Mrs. Watson's Class
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The Disturbing History of the Suburbs

The Disturbing History of the Suburbs | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Redlining: the racist housing policy from the Jim Crow era that still affects us today.
Nancy Watson's insight:
Redlining may be illegal, but is it perpetuated in the suburbs?
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Grit: The power of passion and perseverance

Grit: The power of passion and perseverance | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn't the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. Here, she explains her theory of "grit" as a predictor of success.
Nancy Watson's insight:
To all former and future APHG students, listen and use this knowledge. 
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McMansions Are Killing L.A.'s Urban Forest

McMansions Are Killing L.A.'s Urban Forest | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The compact suburban bungalows of the 1950s were actually pretty tree-friendly by comparison.
Nancy Watson's insight:
Urban and cultural units
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Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 10:18 AM
Unit 3 - Cultural Landscape, Unit 7 - Urban Sprawl 
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Gullah Culture

"While Gullah was not originally a written language and has never had a governing authority or dictionary, linguistic scholars have found that the language is internally consistent and in some ways more efficient and expressive than standard English. Elements of the language have seeped into African-American Vernacular English across the country."

 

For the first time in recent memory, the Charleston County School Board is discussing how to address the specific needs of Gullah and Geechee students, children of a culture whose linguistic origins trace back to the west coast of Africa via the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Some teachers have said the students' way of speaking — whether in the heavily West African-influenced Gullah language or in the more Anglicized dialects sometimes known as Geechee — can present an obstacle to understanding in the classroom. Like many Lowcountry Gullah speakers of her generation, the current head of state for the Gullah/Geechee Nation carries painful memories of adults who taught her to hold her family's way of speaking in contempt.

 

Tags: language, culture, race, education, historical.


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Alex Smiga's curator insight, May 31, 10:58 AM
A truly unique gem of American culture, absolutely fascinating.
Mr Mac's curator insight, July 10, 11:26 AM
Unit 3 - Folk Culture, Regions, Language, race/ethnicity
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France’s ‘Burkini’ Bans Are About More Than Religion or Clothing

France’s ‘Burkini’ Bans Are About More Than Religion or Clothing | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The bans on full-body swimsuits are not primarily about protecting Muslim women from patriarchy, but about shielding France’s non-Muslims from a changing world.
Nancy Watson's insight:
France has fiercely protected many aspects of its culture. In a globalized world, is this creating a centripetal or centrifugal force, or both for them?
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Ecotourism in Australia

Ecotourism in Australia | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Ecotourism strives to protect the native cultures and environments of destinations while entertaining and informing tourists of all ages. For many years people within the tourism industry have debated what destinations and practices truly qualify as ecotourism without reaching a definitive consensus."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 2016 5:04 PM

Ecotourism is an important aspect of Australia’s success. The Australian Government produced a website, that is dedicated to the tourism and ecotourism industry.  There is a debate of land claims between the Australian Government and indigenous people. The cultural difference plays a significant role in the success of ecotourism because tourists enjoy the cultural heritage. The separation has created social, political, and economic reasons to be involved or not in ecotourism. The Australian Government has developed certificates and policies to allow aborigines rights of their land.

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentindigenous, ecology, Australia, Oceania.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, July 10, 2016 2:46 AM
Ecotourism in Australia
Sally Egan's curator insight, July 18, 2016 9:08 PM
The trend for Ecotourism is presented in this article with questions raised about what practises fulfil the requirements of truly ecotourism. Appropriate to the future directions of Tourism as a global economic activity.
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Czech Republic poised to change name to 'Czechia'

Czech Republic poised to change name to 'Czechia' | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The Czech Republic is expected to change its name to "Czechia" to make it easier for companies and sports teams to use it on products and clothing.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2016 9:12 AM

That sound you hear is cartographers and database managers gasping at the joy and shock of need to updata all their data and maps.  Old maps still show Czechoslovakia, maybe on date in the future someone will be excited to find "The Czech Republic" on the map as much as I was fascinated to discover Hindustan on a 19th century globe. I also enjoyed this quote from the Czech foreign minister: “It is not good if a country does not have clearly defined symbols or if it even does not clearly say what its name is."  

