Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom
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Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom
A compilation of resources for incorporating and developing the use of medias as primary and supplementary texts.
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Twitter as textual dialogue

Twitter as textual dialogue | Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom | Scoop.it

Twitter is a resource that many teachers have started using in getting students to take their learning beyond the classroom.  What many may not realize is that tweets, just like text messages, are a form of writing, and therefore a form a text.  When students engage in retweeting and tweeting at others and replying to tweets, they are engaging in a type of dialogue as they read and write digital texts.  Not only is this a great project for students, but tweets as supplemental texts in the classroom can take learning to a much more current and relevant playing field.  It also makes reading seem less daunting with the character limits, and it allows students to see new ideas and perspectives.

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Pinterest in curating digital images

Pinterest in curating digital images | Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom | Scoop.it

Pinterest is an online pinboard that is, in essence, a way to curate images and resources.  I think this could be a great tool for students to curate types of digital and multimedia text, especially in the English classroom.  Students can create boards for books they're reading or certain themes from their reading, and pin images that illustrate the literature or themes.  It's a great way to get them thinking visually about the content, and searching for ways that might be represented.  It's also a good tool for students in organizing content, and making their learning public and shared in the world of Pinterest as others repin them and they repin others.

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Using Music and Songs

This resource discusses ways of incorporating music and songs within and English/Language Arts classroom.  Songs are a lot like poems, and students can analyze the pieces of songs that help contribute to the message.  Unlike evaluating the formatting and diction of print text and poetry, listening to songs can provide students other means of evaluation, like tone, tempo, genre, and other musical elements like crescendos and staccato - anything that could portray the topic in a certain light.  This brings analyzing poetry to a whole new dimension when it's based off how music interacts with text.  Teachers can also incorporate music in lessons that expose students to the culture of a certain book or time period, like jazz with The Great Gatsby, or protest songs with The Things They Carried.

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Using Electronic Texts in the Classroom

This article talks about the benefits of using "e-texts" over print texts.  Electronic texts, or "e-texts" are outlined in the article as online collections of historical documents, scripts, poems, short stories, and novels available from online providers. For schools that are under-resourced or under-funded and don't have the means of providing English classrooms with enough books for students, this is a great tool.  Students can read online, or if your students don't have access to computers and the internet, teachers can print them out.  Not only is the reading more attainable since it is online, but it provides supplementary resources to go along with the text.

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Teacher Guide - Using Photographs

This source provides a number of questions and potential activites that teachers can use to incorporate photographs into their lessons.  Other than identifying the components of the image, students can interpret the reason for the photograph and the message it conveys.  Students can also look at sensory details of the image, and teachers can use images to visually convey symbolism and themes from a primary text.

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Teaching Multi-Media Texts

This article outlines different kinds of multimedia texts that educators can use in the classroom, and evaluates the effectiveness and potential uses for each one.  It includes ideas like blogging, radio, digital storytelling, documentaries, and hypertext among others.  It argues for a need to reconceptualize the boundaries that we draw around different textual forms, which is my purpose in this curation, and the way in which we categorize various language codes and conventions.

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Using Documentaries In The Classroom

Like all media, documentary producers have a point-of-view and it is up to the audience (students) to be able to decipher it, deconstruct it and understand all of the techniques used which make documentaries believable.  Using documentaries in instruction can get students thinking critically about media literacy and the language of film.  It can also provide them the necessary background information for the context of other texts, and documentaries can act as texts in themselves because they are narrative accounts and explanations regarding people, a time period, a location, or a concept.  They also often incorporate interviews, and students can analyze the effectiveness of personal accounts and the credibility of the documentary's focus or representation of its subject.

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Google Lit Trips

Google Lit Trips | Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom | Scoop.it

Google Lit Trips are free downloadable files that mark the journeys of characters from famous literature on the surface of Google Earth. At each location along the journey there are placemarks with pop-up windows containing a variety of resources including relevant media, thought provoking discussion starters, and links to supplementary information about “real world” references made in that particular portion of the story.  This tool is a great way to engage students with relevant literary experiences as they encounter characters on a more authentic and real-world level.

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Hypermedia

Hypermedia refers to hyperlinked multimedia—the linkage of text, audio, graphics, animation, and/or video through hyperlinks. For example, a hypermedia study guide might offer illustrated textbook content hyperlinked to web-based video and other content, glossary entries, and comprehension questions. Digital texts can be enriched with a range of instructional supports such as vocabulary definitions, translations, explanatory notes, background information, and instructional prompts, and then each of these supports can take the form of varied media. For example, vocabulary definitions might be presented as text, pictures, and/or animated graphics. Background information might be presented as a map, video, annotated bibliography with text and audio, or illustrated timeline.

 

Hypermedia is a great tool to support differences in students' ability to access specific media forms and differences in their literacy and media literacy skills.  It's also a great way to engage learners with added material.

