’s just doctors.”

2. Medical misinformation has become widespread as the public increasingly turns to the internet for answers. Pho summarized the problem aptly: “The internet allows people who took their last science course in high school to go toe to toe with experts”. He cites the pervasive myth of a link between vaccines and autism as a key example of dangerous misinformation that, despite having been completely debunked by physicians and scientists, continues to flourish online, where the voices of these experts are all too thin on the ground. The implications of Pho’s concerns are obvious: our key role as patient educators is being systematically undermined as technology has freed everyone to find information, reliable or not, much more easily elsewhere. Unless physicians begin to compete en masse on the same battleground, we risk being drowned out by myths, fears and vested interests.

3. People don’t remember evidence, they remember stories. Logical fallacies and erroneous conclusions about health can achieve public credibility because they are often wrapped up in a compelling story or anecdote. This creates an apparent dilemma for health professionals: having been trained in evidence-based practice, we know the biases inherent in anecdotes, yet it seems clear that we won’t win hearts and minds with facts and figures alone. Instead, recognizing that stories have more power for the public than evidence, we must share our own stories, with messages that are congruent with the evidence.

4. When physicians do engage online, we are powerful voices. Blogs, media articles and interviews by physicians tend to garner a lot of public attention and to be ranked highly by search engines like Google. And some physicians have become very creative at using popular forms of social media to make powerful health messages go viral. Pho cited the example of Dr Zubin Damania, a specialist in internal medicine based in Las Vegas who has become an internet celebrity by creating rap videos, under the name ZDoggMD, often with public health messages: a video about testicular self-examination, featuring Damania dressed as Michael Jackson (complete with sparkling exam glove!), has been especially popular. A less sensational homegrown example that comes to mind is the popular whiteboard videos produced by Toronto family physicianDr Mike Evans.

5. Social media can be a valuable and efficient tool for continuing medical education. Twitter, in particular, can be powerful in this way, as it allows the user to create curated lists specifically tailored to personal needs and interests. This allows physicians to follow key organizations, journals and thought leaders in medicine. My personal experience seems to confirm the value of this. I joined Twitter just over a year ago, rather reluctantly in fact, but motivated at that time by the intersection of my role as an editor with the expansion of CMAJ’s social media presence, and also by the creation of a Twitter spinoff of amonthly journal club for Respirology trainees that I have overseen for the last decade. Being a physician on Twitter has taught me several things. As I predicted, I have been unable to refrain from becoming an active contributor of Twitter content, which probably says more about me than about Twitter itself (many of my colleagues and trainees are content merely to follow). Twitter has enable me to make many pleasant (and a few unpleasant) and unexpected connections with people whom I otherwise would probably not have encountered. And I now get information faster than ever before on a whole variety of things that are important to me. I find this offsets the extra time spent every day checking Twitter: because it’s such a concise medium, you can learn all you need to know about many things quickly, but also flag those things you need to read about in detail. I find I actually keep up with the medical literature even better now than when I was limited to more primitive media like e-mail or (heaven forbid) print journals.

6. If physicians don’t join online media because they choose to, they will soon join because they have to. Pho argued that connecting with patients online is fast becoming a health care imperative. This rings true to me – it seems in the last few years more and more patients want to communicate with me by e-mail, requiring me to engage with the benefits and risks inherent in that.

7. Physicians must take control of establishing and protecting their online reputation. Pho advised: “Google yourself at least once a week and see what comes up. Because that’s what patients are seeing.” I took his advice. I was glad to see that my profile at CMAJ came up first, then my profile at the University of Toronto. Then a bunch of stuff I’ve published (I was a bit surprised that a 2009 piece on investing in health research came up highest among the editorials I’ve written – I learned something already). Then – wait a minute – a profile on me from an organization I’ve never signed up with, providing a fairly detailed description of my activities, all compiled from the web. All fairly positive and accurate, fortunately – except that it says I live in Maryland (huh?). A physician rating website comes up, but I have no ratings. Pho’s point is clear – we need to stay aware and take control of the face we present to the world, a world that is increasingly online and out of our direction, but not beyond our influence. He suggests that physicians start to shape their online presence by creating profiles on sites like LinkedIn and Google My Business.