 

Tag: Czechia, languagetoponyms, culture.

Laura Brown's curator insight, April 15, 2016 11:22 AM

Marketing and media are the new gods. Can't imagine the power they have in order to cause a country to change it's name. Not so long ago battles and wars were fought over cultural identity, now it's for sale. 

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Empire, Republic, Democracy: A History of Turkey

"The curriculum 'Empire, Republic, Democracy: A History of Turkey' traces the final years of the Ottoman Empire, the birth of the Turkish Republic, and contemporary issues in Turkey. Learn more at www.choices.edu/turkey "


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2015 4:49 PM

This video is a great introduction to the Choices Program's new unit on Turkey...a country that is truly a bridge between the Middle East and Europe, without being fully in either.   This unique global position makes Turkey a very important country to understand both culturally and politically.


Tags: politicalculture, Turkeyhistorical.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:24 PM

Turkey has always been a country that I find interesting. So many amazing architectural structures and landscapes. I have two friends from high school who work there in the peace corps. I asked them what it's like and they couldn't really describe it. They said it isn't really Arabic but it certainly isn't western either. This was a good introductory video on the area.

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Generation Like – FRONTLINE

Generation Like – FRONTLINE | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
FRONTLINE explores how the perennial teen quest for identity and connection has migrated to social media – and how big brands are increasingly co-opting young consumers’ digital
Nancy Watson's insight:

Culture. 

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Why eating insects makes sense

The world's population is projected to reach 11 billion by the end of the century. Feeding that many people will be a challenge, and it is further complicated by the impact of climate change on agriculture. That is why some people advocate an unusual way to boost the food supply and feed people sustainably: by eating less meat, and more insects.

http://econ.st/1sDYlfM


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Nancy Watson's insight:

Agriculture, Food security, sustainability, Culture - Yuck factor!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 2015 10:00 AM

While it might make economic, nutritional, and environmental sense, I'm sure that many are squeamish at the idea of insects primarily because in violates many deeply engrained cultural taboos.  The main reasons listed in the video for promoting the production and consumption of more insects:

  1. Insects are healthier than meat.
  2. It is cheap (or free) to raise insects.
  3. Raising insects is more sustainable than livestock.


Questions to Ponder: Would you be willing to try eating insects?  How do you think this idea would go over with your family and friends?  What cultural barriers might slow the diffusion of this practice?    


Tagsfoodculturediffusioncultural norms, economicfood production, agriculture.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, June 8, 2015 9:33 AM

When speaking of sustainability, many seek new options, new and more efficient—productively speaking—ways of exploiting resources, different types of energies to make up for the missing future expected quota. However, at not point do they seem to ask themselves what makes inefficiency be the norm, and scarcity the automatic reason to why we need more. The solution is right there, in front of our eyes, and not necessarily in the form of insects., though under the current monetary and economic paradigm, that may seem like a good option.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:31 PM

While it might make economic, nutritional, and environmental sense, I'm sure that many are squeamish at the idea of insects primarily because in violates many deeply engrained cultural taboos.  The main reasons listed in the video for promoting the production and consumption of more insects:

  1. Insects are healthier than meat.
  2. It is cheap (or free) to raise insects.
  3. Raising insects is more sustainable than livestock.

 

Questions to Ponder: Would you be willing to try eating insects?  How do you think this idea would go over with your family and friends?  What cultural barriers might slow the diffusion of this practice?    

 

Tagsfoodculturediffusioncultural norms, economic, food production, agriculture.

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Korean language shift causing North-South tension

Korean language shift causing North-South tension | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
The widening divide between North and South Korea’s shared language is leading to confusion, hurt feelings and suspicion.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Good for the Culture, Political inits 

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How a Buddhist shrine transformed a neighborhood

How a Buddhist shrine transformed a neighborhood | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"Sometimes, rehabilitating a rough neighborhood is a tough process. But in one West Coast American city, it was as simple as adding a Buddha statue.  Since the statue's installation, a street corner has been transformed from a notorious eyesore to a daily prayer spot for local Vietnamese Buddhists.  For this Geo Quiz, we're looking for the city where this shrine is located — can you name it?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 9, 2014 7:51 AM

This podcast is a great glimpse into an urban transformation that took place without any central planning nor can the changes be classified as gentrification. 


