Mrs. Watson's Class
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'They're Scared': Immigration Fears Exacerbate Migrant Farmworker Shortage

'They're Scared': Immigration Fears Exacerbate Migrant Farmworker Shortage | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Some growers say that President Trump's anti-immigrant rhetoric has made a chronic worker shortage even worse.
Nancy Watson's insight:
Unit 2 Migration & Unit 5 Agriculture. Perspective on immigration laws and quotas. 
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This Map Shows The Literal Meaning Of Every State Name

This Map Shows The Literal Meaning Of Every State Name | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Flattened Water. Place of the Small Spring. Milky Water. At first glance, these phrases might look like just a jumble of words, but they’re actually something way cooler: the literal translation of three state names in the United States. Can you guess which ones? Expedia Canada put together this colorful map
Nancy Watson's insight:
Unit 3. Language and toponyms
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Where We Came From and Where We Went, State by State

Where We Came From and Where We Went, State by State | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Updated charts now show two views: where people who live in each state were born, and where people who were born in a state moved to.
Nancy Watson's insight:
Interesting for Unit 2 migration
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Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 2017 10:14 AM
Unit 2 - Interregional and Intraregional Migration
josiewern's curator insight, December 8, 2017 5:46 AM

Unit 2 article 2              overall article 3

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All the World’s Immigration Visualized in 1 Map

All the World’s Immigration Visualized in 1 Map | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
This map shows the estimated net immigration (inflows minus outflows) by origin and destination country between 2010 and 2015. Blue circles = positive net migration (more inflows). Red circles = negative net migration (more outflows). Each yellow dot represents 1,000 people. Hover over a circle to see that country’s total net migration between 2010 and 2015. […]
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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 10, 2016 11:27 PM
Read and scroll all the way down for all the information and maps! Pay attention to the blue circles which represent more inflow of migration and red circles which represent more outflows.  Hover over the circles for more information!
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Mapping Migration in the United States

Mapping Migration in the United States | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
An interactive map showing nationwide migration patterns in the United States since 1900.
Nancy Watson's insight:

You can see the influence of immigration both intra and international on states and where states tend to keep their own at home

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Video: Ukrainian Refugees, Lost and in Limbo

Video: Ukrainian Refugees, Lost and in Limbo | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Over a million people have been forced to flee their homes because of the war in Ukraine. Many of these internally displaced people have struggled to find a new life.
Nancy Watson's insight:

migration, political units. Ukrainian conflict and its personal consequences. 

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Against the Wall - Promo

Against the Wall - Promo | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Post 9/11 there are more walls and political barriers than ever. But do they work?
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Gives an insight into the pros and cons of building walls and how they can change the perceptions  on each side

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U.S. Hispanic and Asian populations growing, but for different reasons

U.S. Hispanic and Asian populations growing, but for different reasons | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Both Hispanics and Asians been among the fastest-growing racial/ethnic groups in recent years, but since 2010, number of Asians have increased at a faster rate.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 27, 2014 10:15 AM

It is often noted that the cultural composition of the United States is undergoing a shift, referred to by some as the "Browning of America."  The story of Asian and Hispanic growth in the United States are occurring simultaneously, which makes many assume that they are growing for the same reasons.  The data clearly shows that this is not the case.  


Tags: migration, USA, ethnicity.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:55 PM

APHG-U2

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 2014 9:46 PM

A very interesting fact, because I thought that Hispanic race had grown rather than Asian race in the last few years but I see that not. Another thing that caught my attention was that the Hispanic  population has  growth due to the Hispanic  birth here in U.S and not because they immigrate to U.S. But in the case of the growth of the Asian population, is because they immigrate. I didn't know that, now I am more  informed.

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High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Interesting look at who goes and who stays in selected cities. 

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Mapping 60 Years of White Flight, Brain Drain and American Migration

Mapping 60 Years of White Flight, Brain Drain and American Migration | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
An interactive picture of Americans perpetually on the move.
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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."


Via Seth Dixon
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Aleena Reyes's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:21 PM

Even though this article is now three years old, it is refreshing to see that Mexico is really making their mark on the global market. The Global North seems to be coming to a stalemate while "up and coming countries" like Mexico are becoming the perfect place for people to begin their businesses and have a fresh start on life. I can understand though, how it was mentioned on the third page of the article, that some locals may feel that foreigners, European especially, may be receiving some type of special treatment due to past colonialism. However, these entrepreneurs are shaping the economy of Mexico. This is Mexico's chance to advance in the world and increase its GDP. Young, aspiring moguls all seems to feel the same way about their homelands, "Europe, dying; Mexico, coming to life. The United States, closed and materialistic; Mexico, open and creative" and Diego Quemada-Diez, a Spanish director, was quoted in the article, "Europe feels spiritually dead and so does the United States...[y]ou end up wanting something else".  And apparently, Mexico has that "something else".