8. Risks associated with online activity (i.e. that anything you post is public and persists indefinitely) can be managed with thoughtful use.Ensuring this is essential, however, and is congruent with our duties of professionalism and confidentiality. As Pho said, “We need to be as professional on the web as we are in the room in front of patients”. But he also argued that the biggest risk of social media is not using it at all, thereby failing to connect with and educate the public adequately.

9. Sharing stories online allows the public to see that doctors are human too. This may be an important way to recalibrate public perceptions of physicians and expectations of us by illustrating why we do what we do.

10. Using social media is a good introduction to learning to work with the media in general. Pho underscored the importance of this: “It is essential for physicians to develop media skills if we hope to have a say in health care.”

For physicians seeking further guidance about how social media affects them, Pho has published a book entitled “Establishing, Managing and Protecting Your Online Reputation”. A unique and reader-friendly handbook, its topics range from how physicians should create our digital footprint to how we can connect and be heard to make a difference in health care.

Pho is right – we need to embrace social media, whether we like or not. Once we do, we probably will like it. And both we and our patients will be better off for it.



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*/S.Y\   Self - Awareness is the Positive Results of Transformation with new Mindset .
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Libertex Recensioni – È Libertex Trading Broker TRUFFA O Non?

Libertex Recensioni – È Libertex Trading Broker TRUFFA O Non? | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
Libertex Recensioni - È Libertex Trading Broker TRUFFA O Non? Leggi il nostro Libertex Opinioni Primo per ottenere $ 100% Libertex Fore
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How Big Data Will Transform Our Economy And Our Lives In 2015

How Big Data Will Transform Our Economy And Our Lives In 2015 | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it

The great Danish physicist Niels Bohr once observed that “prediction is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future.” Particularly in the ever-changing world of technology, today’s bold prediction is liable to prove tomorrow’s historical artifact. But thinking ahead about wide-ranging technology and market trends is a useful exercise for those of us engaged in the business of partnering with entrepreneurs and executives that are building the next great company.

Moreover, let’s face it: gazing into the crystal ball is a time-honored, end-of-year parlor game. And it’s fun.

So in the spirit of the season, I have identified five big data themes to watch in 2015. As a marketing term or industry description, big data is so omnipresent these days that it doesn’t mean much. But it is pretty clear that we are at a tipping point. The global scale of the Internet, the ubiquity of mobile devices, the ever-declining costs of cloud computing and storage, and an increasingly networked physical word create an explosion of data unlike anything we’ve seen before.

The creation of all of this data isn’t as interesting as the possible uses of it. I think 2015 may well be the year we start to see the true potential (and real risks) of how big data can transform our economy and our lives.

Big Data Terrorism

The recent Sony hacking case is notable because it appears to potentially be the first state-sponsored act of cyber-terrorism where a company has been successfully threatened under the glare of the national media. I’ll leave it to the pundits to argue whether Sony’s decision to postpone releasing an inane farce was prudent or cowardly. What’s interesting is that the cyber terrorists caused real fear to Sony by publicly releasing internal enterprise data — including salaries, email conversations and information about actual movies.

Every Fortune 2000 management team is now thinking: Is my data safe? What could happen if my company’s data is made public and how could my data be used against me? And of course, security software companies are investing in big data analytics to help companies better protect against future attacks.

Big Data Becomes a Civil Liberties Issue

Data-driven decision tools are not only the domain of businesses but are now helping Americans make better decisions about the school, doctor or employer that is best for them. Similarly, companies are using data-driven software to find and hire the best employees or choose which customers to focus on.

But what happens when algorithms encroach on people’s privacy, their lifestyle choices and their health, and get used to make decisions based on their race, gender or age — even inadvertently? Our schools, companies and public institutions all have rules about privacy, fairness and anti-discrimination, with government enforcement as the backstop. Will privacy and consumer protection keep up with the fast-moving world of big data’s reach, especially as people become more aware of the potential encroachment on their privacy and civil liberties?

Open Government Data

Expect the government to continue to make government data more “liquid” and useful – and for companies to put the data to creative use. The public sector is an important source of data that private companies use in their products and services.

