Mrs. Watson's Class
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Education Around the World

Education Around the World | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"A glimpse inside the life of students from Senegal to Vietnam and China."


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What does this do to your ethnocentric beliefs?

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Tony Hall's curator insight, March 11, 2013 8:48 PM

Little bit different to my school:)

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 4:57 PM

Students in China take their college entrance exam lasting 9hours. To prevent cheating they all take it at the same time with 1,200 in an exam hall. In Guangdong province, on July 9, 2007. 


Alicia Grace Lawson O'Brien's curator insight, July 16, 2014 3:07 PM

This picture is amazing to me! It is so difficult to think about how different education looks in other countries.

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2017 APHG Professional Development

2017 APHG Professional Development | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"One of the greatest aspects of the APHG reading is the professional networking, collaboration and sharing that happens with this enthusiastic set of high school and college educators.  In addition to the fun evening activities, every year we also hold several professional development activities in the evening."

 

On Tuesday evening, June 6th, we had an incredibly dynamic guest speaker with a gift for making his research relevant to his audience.  Chris McMorran talk was entitled, “Geographies of Home: producing home across scale in Japan and Singapore.”  He generously provided the digital copy of his PPTx slides with his permission to use them in your classrooms (High Resolution with multimedia-70 MB, Medium Resolution with multimedia-57 MB, Low Resolution without multimedia-15 MB). 

On Wednesday evening, June 7th we had our annual "Night of the Round Tables" event.  This event was designed to create a place to share new ideas, pick up lesson plans, discover new resources, and develop strategies for teaching geography.  Presenters had 15 minutes to present.  Below are the digital copies of the presentations and the handouts that they wanted to share:

Amy Potter: Food SecurityStephanie Hoffman: One-Minute Map videoEric Cain: Cultural landscape pictures analysisPenny Anderson: Song Stories Chemical Workers songKim Schiller: Women's Economic Empowerment Lesson PlanAnnette Parkhurst: ARTICLE - Consumption Factor Jared Diamond, ARTICLE - Is farming the root of all evil, ARTICLE - The apple that never browns, ARTICLE -Worst Mistake in Human History, NOTE - Response to Green and Diamond, Taboo-Pictionary Review.Rik Katz: Industrial Revolution Powerpoint!, Industrialization game, Industrialization game & Analysis, industrialization SIM geo analysis, Microsoft PowerPoint - Industrial Revolution Powerpoint!, The Urban Game, Urban Game Instructions PowerPoint, Urban SIM updated 3-16-2017, Urban Game with Analysis.Dan Snyder: Flipped Classrooms in APHGRebecca Roth: Inquiry chart assessment, Inquiry Question Cities, Inquiry Question Cities2, Inquiry Question, Inquiry Question2, Link #1, Link #2, Link #3, Link#4.Leslie Whitlow: Geography of GenderMike Meyer: Vocab Power PyramidAdditional Presenter: Space Shuttle Challenge Lesson PlanRobin Foster: Giant World MapAmy Stalker:  my immigration DBQ, my urban DBQ

Tags: APHG, teacher training, geography education.


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Excellent presentation and resources.
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How a Steel Box Changed the World: A Brief History of Shipping

"As the container shipping industry continues to boom, companies are adopting new technologies to move cargo faster and shifting to crewless ships. But it’s not all been smooth sailing and the future will see fewer players stay above water."


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Unit 6 
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 27, 6:32 AM

Trade and containerisation.

Launceston College Geography's curator insight, February 28, 5:46 PM

Impacts of transport developments on the process of globalisation - containerisation of shipping.

