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Rescooped by Cheneya Terrahn from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
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Extreme weather could become norm around Indian Ocean | New Scientist.com

Extreme weather could become norm around Indian Ocean | New Scientist.com | My Page | Scoop.it

What do the torrential rains that swept across a swathe of East Africa in 1997 have in common with the record-breaking drought that Australia has just emerged from? Both can be blamed on El Niño's Indian Ocean sibling.

 

A study looking at how climate change will affect this ocean oscillation pattern has predicted that if the world is allowed to warm uncontrollably, these kinds of extreme events will become the norm by 2050.

 

The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) is an oscillation of warm water across the equator. In the oscillation's positive phase, sea surface temperatures in the Arabian Sea rise whereas temperatures around Sumatra, Indonesia, fall. In the negative phase, it's the other way around.

 

As well as being blamed for Australia's recent dry spell and the 1997 East African storms, the IOD's positive phase has been linked to droughts in Australia and dry weather in Indonesia over the last 6500 years, according to a 2007 study of fossilised coral. The study also concluded that positive events are becoming more frequent, with an unprecedented 11 occurrences over the past 30 years.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by Cheneya Terrahn from The Asian Food Gazette.
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The Arrival of Hamsi Season in Istanbul

The Arrival of Hamsi Season in Istanbul | My Page | Scoop.it
Fall marks the start of hamsi season, when small anchovies fill fishing nets on the Black Sea coast, squirming their way – with all the country’s anticipation – onto plates throughout Turkey.

Via Frank Kusters
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Comment: How children's literature shapes attitudes to Asia

Comment: How children's literature shapes attitudes to Asia | My Page | Scoop.it
By Kerry Mallan, Queensland University of Technology; Amy Cross, Queensland University of Technology, and Cherie Allan, Queensland University of Technology

Via Ana Margarida Ramos
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Rescooped by Cheneya Terrahn from Fuji X-Pro1
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Asia 2013 Part 7 :: All That Glitters Is Not Gold | Derek Clark

Asia 2013 Part 7 :: All That Glitters Is Not Gold | Derek Clark | My Page | Scoop.it


Sometimes life takes us by the hand and helps us to see what otherwise might be missed. It shows you one thing to allow you to see another. You might not realise it at the time, you might not realise it until after it happens, but the aha moment shows it’s face and makes you wonder just how the universe nudges us one way or another as we stumble through life.  The divide between rich and poor was projected on the walls of  shops and houses, but first I would be taken on an unexpected journey with the Chinese workers of Taipa and Macau. I woke early and slipped out of the hotel room with my shoes in my hand and my camera bag over my shoulder. This was fast becoming my MO, up early and out either before, or as the sun comes up, leaving the others to sleep. I slipped my shoes on and stepped into the elevator and hit G. The lobby was empty, nobody on the desk and nobody on the door. I stepped outside and felt the Asian heat hanging from the night before. The sun had just came up, but was nothing more than a bright spot in the thick fog. I was in Taipa, but  I has heading to Macau, the Chinese gambling capital......


Via Thomas Menk
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