music producing
13 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by John Bosack
Scoop.it!

HowStuffWorks "How Multitrack Recording Works"

HowStuffWorks "How Multitrack Recording Works" | music producing | Scoop.it
Multitrack recording is a process in the music recording field. Find out how multitrack recording works in this article from HowStuffWorks.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Bosack
Scoop.it!

Audio Engineering Career Information and Job Duties

Audio Engineering Career Information and Job Duties | music producing | Scoop.it
Individuals searching for audio engineering career found the following resources, articles, links, and information helpful.
John Bosack's insight:

Audio engineers are always on the move, working at a studio at a radio,television or live set or even from their house..  These many places can book an audio engineer to fix, edit or record music for a tv show commercial or movie, on top of producing lp's for a band or artist.Job is expected to grow 6 percent  in the next 4 years.

 

"

audio engineers work with complex electrical equipment. Soundboards, equalizers, microphones, recording equipment, mixing consoles and editing software are the audio engineer's tools.....in adddition to possessing technical skills, audio engineers must be able to work well under pressure. They also need to be good listeners and communicators so they can distinguish and deliver the sound that an artist or producer is trying to achieve."

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Bosack
Scoop.it!

Indie Record Label Economics | KnowTheMusicBiz.com

Indie Record Label Economics | KnowTheMusicBiz.com | music producing | Scoop.it
An inside look at the economic structure of a typical indie record label recording contract.
John Bosack's insight:
this article shows the economic expenses a record company must endure just to produce a record. "Recording advance: $15,000 Tour support: $2,100 Mastering costs: $934.96 Marketing: $13,433.23 Advertising: $2,067.50 Publicity: $5,153.34 Manufacturing: $16,581.04 Artwork / photos: $200 Misc: $587.71 Total: $56,057.78 Here is an overview of each of the line item in a little more detail: Recording Advance – The money for the recording advance is used to cover the cost of recording. Including studio rental, mixing, session musicians, sound engineer and producer. Tour Support – Artists have traditionally sold more overall units when they tour so record labels will often times financially support a tour. Tour support money can help pay some of the expenses of touring such as gas, insurance, hotels, food and supplies. Mastering – Mastering is a post production process that takes the final mix of the recording, edits minor flaws, adjusts volume and stereo widths, equalizes tracks, etc. It’s usually expected that the person who masters the recording will be different from the person who mixes it so there is typically a separate line item in the budget. Marketing – The marketing line item is entirely for retail co-op marketing expenses. Co-op marketing dollars are expenses distributors incur from retailers for special product placement, in-store promotions, listening stations or advertising. The amount of co-op marketing dollars the distributor (and ultimately the label) are willing to spend on a new release has a direct correlation to the amount of product the retailer orders. Advertising – Advertising expenses can include any print, radio and online advertising the record label incurs to promote a new release (outside of retail co-op dollars). Publicity – It’s fairly common for a record label to hire an independent publicist for a 90 day period to help promote a new release to press, print and online media, bloggers and anyone else who can help influence music fans. Manufacturing – The manufacturing costs for a CD with jewel case can vary but is still around $1.00 per unit for a distributor or label with measurable volume. Artwork – The cost of custom creative and / or photos for the release. Miscellaneous – Just like the name implies this is the catch “everything else” expense category related to a new release. For example, legal fees or video production expenses charged to a new release could end up here. For this particular release to break even it must generate $70,072.23 in gross sales ($56,057.78 + the 25% fee of sales paid to the distributor). The typical deductions a distributor takes on sales including return reserves and breakage (to name a few) further impact cash flow on sales back to the record label. It’s important for artists to fully understand how the basic economics of an indie label work since they will not get paid any royalties from sales until the record label recoups all the expenses incurred in getting the record to market. This is true of both traditional record label agreements and even “50/50” licensing agreements. It is very common for artists to never receive royalties on sales from their record label since many new releases never fully recoup their expenses. Being signed to a record label is no guarantee of sales success. Artists need to carefully weigh what a record label is going to spend on a new release to determine the level of sales that will be needed to achieve profitability before signing a recording contract. Even though the artist might sell a lower number of units on their own there is a very real chance they can actually earn more money without a record label being involved. Most indie record label owners are simply trying to get music they love heard by fans. They aren’t in it for the money. In addition to the above mentioned costs of getting a new release to market they have to cover multiple other expenses such as insurance, rent, payroll, travel and mechanical royalties. Making money as an indie label is no easy task. Needless to say, label owners give it a great deal of consideration before signing a new artist and committing to releasing their music. It does take a lot of money and resources to get a new release to market. However, real transparency in accounting for these expenses is still largely lacking. Inevitably this leads to conflict between the record label and artist around recoupment of expenses and payment of royalties. Hopefully, as artists better understand the economics of record labels they will be able to make more informed decisions about when it makes more sense to sign with a record label or go it alone."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Bosack
Scoop.it!

Music Technology: A Timeline

Music Technology: A Timeline | music producing | Scoop.it
From wax cylinders to digital multitrack systems, a history of the cutting edge in sound.
John Bosack's insight:

this gives a timeline of the advancements in the audio technology industry



"960-69: Music III-V software synthesis with unit generators; algorithmic composition programs byIannis Xenakis (Stochastic Music Program) and G. M. Koenig (Project 1); Moog and Buchla synthesizers

Early 1970s: Experimental digital audio recorders; Mellotron; early algorithmic microprocessor-controlled synthesis systems (David Behrman, Martin Bartlett); algorithmic composition program by Barry Truax (POD)

1971: Xenakis publishes Formalized Music

1977: First commercial digital audio recording system, Sony PCM-1; Synclavier sampling instrument

1979: Fairlight Computer Music Instrument

1981: E-Mu Emulator

1982: Compact Disc

1983: MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface); Yamaha DX7, digital FM synthesis

1984: Cmix by Paul Lansky at Princeton University

1986: Csound by Barry Vercoe & R. Karstens at MIT

1988: Max created by Miller Puckette at IRCAM (Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique/Musique)

Late 1980s: High-quality digital audio work stations for personal computers

Early 1990s: Digital multitrack systems"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Bosack
Scoop.it!

The BluePrint For A Successful Record Label

The BluePrint For A Successful Record Label | music producing | Scoop.it
With iTunes Sales rocketing to the moon and continuous clips of Lady Gaga, Pitbull, T-Pain, Katy Perry, Adele etc... playing on your TV set day in and day out its hard not to be influenced in being part of the fun and wild Music Industry. You have the talent, you have access to a recording studio and you have learnt a thing or two about uploading your music to your Myspace page. This nowadays is not enough, we show you the BluePrint formula used to create a Successful Record Label.
John Bosack's insight:

many record companies started off as a fail, just like many other buisnesses.  The first big problem producers run into is not having the proper money to finish a album or even not enough to keep the studio up and running.  Another proble often faced is finding talent that can make money for you.  You should know the genre you want to produce, to find the show promoters and a fan base in the area.

Next you will need money to press the record to a cd and to distribute your product, to get people to buy.  YOu need to advertise to get your product out and sold, so you make money in return.

more...
No comment yet.