Mrs. Watson's Class
41.9K views | +2 today
Follow
Mrs. Watson's Class
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

As Climate Change Accelerates, Floating Cities Look Like Less of a Pipe Dream

As Climate Change Accelerates, Floating Cities Look Like Less of a Pipe Dream | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A costly plan to build floating islands shows how climate change is pushing the search for innovative solutions, but some critics ask who will ultimately benefit.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 3, 3:59 PM

As coastal communities are considering what the tangible impacts of climate change might be, things that were once considered science fiction could be a part of how people adapt to the modifications we've collectively made to our global environment that we depend on to sustain life.  

 

Tags: physicaltechnologysustainability, climate change, environment, resources, watercoastal, environment dependenvironment adapt, environment modify.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 14, 7:49 PM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships, Geographic Perspective.
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Do Rivers Curve?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
YEC Geo's curator insight, December 7, 2014 8:15 PM

Actually a very good video.  My one quibble is with the introduction, when the narrator talks about mountain streams "carving" their gorges.  The puzzle of how small streams could possibly carve out deep bedrock canyons is an ongoing research problem, and is difficult to resolve from a gradualistic perspective.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:15 AM

So pretty much, the water controls rivers rather than particles controlling the river. Also, it appears that the motion and strength of the water causes rivers to bend and form in different curves. I'd like to think of it as a ball bouncing from side to side and every time it touches the border land of a river, it expands to the opposite side. However, when the water flow is hitting the side of a river, the opposite side is not getting any force from the water flow. In that case, the side that is not getting hit by the water flow slowly moves to the side that is being by the water flow causing river curves.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:07 AM

Australian curriculum


The geomorphic processes that produce landforms, including a case study of at least one landform (ACHGK050)


GeoWorld

Chapter 1: Distinctive landform features

Chapter 3: Restless Earth: geomorphic processes 

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S.

Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S. | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Maps and charts updated weekly show the latest extent of the drought in the United States.

Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Whether global warming or just one of the heat and cooling cycles, this drought is extensive and making an impact on food prices.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2014 2:58 PM

I've shared numerous links here about the drought situation in California over the past few months, but the situation extends far beyond California as these animated maps and charts demonstrate. Some of the best public data on drought can be found at the National Drought Mitigation Center


Tags: wateragriculture, environmentresources, environment depend, physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Popocatépetl

Popocatépetl | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 29, 2013 1:11 PM

Among active volcanos in the world, this would be an extremly devastating one if it were to explode.  Less than 50 miles from Mexico City, which is home to more than 20 million people in its entirety could be of threat.  Just this year in July, there was steam and ash released which cancelled flights in and out of Mexico City and Toluca.  That's a mere fraction of what could happen if this volcano had a full-blown explosion.  On a lighter note, on days with good weather, this volcano is quite a spectacle of nearby cities and is the second highest peak in Mexico.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, October 31, 2014 11:39 PM

This is a active volcano, the last eruption was on 2013 (a year ago), It is the second highest volcano in Mexico. Popocatépetl means "montaña que humea" (wet mountain). I love everything that have to be with nature, Volcano are a very interesting creation of nature. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:01 PM

Amazing volcano located in pueblo Mexico, located in the eastern half of Mexico and is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico. its been around for awhile and just recently in 94 got active its a very important part of Mexico and is very interesting to look at from your own perspective.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Impact: Earth!

Impact: Earth! | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 23, 2013 2:17 PM

Given the recent meteor in Russia, interest has been high on the subject.  Have you every wanted to simulate a the impact of a meteorite?  Then this is just what you've always wanted. If you would rather to see an incredibly entertaining clip from the Daily Show, then knock yourself out (disclaimer: it's a VERY irreverant look at the the dash-cam footage from Russia that many just discovered after the meteor hit last week).  

Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, February 25, 2013 5:56 AM

¡¡Realmente, acongoja un poquito!!

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:00 PM

this is interesting, as one rarely thinks about what is involved in a meteor hitting the planet. try it, the results might terrify you.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Tornado Alley

Tornado Alley | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Interested in learning about tornado alley? Then you'll want to read our tornado alley facts and information. Tornado Alley 101

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 10, 2016 11:10 AM

This map nicely shows the particular air requirements needed for a tornado to form and why the part of the United States known as Tornado Alley accounts for the majority of the world's tornadoes.  This nicely shows how physical geographic factors form a major part of how a region might be defined and conceptualized. 

