OHS in the Workplace of 5 of my friends
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Rescooped by Joelene Gott from OHS within Ambulance Services... allowing Paramedics to continue to serve.
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QUEST 3 - Spate of paramedic suicides rocks ambulance service

QUEST 3 - Spate of paramedic suicides rocks ambulance service | OHS in the Workplace of 5 of my friends | Scoop.it
Victorian ambulance workers have been left reeling after an increase in the number of paramedics committing suicide, with eight paramedics in the past three years taking their own lives.Ambulance Emp.

Via Justin Stewart
Joelene Gott's insight:

This article talks about the increasing numbers of suicide in paramedics.  

 

It talks about how a welfare panel should be in place for paramedics and more funding and training made available along with more welfare support to help deal with the pressures of the job.

 

The article briefly talks about how paramedics see things that no other person could imagine or want to see and it is these images that can leave scars on the paramedics and if not dealt with can lead to the unthinkable action of suicide.

 

John and his work colleagues are at a risk of this occurring to them also.  They need to make sure that they seek help when they are feeling uneasy or out of sorts from a job.  They need to made aware of what is available to them if they require assistance.

 

John works on the flight chopper ask so he sees a number of things that everyday people would not.  That along with fatigue that was previously mentioned in another topic is a recipe for depression and possible suicide if there isn't welfare support and procedures put in place to deal with such issues.

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Justin Stewart's curator insight, March 12, 2014 10:45 PM

Studying Mental Health as one of my courses this year, as well as doing prac within the area that I've grown up in, it has opened my eyes to the amount of suicide and parasuicide that affects people who would appear perfectly healthy and content from the outside. As a paramedic we see people at their worst, and we are privileged in that patients open up about their darkest secrets to us. Our job is not to judge but to get these patients the help that they need. It is sobering to think that it can just as easily happen to someone within the Ambulance Service, depression cycles can be invisible unless the victim wishes it to be known.

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QUEST 3 - Assaults on ambulance officers on the rise (Vic)

QUEST 3 - Assaults on ambulance officers on the rise (Vic) | OHS in the Workplace of 5 of my friends | Scoop.it

THE number of ambulance officers being bashed by drunks is soaring.


Via ReGenUC
Joelene Gott's insight:

This article discusses the sad truth about paramedics becoming victims of assault more often than not.

 

it talks about a particular paramedic that has been assaulted on numerous occasions and that the attacks on paramedics are becoming more frequent and have in some incidences been very serious.

 

This is something Joh and every paramedic has to deal with.  They are regularly called to drunk, intoxicated, under the influence of drugs or even mental health patient that are off their medications.  Although they are there to assist and help the person, sometimes this is not how the patient sees it, even more so under the influence and this is when paramedics are assaulted.

 

Within the Queensland Ambulance Service there is a program that has been designed to teach paramedics how to get out of situations that can become dangerous.  The program is called SAFE and it is a self defence type course.  It is a requirement of every paramedic within the service to complete this training.

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QUEST 3 - The exploration of physical fatigue, sleep an depression in paramedics: a pilot study


Via Krystle Walters
Joelene Gott's insight:

This journal article discuss the issues of fatigue in paramedics.  They have conducted a research on 60 paramedics.

 

It refers to paramedicine as a unique part of emergency services and that paramedics are prehospital responders and are often faced with heavy workloads that are both demanding and tiring not only physically but mentally and emotionally.

 

Paramedics are also often fatigued and occur sleep disturbances on a regular basis.  The article describes how this can compromise the paramedics effectiveness and therefor not only endanger the patient but can be harmful/damaging to the paramedics health and well being.

 

John could help avoid this is as best he can by making sure that he attempts to get as much sleep as possible before he works a night shift and that he has a healthy life style.  For example eating healthy and exercising regularly.  He needs to make sure he has a balance been work and home life so as he doesn't burn himself out very quickly.

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Krystle Walters's curator insight, March 13, 2014 5:27 AM

Working as paramedic in a rural area, shift requirements include A & E shifts. These shifts are on call shifts and frequently involve broken sleep. This lack of solid sleep can not only lead to physical injuries due to lack of concentration, but also to psychological issues including depression.

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Phlebotomy Training Manager

Phlebotomy Training Manager | OHS in the Workplace of 5 of my friends | Scoop.it

This is a good friend of mine who is also my boss.  She is the training manager up at the Townsville Hospital for Phlebotomy

Joelene Gott's insight:

Phelbotomist face many risk within their job.  They deal with needles everyday and there is the potential for needle stick injuries on a daily basis.  They deal with many different sick people also so there is a risk of contamination from these sick individuals.

 

The phelbotomists at the Townsville hospital also conduct rounds on the wards, so they are continually dealing with a wide range of different illnesses and injuries within each ward.  this poses a potential risk to the phlebotomists as cross contamination can occur.  Patients with head injuries  also pose a potential risk as the sometimes wave there arms around and thrash about so this is a huge risk when dealing with needles.

 

Along with having to take blood everyday phlebotomists have to deal with the stress of heavy work loads and minimal times to get the jobs done.  

 

They have to deal with patients that are aggressive and non compliant to having there bloods taken so this is an added stress to the phlebotomists as the doctors have ordered the bloods but the patients arent compliant.

