Music Evolution
366 views | +0 today
Follow
Music Evolution
Developments in the way we listen and consume music
Curated by Richard Preedy
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Wow: Wax Revenues Have Grown 455% In Just Five Years... - Digital Music News

Wow: Wax Revenues Have Grown 455% In Just Five Years... - Digital Music News | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Sure, this is still a small piece of overall recording sales in the US, but we keep seeing astonishing growth data. The latest, sourced from RIAA retail revenue data obtained this week, shows a near-fivefold revenue increase in vinyl over a five-year period. Which, when scaled to size, looks something like this...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Exclusive: Apple near cloud-music deals

Exclusive: Apple near cloud-music deals | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Apple already had a deal to offer cloud music from Warner Music and is said to have agreement in place with EMI, music industry sources tell CNET. Sony Music and Universal Music are also close. The negotiations with Sony Music Group and Universal Music Group could be wrapped up as early as next week, the sources said. What this means is that signed contracts with all four of the top four record companies will be in Apple's hip pocket on June 6 when Apple kicks off the company's Worldwide Developers Conference. The sources who spoke with CNET did not know when Apple would announce the deals or roll out the cloud service.

Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-31001_3-20064155-261.html#ixzz1MmsJ8wDM
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Spotify adds MP3 download store, iPod support (Wired UK)

Spotify adds MP3 download store, iPod support (Wired UK) | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
There's a substantial number of people who still rely on MP3s for their music listening, and it's clear that the thrust behind this change is to try and get those people out of iTunes and into Spotify. That's a good thing -- iTunes in its current state is a bloated mess. But the danger is that Spotify could become the same.

By muddying the waters of the original vision for Spotify -- a giant jukebox in the cloud with every song in the world available -- there's a real risk that the product loses its glorious simplicity. You double-click a song, it plays, and the content owner gets paid -- either from subscription or ad revenue.

You can argue that the streaming model doesn't work. Content owners, particularly in the United States, have proved very resistant to the idea of free streaming, despite an enormous amount of enthusiasm for the concept from the general public. The reason is that streaming revenues per stream are low, whereas download revenues per track are high.
more...
Alexa Moran's curator insight, November 10, 2013 9:44 PM

 

In my opinion, Spotify became a lot smarter. They decided that streaming wasn’t really working too well anymore. They decided to combine with ITunes and Media Player. They are also synced to iOS and Android devices. After that they created their own MP3 store, which was super intelligent because they used their resources wisely. They did anything and as much as possible to get noticed which seems to be working. They are one of the many resources that people can use to listen to music.

Suggested by Phil McCann
Scoop.it!

State of independents for record shops - BBC News

State of independents for record shops - BBC News | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Are the so-called little men making a comeback?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

The Insider: No Sell Out / No Sale – Why the audience are not blameless in the free content debate.

The Insider: No Sell Out / No Sale – Why the audience are not blameless in the free content debate. | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Amidst all the talk of a new way of selling music through brands and using advertising to make tracks free, seldom does anyone within the music industry actually ask themselves the question as to whether this is a good thing. Partly this is because the people in labels who have to make the books balance are so battered by trying to square figures that simply don’t add up and so beleaguered by the real and perceived pirating of their product that any golden goose, however unlikely its egg production, is better than none. That said, it seems that, half the time, you lot, the fans, also seem a little confused on how you want the future to be (or not to be).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Music Week - More details of Google music app leak

Music Week - More details of Google music app leak | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
New details about Google's proposed music app for Android devices have been leaked.

The Tech From 10 site is currently hosting the app and running screengrabs, having discovered it by accidently accessing a test version of Android Market as part of a routine handset update.

It says of the app, “It's similar to the Honeycomb music player included on tablets such as the Xoom and also similar to the leak a while back. It's far better than the current music player in Android 2.3.”

It continues, “This music player feels very similar to the Gallery included from Android 2.1, with pop-ups, dynamic backgrounds and similar animations. It also includes the Google Music cloud service, however when we tapped to select our Google Account, no accounts were displayed so we couldn't go further than that.”

This follows details recently emerging of Google conducting internal testing of its proposed cloud-based music service. The company is believed to be in advanced negotiations with labels to secure licences.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Consumers are moving to the cloud…so why are people still buying vinyl records?