Take Climate Corporation, for instance. Open access to weather data powers the company’s insurance products and Internet software, which helps farmers manage risk and optimize their fields. Or take Zillow as another example. The successful real estate media site uses federal and local government data, including satellite photography, tax assessment data and economic statistics to  provide potential buyers a more dynamic and informed view of the housing market.

Personalized Medicine

Even as we engage in a vibrant discussion about the need for personal privacy, “big data” pushes the boundaries of what is possible in health care. Whether we label it “precision medicine” or “personalized medicine,” these two aligned trends — the digitization of the health care system and the introduction of wearable devices — are quietly revolutionizing health and wellness.

In the not-too-distant future, doctors will be able to create customized drugs and treatments tailored for your genome, your activity level, and your actual health. After all, how the average patient reacts to a particular treatment regime generically isn’t that relevant; I want the single best course of treatment (and outcome) for me.

Health IT is already a booming space for investment, but clinical decisions are still mostly based on guidelines, not on hard data. Big data analytics has the potential to disrupt the way we practice health care and change the way we think about our wellness.

Digital Learning, Everywhere

With over $1.2 trillion spent annually on public K-12 and higher education, and with student performance failing to meet the expectations of policy makers, educators and employers are still debating how to fix American education. Some reformers hope to apply market-based models, with an emphasis on testing, accountability and performance; others hope to elevate the teaching profession and trigger a renewed investment in schools and resources.

Both sides recognize that digital learning, inside and outside the classroom, is an unavoidable trend. From Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) to adaptive learning technologies that personalize the delivery of instructional material to the individual student, educational technology thrives on data. From names that you grew up with (McGraw Hill, Houghton Mifflin, Pearson) to some you didn’t (Cengage, Amplify), companies are making bold investments in digital products that do more than just push content online; they’re touting products that fundamentally change how and when students learn and how instructors evaluate individual student progress and aid their development. Expect more from this sector in 2015.

Now that we’ve moved past mere adoption to implementation and utilization, 2015 will undoubtedly be big data’s break-out year.



Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:
Big Data Transform Economy , Our Lives and Our Future .
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Irina Donciu's curator insight, January 15, 2015 4:33 AM

The great Danish physicist Niels Bohr once observed that “prediction is very difficult, especially if it's about the future.”

Maryruth Hicks's curator insight, September 8, 2015 11:27 AM

Digital learning and big data in education might lead to educational reform!

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How to Create a Mindset That Will Help You to Adapt to Anything

How to Create a Mindset That Will Help You to Adapt to Anything | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
While it’s good to have aspirations for change, what many overlook is the role our inner psychology — our mindsets — play in making change possible. Unless we are open to shifting our mindsets, our…

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"While it’s good to have aspirations for change, what many overlook is the role our inner psychology — our mindsets — play in making change possible. Unless we are open to shifting our mindsets, our…"  -   /S.Y\  Creative Reflection determine your Capacity for Rethinking with New Mindset.
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Tom Wojick's curator insight, October 16, 2017 10:55 AM

There is a faulty belief that resiliency is something you are born - you either have or you don't. Resiliency is much more a mindset than we realize.

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#MasterCard Removes #Cryptocurrency #DebitCard Availability Outside #EEA. #crypto #AdvCash #banking #Europe

#MasterCard Removes #Cryptocurrency #DebitCard Availability Outside #EEA. #crypto #AdvCash #banking #Europe | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
Life has become a lot harder for people who enjoy using cryptocurrency debit cards. A few months ago, Visa announced it would suspend all crypto debit cards outside of the European Economic Area (EEA

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What  want  MasterCard  &  Visa  make  with Cryptocurrency .
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Lionel Gikonyo's curator insight, October 12, 2017 3:04 PM

"This new stance affects a lot of companies involved in the cryptocurrency debit card industry. Advcash, for example, has already informed customers that it cannot offer plastic and virtual cards to users in countries outside the EEA."