 

Tags: tornado, physical, weather and climate, visualization, regions.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 16, 2016 5:35 PM

Atmospheric hazard

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 17, 2016 5:56 AM
USA Tornado
Rescooped by Nancy Watson from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Worst Hurricane

Worst Hurricane | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"What's the worst Hurricane anyone in your town remembers?""


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Nancy Watson's insight:

Andrew  was bad, Katrina was most memorable

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:57 AM

Click here to see a higher resolution version of this map (don't dismiss it as just a cartoon!).  


Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 21, 2014 1:24 AM

The worst Hurricane that I remember is Hurricane "Katrina" in 2005. I was living in Puerto Rico but I remember seen the devastating news. The largest number of deaths occurred in New Orleans, which was flooded because its levee system failed. Also "Katrina" was the hurricane that has caused more economic damage as well as one of the five deadliest hurricanes, in the history of the United States. It was a very sad event. I hope that does not happen again.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, October 29, 2014 1:51 PM

My father is actually good friends with a guy who he went to school with that specifically help clean up after natural disasters such as hurricanes. I got to talk to him for a little bit about hurricane Katrina, since that was his most recent natural disaster that he helped with at the time. He said it was probably one of the, if not the worst of the natural disaster to help clean and rebuild. He spent the most time with that natural disaster than any others he said. From de-flooding homes, to destroying homes, to rebuilding homes was one of the most strenuous things he has ever had to do in his career.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Pangaea and Plate Tectonics

The supercontinent Pangaea, with its connected South America and Africa, broke apart 200 million years ago. But the continents haven't stopped shifting -- the tectonic plates beneath our feet (in Earth's two top layers, the lithosphere and the asthenosphere) are still traveling at about the rate your fingernails grow. Michael Molina discusses the catalysts and consequences of continental drift.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:03 PM

Plate tectonics have alot to do with the world and how the world will evolve and in which way it will tranform in specific places. Pangaea involves not only Africa but also South America and how they broke away from the rest of the contenents about 200 million years ago. This idea involves the reality that the continents never stop shifting and the top two layer's of the Earth still grow at the rate of our finger nails grow. Divergent and Convergent boundries are apparent in the Earths ability to shift and eith come together or dive apart.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 26, 2014 4:55 PM

Very interesting that the earth has changed and continues to change. The continents have been separated over time and the example is there as Michael Molina explains that the continents of Africa and South America were once united as they have found remains of dinosaurs in eastern South America and West Africa.

April Howard's curator insight, February 13, 2015 1:36 PM

Visual Explanation of Pangaea and Plate Tectonics

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East

NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
A new study using data from a pair of gravity-measuring NASA satellites finds that large parts of the arid Middle East region lost freshwater reserves rapidly during the past decade.

 

"[This] data show an alarming rate of decrease in total water storage in the Tigris and Euphrates river basins, which currently have the second fastest rate of groundwater storage loss on Earth, after India," said Jay Famiglietti, principal investigator of the study and a hydrologist and professor at UC Irvine. "The rate was especially striking after the 2007 drought. Meanwhile, demand for freshwater continues to rise, and the region does not coordinate its water management because of different interpretations of international laws."

 

Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend, Middle East, Iraq.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 10:00 PM

This is a perfect example of geospatial technologies can lead to a better understanding of how the Earth's physical systems are changing because of human geography.  Teaching geography is about showing how these systems are interconnected.   

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 9:24 AM

Water is a big issue in an arid area.  The fact that we can measure the amount of groundwater present in an area with a satellite is amazing to me.  The issue of water rights and control in this region will someday over take that of oil rights and use in my opinion.  Once people get used to free flowing water to use on demand it will cause problems politically when these sources of ground water inevitably dry up.

Rescooped by Nancy Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cows make less milk in hot sticky weather

Cows make less milk in hot sticky weather | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Research news from leading universities...

 

Sometimes whe teach human geography as though it is not connected to physical geography.  The geographical distribution patterns of agriculture are some of the most highly correlated human activities to the physical environment.  This one, dairy productivity, changes greatly based on temperatures, humidity and latitude. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.