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Hairdressing

Hairdressing | OHS in the Workplace of 5 of my friends | Scoop.it

This is one of my closets friends and she owns her own hairdressing salon

Joelene Gott's insight:

Hairdressers work with sharp scissors and there is the potential for cuts and nicks to the fingers and hands.  

 

Hairdressers are also on there feet 90% of the day this can potentially lead to back injuries, and/or leg problems.

 

Hairdressers also work with chemicals when they are bleaching, dying or chemically straightening clients hair.  This poses a hazard as the could receive chemical burns or inhalation issues if the correct personal protective equipment wasn't worn.

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QUEST 3 - Importance of Health: 5 Quick Facts About Bloodborne Pathogens

Joelene Gott's insight:

This article discusses the importance of using universal precautions and correct techniques when dealing with patient that are infected.

 

It talks about bloodbourne pathogens and how it can be spread through direct/indirect contact, through droplet transmission.  It can also be spread through contact of equipment that has been used from a patient that is infected.

 

There is also the risk of needle stick injuries with patients and having to deal with contaminated bodily fluids.

 

John is at risk of this almost everyday he turns up to work. He deals with patients on a daily basis and is not always aware of there status.  He also cannulates and gives intramuscular injections to patients so is at risk of needle stick injuries.

 

It is Johns and his work colleagues responsibility to maintain their competencies on how to use these devices, it is also up to them to make the right judgement call when it comes to placing themselves in danger if they were to attempt a cannulation or intramuscular injection in a patient that is combative.  John can make sure he keeps up with his training and it is with this training and continual learning and up skilling that these incidences can be reduced.

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QUEST - 3 Health and Safety information - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland

QUEST - 3 Health and Safety information - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland | OHS in the Workplace of 5 of my friends | Scoop.it
Joelene Gott's insight:

This government website statistics on the percentages of most common injuries within the paramedic industry.

It identifies that back injuries are common injuries with paramedics with injuries being joint and muscle sprains and strains caused by manual handling of patients.


Within the paramedic service it is a rule that you do not manually handle a patient on your own.  That includes assisting/holding up a patient while they walk, assisting a patient out of a chair or up stairs.  This also includes and is the most important of them all you do not lift a patient on your own, wether that be from the floor to the stretcher or lifting the stretcher with the patient on it.


John and other paramedics must make sure they are aware of all manual handling guidelines and continue to do training on lifting and manual handling as this will help lower the potential risk of injuries.

 

 

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Flight Paramedic

Flight Paramedic | OHS in the Workplace of 5 of my friends | Scoop.it

This is one of my good friends  He is an ACPII that does higher duties on the rescue chopper

Joelene Gott's insight:

Fatigue is potential risk with paramedics as they work split shifts, extra shifts and sometimes have to work over time.  If there isnt enough rest time between shifts this could open up the potential of accidents to occur.

 

Manual lifting is something paramedics do on a daily basis.  Back injuries are one of the highest claims for compensation with paramedics.  Correct lifting techniques should be followed at all times wether it be into an ambulance or into a helicopter.

 

Noise is something to consider when working on the rescue chopper.  Hearing protection should be worn at all times while chopper is operating.

 

Paramedics are always working with needles and sharp objects so this can cause a potential for needle stick injuries.  This is a greater risk while working on the rescue chopper as you are in a confined space that is moving and is very noisy.

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Nurses

Nurses | OHS in the Workplace of 5 of my friends | Scoop.it

These are 2 of my friends that work in the cardiac ward at Townsville hospital

Joelene Gott's insight:

Nurses are many potential risks and hazards in there day to day job.  They are working with needles and sharp objects so this poses risks of needle stick injuries.

 

Fatigue is a hazard as nurses work split shifts, including night work, over time and working back on a shift.  This can cause a person to become tired, run down and fatigued.  If this occurs it then poses a risk not only to the nurses but to there patients also.

 

Cross contamination is a big risk with nurses.  These two ladies work within the cardiac ward and are constantly dealing with bodily fluids and changing of and cleaning of wounds and dressings.

 

They are at risk of injuring themselves from manual handling.  They roll patients, shower patients and help patients in and out of bed on a daily basis.  If this is not done using the correct technique they can potentially end up with injured backs.

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Personal Trainer

Personal Trainer | OHS in the Workplace of 5 of my friends | Scoop.it

This is my sister she is a personal trainer at one of our local gyms

Joelene Gott's insight:

Being a personal trainer has several different potential  OHS issues.

 

Trips and Falls are things that pose a hazard while working in a gym.  Gyms are usually very busy with a lot of equipment squeezed into a small space and room between each piece of equipment is minimal.  There is also electrical cords laying on the ground that run from the machines. Most people that are working out have head phones on and are concentrating on what they are going to do next and this means they have less focus on what is around them.  This can cause them to trip or fall on cords, machinery or even other people when its busy.

 

Physical injury is a big one within a gym.  There are alot of machines and if not used correctly people can sustain injuries from them.  There  is also a risk if the machinery is not maintained correctly and up to standards.

 

Cross contamination is another risk while at the gym.  As mentioned previously gyms can become very busy and that means a lot of people using the same machines as others.  If someone does not bring a towel and/or wipe the machinery after they have used it there is a potential for a cross contaminations from that machine.

 

Dehydration is a huge risk associated with working in a gym.  Gyms are usually air conditioned to keep things cool, however when working out your core body temperature increases causing you to sweat.  If you are not replacing this by drinking water you are potentially going to become dehydrated.

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