Consumers are moving to the cloud…so why are people still buying vinyl records? | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Common opinion generally decrees that, in the future, the majority of consumers will be moving to the cloud to obtain broader access to music. While this is almost certainly true, in the fragmented world of consumer music consumption, a ‘collector’ mentality and desire for personal ownership continue to exist amongst many music fans. The music industry needs to ensure these different needs are addressed, rather than assuming a single model will satisfy all consumers.
more...
Alexa Moran's curator insight, November 10, 2013 8:49 PM

 This article shows the insight of a collector. I thought this article was pretty interesting because I didn’t know that people still bout vinyl records. I like the fact that the article states that it’s “not suggesting for a moment that vinyl is on course to overtake digital sales and/or offer salvation to the music industry.” The article simply just suggests that there are many ways to get music. Collectors prefer buy records because it creates a better listening experience according to the article. It shows that streaming music is not the only way to get music.

Suggested by Phil McCann
Scoop.it!

Amazon Cloud Player steals march on Apple and Google | Technology | guardian.co.uk

Amazon Cloud Player steals march on Apple and Google | Technology | guardian.co.uk | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Amazon has unveiled its ambitious music streaming service, Cloud Player, which allows users to play songs across a number of computers and Android smartphones.

Music lovers will be able to upload most of their existing music library – including tracks bought through Apple's iTunes – to Amazon, as well as buy new songs for digital playback.

The online retailer has stolen a march on rivals Apple and Google with the service, known as Amazon Cloud Player, with both internet giants planning their own forays into music streaming. The move also represents Amazon's repositioning as an entertainment destination, rather than just an online marketplace.

Another element of the service, Amazon Cloud Drive, works like a "digital music locker" where users can upload thousands of songs and listen to them via Cloud Player on any computer or Android smartphone.

"Our customers have told us they don't want to download music to their work computers or phones because they find it hard to move music around to different devices," said the Amazon vice-president of music and movies, Bill Carr. "Now, whether at work, home, or on the go, customers can buy music from Amazon MP3, store it in the cloud and play it anywhere."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

BT has a plan to beat illegal filesharing | Technology | guardian.co.uk

BT has a plan to beat illegal filesharing | Technology | guardian.co.uk | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Josh Halliday: Not-for-profit music download service is a bold move aimed at weaning customers off piracy

BT has kindly agreed to help out its chums in the creative industries with a not-for-profit music download service designed to wean its customers off illegal filesharing.

The move is yet another sign that Ed Vaizey, the communications minister, has been banging heads together at his high-powered meetings between rights holders and internet service providers.

According to a leaked Invitation to Tender document, BT's music download service would be available to its 5.5 million broadband users across the UK. BT says it will unveil the product "in the near future", while talks are thought to be ongoing with major music labels such as Universal Music and EMI.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Did file-sharing cause recording industry collapse? Economists say no Media Policy Project Policy Brief 1: Creative Destruction and Copyright Protection

Did file-sharing cause recording industry collapse? Economists say no Media Policy Project Policy Brief 1: Creative Destruction and Copyright Protection | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
By Bart Cammaerts and Bingchun Meng

Media Policy Project Policy Brief 1: Creative Destruction and Copyright Protection

Two days before the opening of a Judicial Review on the Digital Economy Act (DEA), a new report from the London School of Economics and Political Science casts doubt on the proportionality and likely effectiveness of measures to protect intellectual property, due to be implemented by the DEA. This report, called ‘Creative Destruction and Copyright Protection’ by Bart Cammaerts and Bingchun Meng (London School of Economics), has been commissioned by the LSE Media Policy Project.

The LSE Media Policy Project research finds that:

o The DEA gets the balance between copyright enforcement and innovation wrong. The use of peer-to-peer technology should be encouraged to promote innovative applications. Focusing on efforts to suppress the use of technological advances and to protect out-of-date business models will stifle innovation in this industry.

o Providing user-friendly, hassle-free solutions to enable users to download music legally at a reasonable price, is a much more effective strategy for enforcing copyright than a heavy-handed legislative and regulatory regime.

o Decline in the sales of physical copies of recorded music cannot be attributed solely to file-sharing, but should be explained by a combination of factors such as changing patterns in music consumption, decreasing disposable household incomes for leisure products and increasing sales of digital content through online platforms.

