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Article4: Mining, fly-in, fly-out workers and the risk of suicide

Article4: Mining, fly-in, fly-out workers and the risk of suicide | My OHS Life and that of my colleagues | Scoop.it
Barely a week passes without media coverage of some aspect of the real or perceived impacts of fly-in fly-out (FIFO) and drive-in drive-out (DIDO) work, especially in the mining sector. We hear about the…
Justice Chinorumba's insight:

Social isolation, family or financial stress and high risk-taking behaviour, those are three proven risk factors predominant in an age and gender cohort already pre-disposed to suicide.

 
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Article 2: The FIFO Worker Stress

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This article shows how much can be done to alleviate and try in any reasonable practicable way to minimise any health issues and improve the health of fly-in fly-out worker ('FIFO). 

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The fly-in fly-out Worker.

The fly-in fly-out Worker. | My OHS Life and that of my colleagues | Scoop.it
A YOUNG fly-in, fly-out worker who took his life in the Pilbara left a suicide note that said West Australians “don’t know what it’s like to work FIFO and have depression”.
Justice Chinorumba's insight:

As billions of dollars is invested in new mining projects and a government inquiry looks into the increasing use of FIFO workers. Fly-in fly-out workers have high levels of lifestyle-related health risks such as drinking, smoking and being overweight, a study by the WA Department of Health has found. The working patterns have been shown to disrupt sleep, lead to depression, poor mental health, increase the risk of peptic ulcers, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes, researchers note in the Internal Medicine Journal (online July 25, 2014). According to Western Australia health surveillance system, when compared with 913 shift workers and 10,613 people otherwise employed in WA, 380 FIFOs identified in the study using data from the this system exhibited more health problems than others.

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The Mechanic's World

Justice Chinorumba's insight:

Diesel mechanics repair and maintain diesel fuel powered vehicles and machines, such as buses, heavy trucks, trains, and boats. There has been always an attraction to the profession due to the wages paid to bus and truck mechanics and other diesel engine specialists. In this profession there are always hazards associated with it,  Diesel mechanics frequently have to lift heavy parts and maneuver them into place, move heavy equipment into position to reach vehicles they're working on. In addition, there is lots of manual handling issues when accessing some parts requires twisting, bending, stretching or stooping. Such contortions, combined with the lifting required, can lead to back and muscle pain, fatigue and injuries. Parts are often greasy or slippery, hot and sharp edges making it harder to grasp them securely, and losing your grip can cause injuries to your handsS, toes and other body parts. Some work environments might be hot, cold, drafty, smelly or noisy hence increased hazards and other health risks. Diesel fumes are hazardous as well, the fuel might contain additives, which are carcinogenic these include benzene. Long-term exposure to diesel fumes can also damage the kidneys and make it harder for the blood to clot.

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The Miner

The Miner | My OHS Life and that of my colleagues | Scoop.it

The principal airborne hazards in the mining industry include several types of particulates, naturally occurring gases, engine exhaust and some chemic...

Justice Chinorumba's insight:

Mining has always been among the most hazardous of occupations, and with the increasing demand for coal, iron ore and other minerals safety in mines assumes even greater importance. As we all know mining has always been a backbone of Australia's economy this means there is a greater number of people employed in this sector. The hazards in mining sector are not limited to the following: accidents, dust (including poisoning by certain ores), high temperature and humidity, noise and vibration, toxic gases. This vast array of hazards in the world of mining is caused by heavy equipment, long working hours and difficult working conditions, and personnel with varying skill and educational levels are commonplace. Underground mine risks include ventilation challenges, to structural safety In surface mines, safety risks are also easily identifiable, and include landslides and flooding. Organisations and companies, relevant stakeholders, government institutions and departments are working hard to implement best safe systems of work that will create a safe working environment for the mining industry. Regardless of all this employees still get affected with these hazards and risks associated with this industry.

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Article 5 Feasibility Study ofFly in fly out Workers

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This article  show s evidence of mental health issues facing workers  doing fly in fly out arrangements

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Article 3: FIFO Report

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This shows how much fly in fly out affect families, relationships and other socio economic impacts on the economy as a whole. It gives us clear statistical data giving a clear picture how this work industry is affecting us (as I am also part of this industry). Companies and other related organisations are doing their best to reduce the risk by employing systems that manages the effects.

