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Spotify hacking: how is it changing the music industry, who is to blame, and what is the solution?

Spotify hacking: how is it changing the music industry, who is to blame, and what is the solution? | Music Industry | Scoop.it
Spotify hacking is a much larger industry than anyone ever anticipated, yet nobody is stepping up to bat to police it. Who is to blame, and how do we solve it?
Rachel Siteman's insight:

Music-spamming is a concept I didn't even know existed before reading this article. Apparently there is a massive amount of tech-savvy people who are attempting to make money off the digital distribution of music or just mess with it altogether. Who would have thought there are people on the internet with malicious intent and a taste for destruction? Hah. Funny joke. 

 

Apparently what is going on here involves a varitable slew of con artists, no pun intended, that are creating a massive problem for streaming services. Ryan Walsh, author of this article, created a typography to depict each specific style of spammer. 

 

Personally, I see a fine line between the "Cloners" and "Personalizationers" and simple fans. People like to sing covers, and upload them, and offer them for sale if they legally have the chance. People also like to create personalized tracks around the world. I would imagine there must be a gray line between these categories and simply fans who are trying to share their own versions of popular music. Similarly, I don't find the "Head-Scratcher" that troublesome. So the artist has a lot of releases, so they appeared on many collections and reissues, so what? Maybe they actually are worth listening to. 

 

However, if I was to come across a "Name Changer" or "White Noiser" while attempting to stream some decent music, I would be thoroughly ticked off. To think that people publish thousands of repeat songs with mildly different names or completely blank songs, well, its just a shame. I honestly haven't run across any of these scandalous posts yet, and I'm not entirely sure its as big a problem as the author is making it out to be, but I hope these trouble-making methods don't begin trending. Walsh makes a good point when he asks, "What happens when there's a fundamental problem facing an art form, and it absolutely needs to be resolved, but continually working on the problem starts to lessen the power of the art form itself? "

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Exploring age-specific preferences in listening

Exploring age-specific preferences in listening | Music Industry | Scoop.it
Earlier this week we looked at how gender can affect music listening preferences. In this post, we continue the tour through demographic data and explore how the age of the listener tells us someth...
Rachel Siteman's insight:

Very interesting article about popular music preferences for various age segments. I'm curious about the crossover artists whose popularity spans decades. Are there specific aspects of their music that draw this wide range of listeners? Could specific musical features be analyzed to create a sort of formula for wide-spanning success in popular music?


Also, regarding the Skrillex-Roy Orbison "Most Distinctive Artist" awards, I'm fascinated with how they found the top 100 artists that would fall to the lowest ranking for the opposite demographic regarding 13- and 64-year-olds. Paul Lamere's only application of this information was to create playlists for literally driving the other market segment out of the room. But what other implications could this information entail? 

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Skrillex Releases Surprise New Album 'Recess' Via App

Skrillex Releases Surprise New Album 'Recess' Via App | Music Industry | Scoop.it
EDM producer's 'Alien Ride' app contains new 11-song album featuring Diplo, Chance the Rapper
Rachel Siteman's insight:

In an industry that is constantly trying to shapeshift the way consumers interact with the product, Skrillex has become an addition to the list of artists getting creative with his methods of release. I love the idea of delivering his music with an interactive app and how he maintained the element of surprise. However, I do wish there would have been some continuity between the theme of the app and the music itself.

 

Strictly speaking of the music, Skrillex made a great point about genre stereotyping, going so far as to compare it to racism. He encourages people to drop all preconceptions of what types of music certain artists or groups should produce. Being a genre-jumper himself, changing from emo/punk band From First To Last to becoming a major player in the Dubstep world, even if you don't like his music, you have to respect his industry beliefs.

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Computer Love: Beats Music Wants To Be Your Everything

Computer Love: Beats Music Wants To Be Your Everything | Music Industry | Scoop.it
Ann Powers says that for the music lover searching for an immersive streaming service, newcomer Beats Music comes close to offering the complete package.
Rachel Siteman's insight:

The way Beats' brand personality and marketing campaigns are described in this article reminds me of  the "music remains" discussions from Tuesday's class. We discussed how no one sees advertisements for simply music as a whole. Well, watch out world. The method Beats is using to advertise for  its program is basiccaly that advertisement for the music itself. Ann Powers claims that a benefit of using Beats is "the fluid and disembodied nature of streaming [that] reveals that there is no product, no end point or object to music: just playing, listening, loving, remembering, reinterpreting." Beats is about the music itself, and it just happens to be a product that helps listeners access it. 


This idea reminds me of Simon Sinek's book."Start With Why' states that successful people, companies, and organizations all must have a solid foundation in why they are in the business they are in. Formulating a belief in this central idea allows value and purpose to flow outward to how the business can act on that belief and produce a material good. In this case, Beats' "why" is plastered right into their slogan: "A new music service curated by people who believe music is emotion and life." Any true music enthusiast can immediately correlate with this definition for music. To cognitively assemble the theory that this specific belief is driving all that Beats' does leads to a powerful connection for fans and users. Beats is forcing people to feel something that awakens them, enlivens their sense of passion and devotion to music, and might just be on its way to creating a music revolution. 

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