Myths
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Myths
A traditional story concerning the early history, explaining natural or social phenomenon
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Full Moon

Some people believe pregnant woman give birth around the time of the full moon. They say that they will give birth in the couple days the full moon is present.

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Information about the Mexican Popular Legends - Explorando Mexico

Information about the Mexican Popular Legends - Explorando Mexico | Myths | Scoop.it
Article about the most famous and important legends in Mexico, La Llorona, Jeses Malverde, among others.

 

The Basilica de Guadalupe ghost

Some people visiting the new Basilica of Guadalupe at night or homeless who sleep on the stairs say they see a woman coming out of the old basilica holding a candle that doesn’t blow out in the wind or rain. She walks through the walls of the new basilica where some have seen her leave the candle as an offering , pray and then disappear. It is rumored that she is a lost soul obeying a commitment she hasn’t fulfilled.

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La llorona (real)

no tengo nada k decir esta bn gacho/////////SI ES REAL NADAMAS QUE EL SONIDO NO LO ES EL DE (HAY MIS HIJOS) TODO LO DEMAS REAL...
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¡El Cucuy!

¡El Cucuy! | Myths | Scoop.it
Currently, I am working with another artist, and our collaboration has focused on the Mexican folklore stories of El Cacuy and La Llorona.

 

The Legend of El Cucuy
El Cucuy is a mysterious shape-shifting creature who’s compared to the American Boogeyman. However, unlike the Boogeyman, El Cucuy was once human. Tales tell of a strict, widowed father who lived on a ranch in Mexico. When his children misbehaved he would lock them in a dark closet for hours.

One night, when the father left to go to town, an oil lamp fell, and the house burned to the ground with the children locked inside. Upon his return he frantically rode into the smoldering wreckage. Both he and the horse were immediately swallowed whole by the area where the closet once stood!

Today, mischievous children are warned to behave or El Cucuy will come to get them. A simple, "Uy Cucuy" is enough to get the naughtiest of children to stop in their tracks.

Children ward off El Cucuy with a chant:
UY CUCUY! UY CUCUY! NO ES MUY-MUY!
SALTE! SALTE! POR DONDE ENTRASTE!

Translation: (Uy Cucuy! Uy Cucuy! You're not so bad! Get out! Get out! By where you entered!)

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Folktales of Mexico - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Folktales of Mexico - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Myths | Scoop.it

Pregnant woman and the Eclipse
In Mexico it is believed that exposure of a pregnant woman to an eclipse will cause her infant to have a cleft lip or palate.

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El Chupacabra - A Mysterious Creature

El Chupacabra - A Mysterious Creature | Myths | Scoop.it
The Chupacabra has been sighted recently in South America. But what is it?
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Information about the Mexican Popular Legends - Explorando Mexico

Information about the Mexican Popular Legends - Explorando Mexico | Myths | Scoop.it
Article about the most famous and important legends in Mexico, La Llorona, Jeses Malverde, among others.

 

La Llorona

According to legend, during the Colonial era, a woman used to cry screams of anguish “¡Ay, mis hijos!”. Every midnight, her wailing ghost dressed in white used to disappear among the mist of Texcoco Lake. This legend could have originated from the story of a woman who had three children with a Spanish gentleman, but he married a Spanish lady. Upon knowing this, la Llorona lost her mind and drowned her three children, then committing suicide. Since then, her soul wails for them. Another version indicates la Llorona is the soul of La Malinche, who suffers for having betrayed Mexicans during the Conquest.

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