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HR Leaders: Data, Engagement and Attracting Talent Are in Key in 2017 - Workforce Magazine

HR Leaders: Data, Engagement and Attracting Talent Are in Key in 2017 - Workforce Magazine | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
Data, employee engagement and attracting talent will propel successful companies in 2017. As 2017 approaches, robots — disappointing as it may be — are not a staple in every household or workplace. At least not in the way many had hoped. However, autonomic systems are popping up in places unheard of even a decade ago. What does this mea
Via Culture Digs, Sergey Yatsenko
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This data transformation is not limited to niche areas of HR; it is all encompassing, he said. “It’s going to involve algorithms around labor and tapped success and geographic pricing and economics and the ability to compare labor, internal, external, partner-based, all in one autonomic system that defines the modern enterprise,” he said. But DeWitt said this transformation, even in its early stages, is already visible.  -   Why it's important to have an 'All Star' profile on LinkedIn. Share your knowledge and expertise.  -   */S.Y\ How is Critical Thinking Different from Analytical or Lateral Thinking? on Scoop.it. This is my Best . This is Best Content Generation.
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Big data: The next frontier for innovation, competition, and productivity | McKinsey Global Institute | Technology & Innovation | McKinsey & Company

Big data: The next frontier for innovation, competition, and productivity | McKinsey Global Institute | Technology & Innovation | McKinsey & Company | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
A McKinsey & Company Technology & Innovation article.
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Big data will become a key basis of competition, underpinning new waves of productivity growth, innovation, and consumer surplus—as long as the right policies and enablers are in place.  -  */S.Y\  Nanotechnology give New Philosophy for Science, real Application of they for Development. 
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Create Your Invisible Advantage through a Culture of Innovation !

Create Your Invisible Advantage through a Culture of Innovation ! | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
Every organization is designed to get the results it gets. Poor performance comes from a poorly designed organization. Superior results emerge when your business strategy and organization fire on all cylinders in symphonic unison. Savvy leaders shape the culture of their company to drive innovation. They know that it’s culture–the values, norms, unconscious messages, and subtle behaviors of leaders and employees–that often limits performance. These invisible forces can also lead to real business growth when they inspire employees to innovate – through new products, process improvements, and better customer experiences.

Via Fouad Bendris
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Want a Culture of Innovation? Here’s how to create an organization focused on freethinking, an entrepreneurial spirit, and sustainable value creation at all levels across all functions.  -   */S.Y\  A Permanent Creativity give " Things of Perfection", the Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom. This is New Level of Knowledge. This is Growth of Sustainable Value Creation.
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Fouad Bendris's curator insight, December 2, 2016 1:20 PM
Want a Culture of Innovation?
Here’s how to create an organization focused on freethinking, an entrepreneurial spirit, and sustainable value creation at all levels across all functions.
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Thinking outside the creative paradigm | The Media Online

Thinking outside the creative paradigm | The Media Online | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it

In 2010 the International IBM CEO survey came out with a surprise finding;it found creativity was the number one characteristic that businesses looked for in their leadership teams. That’s a big deal. As the ad industry we get excited quickly, but hold your horses! It’s not the same as putting our 20-something trained creatives at the front of the pitch. 

Creativity in the future of marketing and advertising is a far more intelligent form of creativity. If I had to let our industry down for a moment with one comment it would be this: our level of creativity is myopically focused on communication, and specific communication channels that we are ‘ok’ with. We’re ok with TV, press, and radio. We’re ok with design as communication, and very recently we became ok with digital platforms.

But are we ok with creativity for new business directions, expanded product offerings, and accessing data to uncover deep customer insights that lead to innovation? Are we ok with creativity for technology, creativity for HR, creativity for leadership matters, creativity for biofeuls? 

These latter forms of creativity need one thing that we are so reticent to do. They need us to think outside of our paradigms. Creative people don’t like to think outside of their creative boxes! That may sound like a contradiction in terms but it’s so real. I’ve worked with enough highly talented creative people over 20 years to know they can be brilliantly creative within their areas of communication expertise, and miserably uncreative when pushed outside of them.

So here’s the kicker: can our highly gifted creative people in the ad industry stretch their ability into new realms, because this is what business needs today and in the future?

Let’s call it multi-industry creativity. I believe the ad industry has the best grouping of employees to solve some of businesses biggest challenges, if only we are bold enough to tackle them, smart enough to learn again, resilient enough to push through our boundaries, and crazy enough to maybe, just maybe, tackle the forefront of where our 21st century marketplace is headed.

