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Astucieux : ils inventent la ruche connectée - Pepsnews - L'actu positive

Astucieux : ils inventent la ruche connectée - Pepsnews - L'actu positive | My Humanity | Scoop.it
BeeZbee est une start -up qui vient de mettre au point une ruche qui va faciliter la vie des apiculteurs .La société Green & Connect conçoit et commercialise des balances autonomes et communicantes qui, placées sous les ruches, sont capables de transmettre des mesures de poids, d’hygrométrie et de température. Ces données permettent à l’apiculteur …

Via Florence Brunet-Chauveau
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Honeyinstruments - Création de l'espace personnel et ajout de la première balance

Vidéo pour les nouveaux utilisateurs de la balance pour ruche Honey instruments. Cette vidéo explique comment créer un compte sur honeyinstruments.com e
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Label Abeilles, un boitier connecté pour lutter contre la disparition ... - Francetv info

Label Abeilles, un boitier connecté pour lutter contre la disparition ... - Francetv info | My Humanity | Scoop.it
Pour lutter contre la disparition des abeilles, un jeune entrepreneur orléanais a mis au point un concept de ruches connectées.

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HoneyInstruments - Installation et utilisation d'une balance pour ruche

Vidéo d'installation de la balance pour ruche HoneyInstruments utilisant la technologie SIGFOX.
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HoneyInstruments scales for hives | Sigfox Partner Network

HoneyInstruments scales for hives | Sigfox Partner Network | My Humanity | Scoop.it
Connected scales for hives
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Honey Bees Rapidly Evolve to Overcome New Disease - OIST (2015)

Honey Bees Rapidly Evolve to Overcome New Disease - OIST (2015) | My Humanity | Scoop.it

An international research team has some good news for the struggling honeybee, and the millions of people who depend on them to pollinate crops and other plants.

These valuable pollinators have faced widespread colony losses over the past decade, largely due to the spread of a predatory mite called Varroa destructor. But the bees might not be in as dire a state as it seems... Researchers found a population of wild bees from around Ithaca, New York, which is as strong today as ever, despite the mites invading the region in the mid-1990s.

“They took a hit, but they recovered,” said Alexander Mikheyev... lead paper author. “The population appears to have developed genetic resistance.” Mikheyev and his collaborators... studied the population genetics of the wild colony by comparing the DNA of specimens collected in 1977 with bees collected from the same forest in 2010...

Such a study is extremely rare, especially with bees. Few people collect them, and even fewer collect in a way that is good enough for a population level study... This is the first time scientists have been able to observe genome-wide changes after a specific event like the mite invasion... “we see how evolution happens as compared to how we think it happens”... 

Many people think of evolution happening over thousands or millions of years, but in fact, it is happening from generation to generation. External forces cause certain traits to be selected and passed on to offspring to enhance their chance of survival and reproduction. By comparing bees from the same colony only a few decades a part, the team was able to see this natural selection in action.

The bees changed in several different ways. First, mitochondrial DNA... changed significantly... That genetic material is only passed on from the mothers, so a major change indicates the old queen bees were wiped out and there were large-scale population losses. Even so, the population still maintained a high level of genetic diversity throughout the rest of genome, which is stored in the cell nucleus... 

One of the most interesting changes in the bee population was in a gene related to a dopamine receptor... has suggested this receptor is involved with bees grooming themselves to get rid of the mites by chewing them up. 

The researchers also found many changes in genes associated with development. Mites reproduce and feed on the bee during the bees’ larval stage, so the researchers hypothesize that bees evolved to disrupt that process. Also, there were physical changes – today’s bees are smaller than the older bees and their wing shape is different.

The researchers note changes observed cannot be prescribed to any one factor, such as the mites... However, many of the changes are too large to be due to random genetic fluctuations, or the introduction of genes from other sources...

“These findings identify candidate genes that could be used for breeding more resistant bees... More importantly, it suggests the importance of maintaining high levels of genetic diversity in domestic bee stocks, which may help overcome future diseases.”

 

http://www.oist.jp/news-center/news/2015/8/18/honey-bees-rapidly-evolve-overcome-new-disease

 

Original article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms8991

 


Via Alexander J. Stein
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