 

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 21, 2015 10:25 AM

Again, I would be interested in seeing how these statistics would change if they were to factor in illegal immigration from Mexico into the United States, but the data remains promising. Mexico has the potential to be an economic powerhouse, and hopefully will utilize this potential sooner rather than later. Although rampant corruption remains in the nation's politics and reinforcement agencies, a strong Mexican economy will ultimately deescalate the violence by stripping the cartels of their strongest allure- well-paying employment for uneducated young men. A stronger Mexican economy will also undoubtedly help the US in terms of trade, as well as reducing the rate of cartel-related violence in the southern regions of the nation. With so many Americans today rallying around Trump's racially-charged rants on Mexican immigration, it brings a smile to my face that we are currently sending more Americans to take Mexican jobs than they are sending our way. The hypocrisy of these politicians and their policies are laughable. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:20 AM

I’ve posted earlier about the end of cheap China; the rising cost of doing business in China coupled with the higher transportation costs to get goods to North American and European markets have made manufacturing in Mexican much more competitive on the global market.  Many investors are turning to Mexico as an emerging land of opportunity and Mexico is now a destination for migrants.  This is still a new pattern:  only 1 percent of the country is foreign-born compared to the 13 percent that you would see in the United States.  Mexican migration to the United States has stabilized; about as many Mexicans have moved to the U.S. (2005-2010) as those that have moved south of the border.


Tags: Mexico, industry, location, place, migration.

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The Health Toll of Immigration

The Health Toll of Immigration | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A growing body of mortality research on immigrants has shown that the longer they live in the United States, the worse their rates of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 7, 2013 10:55 PM

This article highlights a fascinating cultural shift that impacts the migrants that come to the United States.  The second generation might have more money but they tend to live shorter lives than their parents.  As the next generation becomes integrated into American pop culture, unhealthy habits follow (smoking, drinking, high-calorie diets and sedentary lifestyles). 


Tags: migrationpopular culture, population, food, culture.

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The changing origins of U.S. immigrants

The changing origins of U.S. immigrants | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Back in 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they tend to come from Asia and Africa.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:17 PM

From these statistics i dont think the biggest change is the latin american immigrant population but the european population. The european went from 13% to 8 % of the total make up of immigrant population. Thats a 60% decline, and that tells me that the attraction of living in America has diwendled while the EU market is on the rise. I think this is from the growing economies of the EU market and also the fact that the US has been improving in many of the leading statistics such as education, child care, and quality of life. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:58 AM

Is not a surprise that illegal immigrants have been decreasing since 2007, because the economy crisis and the borders.   

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:34 PM

Immigration has been an ongoing issue and the problem of border hopping doesn't make it any better. Of course numbers are going to vary from year to year. This article discusses where US immigrants come from and how the immigration changes over time. In 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they mostly come from Asia and Africa. Also, these statistics are only based off of legal immigrations. We cant forget the ones that just hop the border in their free time. As stated in the article, it has been estimated that there are about 11.1 million illegal immigrants in the United States. A majority of them come from Latin America and the Caribbean. With that being said, legal immigrants still make up the biggest chunk of the foreign population in the United States and the population only continues to grow.

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Older millennials are leaving the city for a new kind of suburb

Older millennials are leaving the city for a new kind of suburb | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Older millennials are ditching the city for a new kind of suburb that offers the convenience of high-quality grocery stores and boutique fitness centers without the hustle and bustle of urban life.
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'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before

'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Shrinking GDP and a falling population are poised to turn Japan into what economists call a "demographic time bomb," and other countries could be next.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:
Population unit 
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 20, 2017 10:34 PM

Preliminary HSc - Global challenges: Population

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:01 PM

The article headline is quite click-baity, but there is some real substance to this article.  The graphs are especially useful to teach concepts such as population momentum and the age-dependency ratio. These were the key parts of the article that caught my eye:

  • An aging population will mean higher costs for the government, a shortage of pension and social security-type funds, a shortage of people to care for the very aged, slow economic growth, and a shortage of young workers.
  • Following feminism's slow build in Japan since the 1970s, today's workers strive for equality between the sexes, something Japan's pyramid-style corporate structure just isn't built for. That's because institutional knowledge is viewed as a big deal in Japan.
  • The elderly now make up 27% of Japan's population. In the US, the rate is only 15%. Experts predict the ratio in Japan could rise to 40% by 2050. With that comes rising social-security costs, which the shrinking younger generations are expected to bear.
  • To make up for an aging population and aversion toward immigrant work, Japan's tech sector has stepped up its efforts in robotics and artificial intelligence.

Tags: culture, genderlabor, populationmigration, JapanEast Asia.

josiewern's curator insight, December 8, 2017 4:33 AM

unit 2 article 1              2

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An economic impact of migration you might not have considered

An economic impact of migration you might not have considered | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A look at the effect of migration on foreign direct investment.
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Internal Migration in Mexico

Internal Migration in Mexico | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Mexico’s cities are ballooning in population while rural and indigenous communities, where there are still over 60 indigenous languages other than Spanish spoken, are disappearing. For many indigenous families, illiteracy and the powerful forces of racism and discrimination can often offset the lures that brought them to migrate to urban centers.

