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Titanic Survivor | Mr William Clark | Encyclopedia Titanica

Titanic Survivor | Mr William Clark  | Encyclopedia Titanica | My Research Workspace 13 | Scoop.it
Encyclopedia Titanica biography of William Clark
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William Clark, 39, was born in 1876 in Greenore, County Louth, Ireland.

A newspaper report in 1914 suggested he had served during the Boer War.

In 1911 he was listed living at 30 Paget St, Southampton with his (?common-law) wife, Mary Jane Humphrey1.

When he signed-on to the Titanic, on 6 April 1912 he gave his address as 30 Paget Street, (Southampton). His last ship had been the Avon. As a fireman he received monthly wages of £6.

Clark was rescued in Lifeboat 15.

He seems to have moved to Liverpool. 

He would also survive the sinking of the Empress of Ireland in 1914.

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Dictionary of Irish Biography - Cambridge University Press

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Individual true biographical stories of surviving passengers on the Titanic

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Features Editor's comment, September 27, 2013 3:52 PM
Great - give me some details - cut and paste excerpts from the article and post them as comments/insights
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The fate of the Irish aboard the Titanic - Independent.ie

The fate of the Irish aboard the Titanic - Independent.ie | My Research Workspace 13 | Scoop.it
The Titanic, which sank on the 15th April 1912 with the loss of over 1,500 lives, was built, crewed and travelled on for the most part by Irish...
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Greater look into the life of William Clarke for Louth who survived the Titanic, what he went on to do etc


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A History of Ireland in 100 Objects – 89. ‘Titanic’ launch ticket, 1911

A History of Ireland in 100 Objects – 89. ‘Titanic’ launch ticket, 1911 | My Research Workspace 13 | Scoop.it
That such a world-beating ship was created in an Irish city was astonishing. But then Belfast was a new kind of Irish place.
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Titanic - how it influenced history

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Features Editor's comment, September 27, 2013 3:44 PM
Great scoop - this is a nice mircocosm for how migration operated across the Atlantic. Keep up the gpood work.