Strategically-led companies

Since the beginning of time (ok, just the ad industry timeline) our types of companies have been led by creative minds. Actually let me qualify that a little – I think there have been very insightful, even strategic, thinkers in all the most successful companies since the ’60s but they have never been referred to by any other classification except creative. So we have not had highly prized strategists until five or so years ago. 

The result of the past 40-50 years is that agencies and advertising as an industry have been creative-led. Creativity and creative awards are the heros in our companies. But here is the change heading into the next 40 years: we will see more and more strategic-led agencies and eventually we will start to breed strategists who love and value creativity. At the moment there is still a rub between strategists and creatives, which is a natural thing because a generation of strategists have not emerged who have worked long enough in creative environments to tune themselves into how creatives ‘work’.

So creatives do not really value strategists (I am generalising to make the point clear) but its true in most cases.

The demand for trained strategists will cause a new breed of agency person to emerge, not only in the rank and file, but at leadership levels. CEO’s who are strategy-led will in turn shift our entire industry towards this. These future-orientated advertising agencies will be known by another name. They will come out the ad industry, but they will rename this industry – to the alarm of the creatives.

What will these new companies be called, and what will our industry eventually become known as? I doubt it will be called the strat industry, but surely new names and titles will come to the fore that will add value to the global marketplace and breathe life into diverse companies and certainly…way beyond communication.


Via Charles Tiayon
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Let’s call it multi-industry creativity.   -   */S.Y\   A Multi - Level Creativity is New KIND of TRUST.  Essential Qualities Of Leadership. - Creativity, Permanent Creativity & Multi - Level Creativity. 

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, May 23, 2014 11:28 PM

In 2010 the International IBM CEO survey came out with a surprise finding;it found creativity was the number one characteristic that businesses looked for in their leadership teams. That’s a big deal. As the ad industry we get excited quickly, but hold your horses! It’s not the same as putting our 20-something trained creatives at the front of the pitch. 

Creativity in the future of marketing and advertising is a far more intelligent form of creativity. If I had to let our industry down for a moment with one comment it would be this: our level of creativity is myopically focused on communication, and specific communication channels that we are ‘ok’ with. We’re ok with TV, press, and radio. We’re ok with design as communication, and very recently we became ok with digital platforms.

But are we ok with creativity for new business directions, expanded product offerings, and accessing data to uncover deep customer insights that lead to innovation? Are we ok with creativity for technology, creativity for HR, creativity for leadership matters, creativity for biofeuls? 

These latter forms of creativity need one thing that we are so reticent to do. They need us to think outside of our paradigms. Creative people don’t like to think outside of their creative boxes! That may sound like a contradiction in terms but it’s so real. I’ve worked with enough highly talented creative people over 20 years to know they can be brilliantly creative within their areas of communication expertise, and miserably uncreative when pushed outside of them.

So here’s the kicker: can our highly gifted creative people in the ad industry stretch their ability into new realms, because this is what business needs today and in the future?

Let’s call it multi-industry creativity. I believe the ad industry has the best grouping of employees to solve some of businesses biggest challenges, if only we are bold enough to tackle them, smart enough to learn again, resilient enough to push through our boundaries, and crazy enough to maybe, just maybe, tackle the forefront of where our 21st century marketplace is headed.

Strategically-led companies

Since the beginning of time (ok, just the ad industry timeline) our types of companies have been led by creative minds. Actually let me qualify that a little – I think there have been very insightful, even strategic, thinkers in all the most successful companies since the ’60s but they have never been referred to by any other classification except creative. So we have not had highly prized strategists until five or so years ago. 

The result of the past 40-50 years is that agencies and advertising as an industry have been creative-led. Creativity and creative awards are the heros in our companies. But here is the change heading into the next 40 years: we will see more and more strategic-led agencies and eventually we will start to breed strategists who love and value creativity. At the moment there is still a rub between strategists and creatives, which is a natural thing because a generation of strategists have not emerged who have worked long enough in creative environments to tune themselves into how creatives ‘work’.

So creatives do not really value strategists (I am generalising to make the point clear) but its true in most cases.

The demand for trained strategists will cause a new breed of agency person to emerge, not only in the rank and file, but at leadership levels. CEO’s who are strategy-led will in turn shift our entire industry towards this. These future-orientated advertising agencies will be known by another name. They will come out the ad industry, but they will rename this industry – to the alarm of the creatives.