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Film Education: Using Film in the English Classroom

Film Education: Using Film in the English Classroom | Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom | Scoop.it

An introduction for English teachers who want to use film within their teaching...

 

This article discusses how films contain their own syntax via camera movement, camera position, framing, lighting, sound, and editing as some of the main vocabulary by which a director or screenwriter may express a narrative.  Film adaptations of literary works can be explored in the classroom as interpretations, with the idea that both the visual and written text will enhance students' understanding of both.  This can be highly effective and engaging as students learn how to read texts actively and interpret visual representations.  It argues that it is completely valid to use film in an English classroom as a medium in its own right.  An understanding of film on the level of sequence, scene and whole text, and a grasp of the grammar of the moving image as well as an appropriate critical vocabulary, is now recognized as an important part of literacy in its broader sense.

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Podcasting In and Out of the Classroom

Podcasting In and Out of the Classroom | Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom | Scoop.it

Podcasting is useful in numerous ways for a Language Arts classroom.  It can be used for recording a teacher’s lesson or a student conversation. It can be used to create a homework assignment or even be part of a test. Podcasts are created on books all the time - students could listen to portions of their reading or hear chunks of critical analyses and reviews.  Students can use podcasts to interview each other about what they learned during the week.  Students could read their own essays or stories, or utilize podcasts for slam poetry. Podcasts can also be used to record presentations and make them available online.  All of these examples and others are included on this website that outlines how to use podcasts, the resources available to use in creating podcasts, and tutorials to help guide students and teachers through the process.  It also provides tools that build off of podcasts, such as creating voicethreads and becoming familiar with how to use RSS in aggregating podcast feeds. 

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How To Make Students Better Online Researchers | Edudemic

How To Make Students Better Online Researchers | Edudemic | Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom | Scoop.it

With the switch from print encyclopedias, anthologies, and public records to internet-based resources, research requires new skills that involve evaluating the validity of material,  According to this article, students still struggle a great deal in being able to find credible, useful, and relevant resources online.  Teachers can help to improve their students' online researching abilities by teaching them critical thinking and language skills in narrowing down their search terms and specifying what they're looking for.  They can also teach them how to evaluate and analyze the search results in identifying what is scholarly and useful.  Knowing how to find resources online is crucial for any academic subject-area, but being competent in digital literacy is necessary in discerning what information is appropriate and valid.

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Recorded Speech

Recorded speech and speeches are a great way of incorporating authentic communication within the English classroom.  Recordings allow students to observe the real act of communication, complete with the interactional features that just a scripted dialogue or transcript would exclude.  It also gives students a true picture of real spontanious speech with its hesitations, false starts, and "mistakes" and the article mentioned.  Speeches are written for oral purposes, so not including the audio component in studying them neglects all of the emotionally-charged and linguistic manupulation of its presentation.

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Learning Vocabulary Through Music

Not only do students learn vocabulary from what they read, but they can learn it from what they hear as well.  This slideshare presentation discusses how students can learn vocabulary from analyzing songs.  Students can answer questions like how does music help me learn, understand, and remember?  How does the language of music effect us? and how does rhythm and rhyme help me remember information?  Not only is music a type of text that students can analyze, but it's a type of strategy that can aid in teaching other things like vocabulary and the affects of language.

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jaylene schuller's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:30 PM

helping people... in comes music

 

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Timelines in the Classroom

Timelines in the Classroom | Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom | Scoop.it

This website contains resources for both teachers and students to use in creating timelines or looking at timelines.  In an English classroom, this is especially helpful in looking at text that have a great deal of plot activity and exposition, or in looking at an author's life in perspective.  You can also create them to teach the chronology or organization of writing papers, showing students what to start and end with, and all of the required pieces along the way.  Students can create the timelines too on certain topics or characters from their text.  Timelines operate as texts themselves too, though, and students can analyze the progression of events in determining cause and effect.

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Students as Creators: Exploring Multimedia

Students as Creators: Exploring Multimedia | Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom | Scoop.it

Students are introduced to the genre of multimedia presentations through a review and analysis of online presentations. They then apply what they have learned to create their own multimedia presentations.

This is a ReadWriteThink lesson plan that has students develop multimedia presentations as a genre of its own.  First, it has students view and analyze sample multimedia presentations and develop a list of characteristics of the genre. Students then brainstorm programs and tools they could use to make their own multimedia presentations and review copyright law. Finally, they plan, storyboard, and create their own multimedia presentations. The lesson stresses the importance of using media in compliance with copyright protection and provides information about various multimedia formats.  

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Multimedia Applications for the Classroom

Multimedia, as the article defines it, is in essence a presentation of information that incorporates multiple media such as text, audio, graphics, and animation. While students are accustomed to having a range of means to communicate and process information outside of school, they must conform to a more restrictive media environment within school. Printed text is one-size-fits-all, but students' learning strengths, needs, and interests are all over the map. Thus, the traditional print-driven curriculum raises a number of barriers to access and learning.  Integration of multimedia into instruction can help to reduce curriculum barriers and improve learning for all students.