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My Damsel: Article 1 Work-related stress.

My Damsel: Article 1 Work-related stress. | My OHS Life and that of my colleagues | Scoop.it
Work-related stress has many causes, including long hours, heavy workload, job insecurity, the threat of job loss or redundancy, and conflicts with other workers or bosses. Symptoms of work-related stress may include depression, anxiety, a drop in work performance, feelings of being overwhelmed, fatigue, headaches and an increase in sick days or absenteeism. Companies and employers should recognise work-related stress as a significant health and safety issue.
Justice Chinorumba's insight:

Work-related stress is a pattern of reactions that occurs when workers are presented with work or job demands and situations of various kinds, which threaten their ability to cope. When there is a perceived imbalance between demands and the resources (personal and environmental) available to cope with them, the worker’s reactions may include the following physiological responses (increased heart rate, blood pressure, hyperventilation), emotional responses (nervousness or irritated), cognitive responses (reduction or narrowing of attention and perception, forgetfulness) and behavioural reactions (aggressiveness, impulsive behaviour and making mistakes). This article will provide us with information on how to manage work related stress, as it might not well be linked to a group of people I want to talk about, which is fly in fly out workers, work related stress is everywhere and the principles to tackle it are all the same.

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The City Bus Drivers

The City Bus Drivers | My OHS Life and that of my colleagues | Scoop.it
The job has long been one of the most stressful and hazardous gigs in town.
Justice Chinorumba's insight:

Dozens of studies and researches conducted over the last four decades in cities on almost every continent show and suggest that bus drivers, when compared to workers in other jobs, are more likely to experience:
a) Death from heart and blood vessel disease and other heart and blood vessel-related conditions such as chest pain and high blood pressure;
b) Digestive disorders; and
c) Musculoskeletal problems, especially of the back, neck and shoulders.
d) Bus drivers frequently report tension, mental overload, fatigue and sleeping problems.

 

There is a large proportion of the work absences are attributable to stress-related disorders such as digestive problems and anxiety. Stress is believed to play a significant role in causing heart diseases in bus drivers. Typically, stressful jobs are those which have high psychological demands and little decision-making control, in combination with low social support on the job. Bus driving, the job itself is solitary with little chance for face-to-face contact between co-workers and the work schedule disrupts family and social life.

 

There are few measures in place trying to alleviate issues associated with this profession and these include:
a) Reduce traffic congestion thus bus lanes and signal priority
b) Reduce passenger inquiries such as automated information systems
c) Enhance driver security such as fence or guard around the drive, alarm systems and emergency procedures
d) Reduce social isolation on the job for example schedule breaks in central locations
e) Reduce fatigue and interference with personal life such as use of improved work schedules
f) Improve social aspects of work thus supportive style of leadership
g) Improve ergonomic design of buses such as seat design and steering wheel design.

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The Tree Carer

Justice Chinorumba's insight:

Arboriculture is the science or art of tree care and is carried out by arborists in an urban environment. Arborists promote tree health, discern tree problems and take measures to correct them, they also maintain and protect trees in urban settings such as parks, reserves, schools and gardens. Too many of these workers in the tree-felling or tree-care industry are being hurt or killed by well-known industry dangers that can be prevented if employers take the necessary precautions. My insight is a person conducting a business or undertaking has the primary duty under the WHS Act to ensure, so as far is as reasonably practicable, that workers and other persons are not exposed to health and safety risks arising from the business or undertaking. This includes providing training and making sure workers have the right tools to stay safe.

 

The following list of safety precautions employers can use before they begin any tree-care, trimming and felling operations

a) Assess the worksite for fall and falling-object hazards.
b) Have a qualified arborist survey the worksite.
c) Determine if workers will need to climb or use aerial lifts.
d) Establish drop zones where there is a hazard of falling objects.
e) Take steps to protect workers from falling-object hazards.
f) Establish visual and audible communications with overhead and ground workers.
g) Have emergency procedures in place.

 

The is a Code of Practice that has been developed by Safe Work Australia as a model code of practice under the Council of Australian Governments’ Inter-Governmental Agreement for Regulatory and Operational Reform in Occupational Health and Safety for adoption by the Commonwealth, state and territory governments. Employers and employees should refer to such documentation so as to set a benchmark when it comes to safety in the industry.

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