Matt Manish's curator insight, March 1, 7:50 PM
I found this video to be quite informative about the process of shipping goods throughout the world. I didn't know that 95% of world wide goods are shipped in container vessels. I also never really put much thought into how goods were shipped before watching this video. One piece of information that stuck out to me was that not too long ago ships would spend more time loading cargo at ports than they would actually traveling. That was until the idea of using containers to ship goods on top of shipping vessels was developed. It seems like such a simple idea, but is truly one that has changed the shipping industry forever. This container system saves time, energy, money, and is indeed the most effective way to ship goods throughout the world.
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The Age of Borders

The Age of Borders | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"The creation date of (almost) every international border.  Full-size image here."

 

Tags: infographic, worldwide, borders, political, historical.


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Political Unit: History of  borders
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 27, 6:33 AM

Preliminary - Political Geography 

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The History of Appalachian English: Why We Talk Differently | Appalachian Magazine

The History of Appalachian English: Why We Talk Differently | Appalachian Magazine | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Nancy Watson's insight:
Unit 3 Language 
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The Ruins of a Retail Meltdown Become Unlikely Hotbeds of Gentrification

The Ruins of a Retail Meltdown Become Unlikely Hotbeds of Gentrification | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
While its shuttered department stores cause headaches around the U.S., Sears’s massive 1920s warehouses represent a triumph of post-industrial urbanism.
Nancy Watson's insight:
From 1920 catalog warehouses to post industrial gentrification, Sears is still changing the urban landscape. 
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Which Countries Have Shrinking Populations?


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2017 4:02 PM

This video explores some of the impacts of a declining population on a country (for example, a smaller workforce, economic decline, and growing public debt).  Eastern Europe as a region is used as the principle example and the countries of Bulgaria, Moldova, and Japan are highlighted. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, models, migration, Bulgaria, Moldova, Japan.

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Faces of the world's extreme poor

Faces of the world's extreme poor | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Renée Byer has spent years capturing stories of those living in poverty, for a new traveling photo exhibit, "Living on a Dollar a Day"

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Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language?

Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
There are 7,000 languages spoken on Earth. What are the costs — and benefits — of our modern-day Tower of Babel?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 2017 10:40 AM

These two podcasts are great mainstream looks at issues that filled with cultural geography content.  So many languages on Earth is clearly inefficient (the EU spends $1 billion per year on translation), and yet, linguistic diversity is such a rich part of humanity's cultural heritage.  Listen to the first episode, Why Don't We All Speak the Same Language? as well as the follow-up episode, What Would Be the Best Universal Language?

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, regions, diffusiontechnology.

Andrew Kahn's curator insight, November 4, 2017 8:13 PM
Culture speaks louder than words
 
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'They're Scared': Immigration Fears Exacerbate Migrant Farmworker Shortage

'They're Scared': Immigration Fears Exacerbate Migrant Farmworker Shortage | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Some growers say that President Trump's anti-immigrant rhetoric has made a chronic worker shortage even worse.
Nancy Watson's insight:
Unit 2 Migration & Unit 5 Agriculture. Perspective on immigration laws and quotas. 
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Older millennials are leaving the city for a new kind of suburb

Older millennials are leaving the city for a new kind of suburb | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Older millennials are ditching the city for a new kind of suburb that offers the convenience of high-quality grocery stores and boutique fitness centers without the hustle and bustle of urban life.
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Senators Renew Call to Ratify Law of the Sea Treaty to Help Chart Future of the Arctic - USNI News

Senators Renew Call to Ratify Law of the Sea Treaty to Help Chart Future of the Arctic - USNI News | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Two key senators have renewed a more than 30-year-old United States call to ratify the Law of the Sea Treaty in order to have a seat at the table involving the Arctic’s future. Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), chair of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, said Wednesday by not ratifying the 1982 United Nations …
Nancy Watson's insight:
Unit 4 Political.  UNCLOS. Laws of the Sea. Thanks Jody Smothers Marcelo 
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Instagram account Everyday Africa tries to change perceptions - BBC News

Instagram account Everyday Africa tries to change perceptions - BBC News | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The photographers trying to change perceptions of Africa.
Nancy Watson's insight:
Population unit. Images of Africa to offset stereotypes about Africa FRQ2017
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'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before