 

The article discusses the uses and potential activites involved with several examples, including talking books and speech synthesis, film, hypermedia, and computer simulations.

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Education World: Why Teach Current Events?

Education World: Why Teach Current Events? | Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom | Scoop.it

Including current events in the classroom is a great way to incorporate real world content as text in an English classroom.  Students can analyze how newswriting differs from other types of writing, engaging them in an authentic critique of writing for various purposes and audiences.  They can also assess the articles for bias, credibility of information, and compare it to other perspectives.

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Radios in the Classroom: Curriculum Integration and Communication Skills

Radios in the Classroom: Curriculum Integration and Communication Skills | Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom | Scoop.it

English and language arts teachers can use radios to reinforce listening, writing, and speaking skills.  Students can also learn about communications technology and the art of audio advertisement.  Using radio in the classroom can also facilitate the integration of social studies curriculum, as broadcasts often represent other geographic locations.  In addition, students can evaluate radio debates in learning about argumentative writing, and assess the effectiveness of verbal vs. textual arguments.

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Digital Maps

This source provides access to countless websites such as MapQuest, EarthCam, and Maps of the World that you can use in the classroom to engage students with the geography, context, and setting associated with the content.  These types of maps are much more effective than your average roadmap because they provide 360 degree angles of satellite, real-time images that can give students an authentic sense of a location.  This can also bridge interdisciplinary studies of English and History/Social Studies in looking at other places and cultures as they are associated or referenced in a text.

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Digital Storytelling

Digital Storytelling is essentially a compilation of images combined with a narrative soundtrack to tell a story.  What separates this from film is that the images are still - there is no moving picture.  Used in an English/Language Arts classroom, students focus on the writing and the communication process in devising their script and what images to convey for their story. 

Digital storytelling can be used to engage struggling readers and writers who have not yet experienced the power of personal expression.  It also gives students authenticity to their writing, whereas Powerpoints and other presentation types are much more 3rd person and objective, and it can teach point of view and pathos. 

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Digital Images in the Language Arts Classroom

Digital images provide ways for student readers and writers to engage with both visual and print texts.  This article outlines four different ways and reasons to use digital images: 1. Digital images can help readers envision text.  Good readers often visualize the action of a story, creating a mental movie of images evoked by the story. Struggling readers often lack this skill.  The article addressed this by talking about the development of a visual think aloud, challenging students to reinvent a classroom reading strategy using video editing tools to develop sequences of images organized along digital time lines.  This makes the reading process visible  2. Digital images offer a unique bridge to writing.  The article states that just as digital images provide an entry point for readers, they can also provide an entry point for beginning writers as they also create their own texts—narrative, persuasive, and expository.  3. Digital images allow students to visually communicate meaning.  Ultimately, English class is more than the text - it's about communication too.

 

Apart from these main points, the article provides examples of ways in which digital storytelling can be used in the English classroom, and gives an overview of how students can choose what to say, how to acquire images, how to storyboard, and how to revise.  As the article states, "Effective teaching practices paired with powerful technologies provide student readers and writers with unique experiences to transform their understading of events, printed texts, words, and images.  Literacy demands that students communicate and make meaning from a variety of texts, but also that they use that literacy in terms of how they live their lives.  Images allow students to see what they think they know, connect the new to the known, and express their understanding in ways that are visual, auditory, scholarly, and powerful."

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Films as Primary & Supplementary Texts

Films as Primary & Supplementary Texts | Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom | Scoop.it

This resource provides links and lesson plans to incorporating films into the Language Arts classroom for teaching common literary texts and themes.  The webpage containts categories of films that include: adaptations of British literature, adaptations of US literature, adaptations of world literature, films from which literary devices may be taught, films from which character stages and archetypes may be taught, and nonfiction films, among others.  It also provides rationales for using film that consists of combatting the need for student engagement with literature, and providing visual representations for unfamiliar material (especially with world literature) to aid in students' own interpretations.

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Compare-Contrast, Cause-Effect, Problem-Solution: Common 'Text Types' in The Times

Compare-Contrast, Cause-Effect, Problem-Solution: Common 'Text Types' in The Times | Multimedia as Texts in the Language Arts Classroom | Scoop.it

Suggestions for helping students understand common expository "text structures" like cause and effect, compare and contrast and problem-solution that appear often in The Times.

 

The Times contains topic pages that collect all the news, reference and archival information, photos, graphics, audio and video files published on most any category or subject area.  It can be a great resource for students to utilize when researching background information on what they're reading, or finding supplemental texts and sources that align with the setting, symbols, or themes from the primary text.  Teachers can also use The Times in order to explicitly teach text structure in print sources, and to provide their students with supplemental pieces of non-print sources (podcasts, interactive graphics, videos, pictures, etc).

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