According to report author, Bart Cammaerts,

“The music industry and artists should innovate and actively reconnect with their sharing fans rather than treat them as criminals. They should acknowledge that there are also other reasons for its relative decline beyond the sharing of copyright protected content, not least the rising costs of live performances and other leisure services to the detriment of leisure goods. Alternative sources of income generation for artists should be considered instead of actively monitoring the online behaviour of UK citizens.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

10 years of the iPod | Technology | The Guardian

10 years of the iPod | Technology | The Guardian | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
It's 10 years since Apple's original iPod shuffled on to the scene, changing the way we listen to and buy music for good. But could it soon be time to hang up our white headphones?

"The iPod's essentially finished, give or take," says Dr Alice Enders, a former senior economist at the World Trade Organisation who now reports on global music markets for media consultancy Enders Analysis. "Sales have been in decline for some time. The converged media device is the way forward." In other words: the iPhone, the iPod Touch and the iPad – devices that the iPod paved the way for, devices that have helped push Apple's latest profits to a record-breaking $20bn. If the iPod now finds itself as the least-loved of the company's shiny portable devices, you get the sense Apple is probably OK with that.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

From dabblers to fanatics: the UK’s digital diversity revealed in report

From dabblers to fanatics: the UK’s digital diversity revealed in report | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
The industry's skill at helping potential digital companies tailor their online services to the UK’s music buyers has been strengthened after new research identified a vast range of consumer behaviour.

The 46-page Into The Future report, commissioned by the major labels and UK Music, may also help the industry in targeting its Digital Economy Act notifications to filesharers, after uncovering eight key groupings, from music obsessives to those who rarely shell out on music or only buy CDs.

The study, compiled by the Future Business Research Group – a coalition of senior executives from majors and music organisations’ res-earch facilities – underlines what digital experts have been saying for years: not all music buyers are the same and there is no one-size-fits-all service.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Game Changing Study Puts Piracy in Perspective | TorrentFreak

Game Changing Study Puts Piracy in Perspective | TorrentFreak | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Game Changing Study Puts Piracy in Perspective.
To counter the many one-sided piracy studies that have been released by the entertainment industry in recent history, a group of dozens of academics have bundled their powers to write the most objective and elaborate piracy study to date. As many would have predicted, the results differ quite significantly from the message pro-copyright lobby groups have put out over the years.

The majority of the reports on piracy have one thing in common – they are funded by the entertainment industries to provide ammunition for political lobbying efforts. The downside of these reports, aside from the biased outcome, is that they tend to focus on just one area – the alleged losses for the industry caused by piracy.

Instead of focusing on the consequences, however, it might be much more constructive to also look at the causes of piracy. After all, the solution to a problem can often be found by looking at its origins.

To fill this gap, a coalition of academic researchers under the flag of the Social Science Research Counsel (SSRC) took up the task of providing a more neutral and deeper overview of what drives piracy. For several years they looked at the current piracy landscape, the past efforts of the entertainment industries to curb it, and with a strong focus on emerging economies.

This week the final report was released. This article highlights some of the key findings and is an interesting read.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Apple vs. Google vs. Amazon: Comparing The Cloud Music Services

Apple vs. Google vs. Amazon: Comparing The Cloud Music Services | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) finally revealed the details of its hotly anticipated, Steve Jobs keynote-worthy iCloud, including a major iTunes upgrade, at the kickoff for this week’s WWDC. That upgrade includes iTunes Match, a cloud-based music service competing with Google’s Music Beta and Amazon’s Cloud Drive. In our chart below, we’ve compared the major differences among the three services, including their unique features, and their pluses and minuses. Plus, take our poll: Which cloud-based music service are you most likely to use?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

CD and mobile music sales fall in 2010, but vinyl continues its resurgence

CD and mobile music sales fall in 2010, but vinyl continues its resurgence | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
U.S. music sales shrank to $6.9 billion, down 11% from 2009 and roughly half of what it was a decade ago, according to figures released by the RIAA.

Vinyl is back.

While sales of compact discs and ringtones suffered double-digit declines last year, vinyl records enjoyed what appears to be an enduring resurgence in 2010, according to figures released Thursday by the Recording Industry Assn. of America.

CD sales dropped 21% in 2010 to $3.36 billion, down from $4.27 billion in 2009, said RIAA, whose members include the industry's largest record labels. Vinyl LP sales, meanwhile, surged 26%, albeit to a modest $4 million, up from $3.2 million in 2009. The increase comes partly from live DJs who prefer vinyl over digital and partly from a new generation of collectors who see them as valuable souvenirs.
more...
Alexa Moran's curator insight, November 10, 2013 9:16 PM

 

After reading this article, I was shocked because I didn’t think that vinyl records were bought more than CDs. It states that buying an individual song grew in downloads by 2.1% in 2010 with more than 1.16 billion tracks sold, compared with 1.14 billion in 2009. The fact that digital music grew 10% because of apple was interesting. It shows that music is has evolved a lot through the years and it also shows that music never dies.

Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Music Week - 20% album boost for Record Store Day 2011

Music Week - 20% album boost for Record Store Day 2011 | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Data from the Official Charts Company (OCC) has revealed sales of physical albums rose by 20% on Saturday as people flocked to their local record shops for Record Store Day 2011.

Sales of physical singles meanwhile were more than double last year’s total – with RSD exclusive releases accounting for nine out of the Top 10 vinyl albums and eight out of the Top 10 physical singles of the week.

Around180 stores took part in RSD 2011 - 30 more than last year – and some reported sale increases up around 70% on last year’s event.

There were around 250 exclusive releases available in participating stores, more than double last year’s tally, and more than 200 artists and bands played in record stores around the country.

Record Store Day coordinator and Rough Trade East manager Spencer Hickman said the day was now one of the most significant music events of the year and added, “The response this year has just been phenomenal. We opened at 9am and closed at 8pm and in that time had between 800-900 people queuing outside the shop. The day seems to have struck a chord with artists, labels and music fans alike.”
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Phil McCann
Scoop.it!

Spotify to halve free music allowance guardian.co.uk

Spotify to halve free music allowance guardian.co.uk | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Music streaming service limits non-subscribers to five plays for an individual track, and 10 hours free.
more...
Alexa Moran's curator insight, November 10, 2013 10:13 PM


After reading this article I had mixed emotions about what I read because as person that loves to listen to free music this is a disadvantage. I would like to have more time to listen to the music that’s provided by them. On the other hand, I understand why Spotify reduced the amount of time we can listen to the music that is given by them. Even though I think that they made the wrong decision because their competition offered more and they started to lost active users.

Suggested by Phil McCann
Scoop.it!

HMV to expand into music technology hardware -

HMV to expand into music technology hardware - | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
HMV to expand into music technology hardware - Latest For years HMV was one of the leading music retailers on the British high street, however changes in the ways that people now buy and listen to music have seen the company slump recently.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Music Week - US digital sales to eclipse physical in 2012

Music Week - US digital sales to eclipse physical in 2012 | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Record label revenues from digital sales will eclipse those from physical sales next year according to a new forecast.

The Global Recorded Music Market Forecast report from Strategy Analytics claims consumer spending on CDs will drop from $3.8bn (£2.35bn) in 2010 to $2.7bn (£1.67bn) in 2012.

Against this, it projects digital revenues will grow to $2.8bn (£1.73bn) next year.

The digital business will be dominated by single-track sales until 2015 according to the report. It forecasts individual track sales will account for 29% of the market then while digital albums will make up 32%. Alongside this, subscription-based services will hold 14% of the market.

Strategy Analytics director of digital media research Martin Olausson said, “Digital music is not developing as fast as expected. While online revenues will expand further over the coming years, the overall size of the recorded music industry will continue to contract as record companies struggle to identify growth strategies."

Senior analyst Jia Wu added, “Music companies must look beyond download-to-own for digital revenue growth. With rapid adoption of connected devices and ubiquitous broadband, music fans will expect greater flexibility and wider consumption choices.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Music Week - Radioplayer launches in the UK

Music Week - Radioplayer launches in the UK | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
An online listening platform, billed as “the most important development in the last 50 years of radio”, launched today.

The platform, developed by not-for-profit company UK Radioplayer, whose founding partners are the BBC, Global Radio, GMG Radio, Absolute Radio and the RadioCentre, is a cross-industry move to bring online radio together in one place and boost listening via the internet.

Radioplayer, accessed either via radioplayer.co.uk or participating stations’ own websites, allows listeners to tune in online using pop out players that individual stations can personalise, adding - for example - adverts, now playing information and links to podcasts.

Within each individual player, however, there is a search engine that allows the user to search for stations and other online content such as podcasts. The intention is that users can flick between stations seamlessly, storing their favourites as pre-sets.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Digital Economy Act: further delay to illegal downloading measures | Technology | guardian.co.uk

Digital Economy Act: further delay to illegal downloading measures | Technology | guardian.co.uk | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Plans to send warning letters to alleged illegal downloaders pushed back until next year amid high court review. By Josh Halliday.