What will these new companies be called, and what will our industry eventually become known as? I doubt it will be called the strat industry, but surely new names and titles will come to the fore that will add value to the global marketplace and breathe life into diverse companies and certainly…way beyond communication.

Rescooped by Sergey Yatsenko from Leadership, Strategy & Management
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11 Rules for Critical Thinking

11 Rules for Critical Thinking | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it

A fantastic list of 11 rules from some of history’s greatest minds. These are Prospero’s Precepts and they are found in AKA Shakespeare: A Scientific Approach to the Authorship Question.


Via Emeric Nectoux
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed, second, it is violently opposed, and third, it is accepted as self-evident. (Arthur Schopenhauer)  -   */S.Y\   A Rational Mindset is Result of the Positive Critical Thinking. 

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Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, January 31, 2014 9:46 PM

#11. "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed, second, it is violently opposed, and third, it is accepted as self-evident. (Arthur Schopenhauer)"


What should I add more to this one... Not much, mmmm yes! I know what I can say: there are 10 others "quotes" as powerful as this one!


Have a look!

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Creative Thinking | How to Build Innovation

Master the strategies and processes that promote advanced creativity—from defamiliarization to syndetic thinking, from the approaches of Archimedes in his bathtub to Einstein riding his elevator of relativity. Then, learn how to decide what to pursue first now that you have all these creative ideas.

Via Alexander Crépin
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

Creative Thinking | How to Build Innovation.   -   */S.Y\  

 The Evolution of Leader. A Permanent Creativity  give "Things of Perfection",The Real Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom/. This is New Level Knowledge . 
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The 10 qualities of a successful entrepreneur

The 10 qualities of a successful entrepreneur | New  IP  of  Nano,  Nanotechnologies  for  Development . | Scoop.it
Entrepreneurship is as important as innovation for national and global economic growth. “Innovation is essential, and we need it. But the real magic starts with entrepreneurs,” according to Gallup Poll’s Jim Clifton and Sangeeta Bharadwaj Badal. “Entrepreneurs create customers. And customers, in turn, create jobs and economic growth,” they add.

Countries need thinkers and doers. “Entrepreneurship is the horse, and innovation is the cart,” Clifton and Badal explain. Creativity, ideas, discovery and innovation are one side of the growth coin – the other side is commercialisation.



Their new book, ‘Entrepreneurial StrengthsFinder,’ delves into the psychology of the entrepreneur. What are the personality characteristics and behaviours that lead to venture creation and success? Can one learn to be an entrepreneur, or is it a quality a person is born with?

The book and online questionnaire (accessible by a special code for those who buy the book) help aspiring founders answer these questions to discover their innate entrepreneurial talents along with areas of improvement for individuals and teams. The 161-page book is compact and makes for an engaging and thought-provoking read, for entrepreneurs as well as management consultants and coaches.

Just as there are tests for IQ and sports abilities, the authors advocate conducting tests on students and employees to see who are natural-born entrepreneurs and who can be nurtured to launch startups. This also has implications for transforming cities into innovation hubs; local government leadership and community activism has helped Austin become a creative hub (as compared to Albany).

“Each city has its own unique entrepreneurial talent – and each must find it, maximise it, and retain it,” Clifton and Badal advise. This can be done via testing, accelerated development programmes, specialised courses, meaningful internships and coaching.

Gallup conducted research on 2,500 entrepreneurs to understand what it takes to create a business, scale it, make profits and create jobs. The ten key talents of successful entrepreneurs are: business focus, confidence, creative thinking, delegation, determination, independence, knowledge-seeking, promotion, relationship-building and risk-taking.

Some level of talent is innate, some can be nurtured. Each of these traits can be classified in three levels: dominant, contributing and supporting. I have summarised the authors’ description of the ten talents along with challenges and action items in Table 1 below.

Table 1: 10 Talents of Successful Entrepreneurs

Via Charles Tiayon, Louis V
Sergey Yatsenko's insight:

The 10 qualities of a successful entrepreneur: which of these are your strengths?   _  */S.Y\ Essential Qualities Of Leadership. - Creativity, Permanent Creativity & Multi - Level Creativity.

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