 

The northern border with the United States is not the only destination for Mexican migrants. For millions, the bustling cities, which offer hopes of better jobs and education lure many from their traditional rural, and often indigenous communities. What they find in the cities is a mix of hope and hardship.


Tags: Mexico, indigenous, economic, development, migration.


Via Seth Dixon
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Landon Conner's curator insight, November 3, 2015 8:51 PM

Many of these Mexicans go through tough times moving from place to place and job to job. Many that lived in rural areas are now in more civilized metro areas with more people and technology. I great deal of Mexicans move and are adapting to these new environments with cause problems and hardships in the process. LDC

London Kassab's curator insight, November 3, 2015 9:35 PM

Mexico is having a lot of internal migration within cities. Many different languages are disappearing and for a lot of the people literacy, racism, and other forces can often bring them to urban areas. Also the border isn't the only hope for migrants, bustling cities offer hopes of better lifestyle as well.    L.K.

Clayton Nelson's curator insight, December 16, 2015 11:14 AM

I believe migrants should be allowed to migrate to their destination. But there should of course be policies as to how many people come to one area at a time and such. In my opinion the main problem lies with those who exploit the border and migrate illegally as well as those who don't belong such as terrorists. Once this is resolved migration from Mexico to the United States or to anywhere will be much smoother. CN

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Global Refugee Crisis

"This video shows you why the refugees crossing the Mediterranean by boat can't just fly to Europe."


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Population-refugee,asylum seeker, not internally displaced person. FRQ #3 2015

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2015 2:30 PM

Not since the end of World War II have there been so many refugees seeking safety.  There are several regional hot spots of political, ethnic and religious turmoil; many are now asking how the global community should response to the worst refugee crisis in generations.


Tags: migration, political, refugees.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, June 19, 2015 9:35 AM

Global population shakeup.

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200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized

200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

 Update on immigration. Where have immigrants to the U.S. come from? Natalia Bronshtein, a professor and consultant who runs the blog Insightful Interaction, created this fascinating visualization of the number of immigrants to the U.S. since 1829 by country of origin. The graph hints at tragic events in world history. The first influx of Irish occurred during the […]

Nancy Watson's insight:

Population unit. Update on immigration

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How Cultures Move Across Continents

How Cultures Move Across Continents | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Researchers have mapped the travels of 150,000 artists, politicians and religious leaders over the past 2,000 years. The videos reveal how cultural achievements ebb and flow across the U.S and Europe.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Interactive map of migration of the west

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Where Do the Smartest People Move?

Where Do the Smartest People Move? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A new report finds that higher intelligence is linked with rural-to-city migration, and with city-to-suburb movement.
Nancy Watson's insight:

interesting Finish study on where "smart" people move.

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Urbanites Flee China’s Smog for Blue Skies

Urbanites Flee China’s Smog for Blue Skies | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
China is undergoing a surprising reverse migration: As millions leave to find work in the cities, some well-educated urban dwellers are relocating to small towns.
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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

Via Seth Dixon
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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:20 AM

This video shows the place matters; a Washington D.C. educator shows how food deserts and other spatial problems of poverty impact his students on a daily basis.  We usually look at life expectancy data at the national scale and that obscures some of the real issues of poverty in developed countries.  Above is a map that shows the Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was recently added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit).  Here are some maps and data from the World Bank that utilizes the Gini Index as well as an interactive Gapminder graph.  


Tags: industry, location, place, migration, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic.

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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The changing origins of U.S. immigrants

The changing origins of U.S. immigrants | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Back in 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they tend to come from Asia and Africa.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:17 PM

From these statistics i dont think the biggest change is the latin american immigrant population but the european population. The european went from 13% to 8 % of the total make up of immigrant population. Thats a 60% decline, and that tells me that the attraction of living in America has diwendled while the EU market is on the rise. I think this is from the growing economies of the EU market and also the fact that the US has been improving in many of the leading statistics such as education, child care, and quality of life. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:58 AM

Is not a surprise that illegal immigrants have been decreasing since 2007, because the economy crisis and the borders.   

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:34 PM

Immigration has been an ongoing issue and the problem of border hopping doesn't make it any better. Of course numbers are going to vary from year to year. This article discusses where US immigrants come from and how the immigration changes over time. In 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they mostly come from Asia and Africa. Also, these statistics are only based off of legal immigrations. We cant forget the ones that just hop the border in their free time. As stated in the article, it has been estimated that there are about 11.1 million illegal immigrants in the United States. A majority of them come from Latin America and the Caribbean. With that being said, legal immigrants still make up the biggest chunk of the foreign population in the United States and the population only continues to grow.