Let's hope it stays that way...this is not the solution to the music industry's problems.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Global recorded music sales fall almost $1.5bn amid increased piracy | Business | guardian.co.uk

Global recorded music sales fall almost $1.5bn amid increased piracy | Business | guardian.co.uk | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
UK loses mantle as third largest music market after 'physical' sales of CDs collapse by almost a fifth.

Global recorded music sales fell by almost $1.5bn last year as digital piracy continued to take its toll on the industry, with the UK losing its mantle as the third largest music market after "physical" sales of CDs collapsed by almost a fifth.

Global recorded music revenues fell 8.4% last year, about $1.45bn (£905m), to $15.9bn according to the annual Recording Industry in Numbers report by international music industry body the IFPI.

Overall physical sales, the term used in the industry for sales of products such as CDs, fell by 14.2% year-on-year to $10.4bn.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

» A SPARC of inspiration? Deciphering the future of music online » TNW Media

» A SPARC of inspiration? Deciphering the future of music online » TNW Media | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
In his recent presentation at the MIDEM music industry conference, Mark Mulligan, a music analyst at Forrester Research, recently introduced his view on the problems facing the music industry in the digital age.

Mulligan, having mapped out a fairly frightening set of realities, concluded by introducing SPARC – essentially an acronym that contains some guidelines for the music products of the future that has subsequently been doing the rounds in the world of Digital Media this past few weeks.

This article tries to decipher SPARC for anyone who might be wondering what he’s getting at...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Preedy
Scoop.it!

Take a good album apart? Don't be ridiculous - Telegraph

Take a good album apart? Don't be ridiculous - Telegraph | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
Our listening experience is dictated by technology, which is bad news for the album.
Since the Beatles signed up with iTunes, you can download individual tracks from their albums. You may start to question the band’s reputation for creative genius, however, should you download the Abbey Road classic, She Came In Through The Bathroom Window. It starts mid-beat with the guitar outro from Polythene Pam and ends with clumsy abruptness before the sublime segue into Golden Slumbers.
It sounds horrible and ridiculous, because it has been artificially extracted from side two’s (now there’s a quaint notion) seamless medley that weaves together ten songs, building with operatic grandeur to the band’s gorgeous, emotional farewell to their public, The End (also available to download as a 2 minute 20 snippet). The medley really needs to be heard in full, in order, just as its creators intended. Out of context, the climax is robbed of all emotional impact. But this is just an extreme example of how we listen to most music these days, as individual tracks selected by computer algorithm. In the process we turn classic albums into a random jumble of arbitrary fragments.
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Olly Robinson
Scoop.it!

Cloud-based Music Streaming Will Be Dominant by 2016 (Study) | Billboard.biz

Cloud-based Music Streaming Will Be Dominant by 2016 (Study) | Billboard.biz | Music Evolution | Scoop.it
By 2016, cloud-based streaming services will become a more important form of access to music than owning albums, songs or tracks, forecasts ABI Research.

"The number of subscribers to mobile music streaming services is expected to approach 5.9 million by the end of this year," analyst Aapo Markkanen said. "ABI Research believes that number will exceed 161 million subscribers in 2016, meaning a compound annual growth rate of nearly 95%."

ABI Research attributes this shift primarily to the growing use of mobile handsets, especially smart phones, as listening devices.

The study suggests that the service providers that enable these new models, such as Rhapsody, Melon and Spotify, will be among the biggest winners from these developments.

"Record labels, producers and other middlemen whose businesses have been shaken by content piracy also stand to gain from streaming services as they have an opportunity to monetize a lot of consumption that would otherwise take place outside their revenue base," ABI Research predicts.
more...
Alexa Moran's curator insight, November 10, 2013 7:49 PM

This article shows how the advanced the world has become. It states that by 2016, music is going to be accessible mostly through streaming through the Internet. We are in 2013 and in my opinion that’s already happening. People have gotten accustomed through the different types of technologies. Streaming music has become a habit because of all the technology we have. Buying records or CDs rarely happens because there are so many different ways to buy or get things from the Internet.

 

Pros: The advantage of streaming music from the Internet is that it becomes a lot easier to do. Streaming also allows you to check out new artists to see if you like them before decide to download their songs. It makes the process a lot faster.

 

Cons: The disadvantage of streaming music from the Internet in my opinion is mostly for the artists because most streaming is done illegally. This means people can get the artist’s song for free. People can also take the artist’s music and make it look like it’s their own. The artist’s basically lose all their rights which is unfair.