'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Shrinking GDP and a falling population are poised to turn Japan into what economists call a "demographic time bomb," and other countries could be next.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:
Population unit 
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 20, 2017 10:34 PM

Preliminary HSc - Global challenges: Population

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:01 PM

The article headline is quite click-baity, but there is some real substance to this article.  The graphs are especially useful to teach concepts such as population momentum and the age-dependency ratio. These were the key parts of the article that caught my eye:

  • An aging population will mean higher costs for the government, a shortage of pension and social security-type funds, a shortage of people to care for the very aged, slow economic growth, and a shortage of young workers.
  • Following feminism's slow build in Japan since the 1970s, today's workers strive for equality between the sexes, something Japan's pyramid-style corporate structure just isn't built for. That's because institutional knowledge is viewed as a big deal in Japan.
  • The elderly now make up 27% of Japan's population. In the US, the rate is only 15%. Experts predict the ratio in Japan could rise to 40% by 2050. With that comes rising social-security costs, which the shrinking younger generations are expected to bear.
  • To make up for an aging population and aversion toward immigrant work, Japan's tech sector has stepped up its efforts in robotics and artificial intelligence.

Tags: culture, genderlabor, populationmigration, JapanEast Asia.

josiewern's curator insight, December 8, 2017 4:33 AM

unit 2 article 1              2

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How Dollar General Is Transforming Rural America

How Dollar General Is Transforming Rural America | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Dollar General stores thrive in low-income rural towns, and the deep-discount chain has opened hundreds of new shops in the past year."

 

Dollar General is set to open 1,000 locations this year, for a total of more than 14,000 stores. It will have more stores than McDonald's has restaurants in the entire country. That includes plenty of urban locations, but the chain's bright yellow and black signs pop up about every 10 miles along many remote state highways. Like Walmart, it has rural roots. Dollar General started in small-town Kentucky. Al Cross, who runs the Institute for Rural Journalism at the University of Kentucky, says Dollar General competes with the world's largest retailer on price and convenience.

 

Tags: rural, retail, podcast.


Via Seth Dixon
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Development
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Matt Manish's curator insight, March 15, 7:49 PM
I found this article to be very relevant since the first Dollar General store I've ever seen just popped up within the last year in Rhode Island. Apparently Dollar General is such a big chain in the rest of the country, that it has more stores than Walmart does. According to this article, there are certain advantages and disadvantages of Dollar General building stores in the rural parts of the country. For example this article talks about how people in some rural areas have towns that are so small they don't have any local grocers. So when a Dollar General is built in a town like that, it is a huge benefit to the town. In other cases with small towns that already have a local grocery store, Dollar General can put that store out of business with the difference in their prices. Ultimately, whether or not Dollar General's expansion into rural areas of the U.S. can be seen as negative or positive depends on the local business structure in those small towns.
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Italy's regional divisions

"150 years after its unification, Italy remains riven by regional differences." For more of these videos, visit http://arcg.is/1IeK3dT


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:
Italian regions. I will report back on Tuscany in May!
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Matt Manish's curator insight, March 15, 8:16 PM
What is interesting about Italy is that the region it is in has been around for and has influenced world culture for thousands of years. But Italy as a nation is fairly new as it was only developed into a unified state 150 years ago. What is also interesting about Italy's geography is that many cultural and economic trends differ from the Northern part to the Southern part of the country. For example, a person in Northern Italy is likely to make twice as much income as someone in Southern Italy. Adding to that, as far as culture goes, there is also a division among the different dialects throughout the North and South of Italy as well. As a result of this information, one can see how important it is to not lump an entire nation into one category for it is made up of various elements from the different divisions and opinions among it's people.
brielle blais's curator insight, March 25, 1:18 PM
This showcases geography because it is an example of how a country can be so divided even though everyone is from the same homeland. However, to Italians, their geographic location in Italy is very important. People take a lot of pride in which region they are from, whether it's between the politics of the north and south Italy or the different dialects spoken between the different regions. The divided is also seen economically as northern Italy is wealthier, and southern Italy is filled with more poverty and unemployment. 
tyrone perry's curator insight, April 18, 11:18 PM
The disunity in Italy has been going on for centuries.  With the north and south basically completely different and divided.  The north is wealthier than the south.  Dialect and language even differ With the two. In the south poverty and unemployment is high.  A Majority of italys prime ministers came from the north.  Many people in the north want to to get full independence for the south.
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North Carolina Congressional Map Ruled Unconstitutionally Gerrymandered

North Carolina Congressional Map Ruled Unconstitutionally Gerrymandered | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The ruling was the first time that a federal court had blocked a congressional map because the judges believed it to be a partisan gerrymander.
Nancy Watson's insight:
Unit 4 political
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The Divide Between America’s Prosperous Cities and Struggling Small Towns—in 20 Charts

The Divide Between America’s Prosperous Cities and Struggling Small Towns—in 20 Charts | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
About 1 in 7 Americans lives in rural parts of the country—1,800 counties that sit outside any metropolitan area. A generation ago, most of these places had working economies, a strong social fabric and a way of life that drew a steady stream of urban migrants. Today, many are in crisis.
Nancy Watson's insight:
Urban and rural changes in population and economic development 
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FIRST INDIGENOUS MAP OF ITS KIND; U.S. MAP DISPLAYS “OUR OWN NAMES AND LOCATIONS”

FIRST INDIGENOUS MAP OF ITS KIND; U.S. MAP DISPLAYS “OUR OWN NAMES AND LOCATIONS” | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Nancy Watson's insight:
I lived briefly in the Indian Territory (now Oklahoma) where there are a number of resevation and nations throughout the state who were sent there by the US govt. Sad that so many proud nations are now gone 
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The Disturbing History of the Suburbs

The Disturbing History of the Suburbs | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Redlining: the racist housing policy from the Jim Crow era that still affects us today.
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Redlining may be illegal, but is it perpetuated in the suburbs?
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More than 200,000 Kids Are Trying to Escape ‘Ethnic Cleansing’ in Myanmar, UN Says

More than 200,000 Kids Are Trying to Escape ‘Ethnic Cleansing’ in Myanmar, UN Says | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Many have been separated from their families and are making the dangerous journey alone.

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Myanmar and the Rohingya

Myanmar and the Rohingya | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
In this lesson students learn more about the Rohingya people of Myanmar and the current conflict.
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10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex

10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Roughly half the countries around the world experience low fertility rates, and some get pretty creative in how they encourage procreation.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:
Population growth and decline provide a paradox. Some contries are pursuing aggressive anti-natalist policies, while others agressively promote pro-natalist policies. 
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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 7, 2017 7:23 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates. While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates. Denmark Russia Japan Romania Singapore South Korea India (Parsis community) Italy Hong Kong Spain
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:55 PM

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 2017 1:21 PM
Examples of pro-natalist countries.
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Grit: The power of passion and perseverance

Grit: The power of passion and perseverance | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn't the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. Here, she explains her theory of "grit" as a predictor of success.
Nancy Watson's insight:
To all former and future APHG students, listen and use this knowledge. 
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Residue (Shape of You Parody)

Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat: @petefarmbros http://www.facebook.com/petersonfarmbros http://www.petersonfarmbros.com CLICK HERE TO WATCH ALL OF OU
Nancy Watson's insight:
The Peterson Brothers have a number of musical parodies related to farming. They are a fun way to introduce students to life on a farm.
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2017 APHG Test Debrief

"All the tweets regarding the 2017 APHG exam from the official social media outlet of College Board, Trevor Packer, Vice President of Advanced Placement."


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2017 APHG  exam info from CBs Trevor Packer
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