Tags: neighborhood, place, culture, economic, urban.

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The roots of Nigeria's religious and ethnic conflict

The roots of Nigeria's religious and ethnic conflict | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Analysis: A British colonial decision brought the northern and southern halves of modern Nigeria together. One hundred years later, they still don't get along.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Lasting effects of colonialism and shatterbelt effects of religious conflict create economic and political conflict that divide .

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Isabelle McCreless's curator insight, March 13, 2016 12:16 AM

Lasting effects of colonialism and shatterbelt effects of religious conflict create economic and political conflict that divide .

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Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language?

Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
There are 7,000 languages spoken on Earth. What are the costs — and benefits — of our modern-day Tower of Babel?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 10:40 AM

These two podcasts are great mainstream looks at issues that filled with cultural geography content.  So many languages on Earth is clearly inefficient (the EU spends $1 billion per year on translation), and yet, linguistic diversity is such a rich part of humanity's cultural heritage.  Listen to the first episode, Why Don't We All Speak the Same Language? as well as the follow-up episode, What Would Be the Best Universal Language?

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, regions, diffusiontechnology.

Andrew Kahn's curator insight, November 4, 8:13 PM
Culture speaks louder than words
 
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'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before

'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Shrinking GDP and a falling population are poised to turn Japan into what economists call a "demographic time bomb," and other countries could be next.

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Nancy Watson's insight:
Population unit 
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 20, 10:34 PM

Preliminary HSc - Global challenges: Population

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 9:01 PM

The article headline is quite click-baity, but there is some real substance to this article.  The graphs are especially useful to teach concepts such as population momentum and the age-dependency ratio. These were the key parts of the article that caught my eye:

  • An aging population will mean higher costs for the government, a shortage of pension and social security-type funds, a shortage of people to care for the very aged, slow economic growth, and a shortage of young workers.
  • Following feminism's slow build in Japan since the 1970s, today's workers strive for equality between the sexes, something Japan's pyramid-style corporate structure just isn't built for. That's because institutional knowledge is viewed as a big deal in Japan.
  • The elderly now make up 27% of Japan's population. In the US, the rate is only 15%. Experts predict the ratio in Japan could rise to 40% by 2050. With that comes rising social-security costs, which the shrinking younger generations are expected to bear.
  • To make up for an aging population and aversion toward immigrant work, Japan's tech sector has stepped up its efforts in robotics and artificial intelligence.

Tags: culture, genderlabor, populationmigration, JapanEast Asia.

josiewern's curator insight, December 8, 4:33 AM

unit 2 article 1              2

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Escaped pet birds are teaching wild birds to speak English

Escaped pet birds are teaching wild birds to speak English | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
'Hello cockie' is one of the most commonly heard phrases feral birds are teaching in the wild, along with a host of expletives.
Nancy Watson's insight:
Culture and relocation diffusion. Thanks Lisa Benton Short. 
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‘Leftover Women’ in China

‘Leftover Women’ in China | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
"Chinese women face immense pressure to get married before they turn 27. In many Chinese cities, so called marriage markets are a common sight, where parents go to post and match personal ads. A number of brave Chinese women have finally stood up to speak their mind against society’s labels and their parents' pressures."Source: www.youtube.comThis
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momondo – The DNA Journey

It’s easy to think there are more things dividing us than uniting us. But we actually have much more in common with other nationalities than you’d think. I
Nancy Watson's insight:
Population,ethnicity - who are we? Where did we come from? Is prejudice learned or inherent?
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momondo – The DNA Journey

It’s easy to think there are more things dividing us than uniting us. But we actually have much more in common with other nationalities than you’d think. I
Nancy Watson's insight:
For the culture unit 
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Madison Roth's curator insight, April 14, 1:05 PM
This video relates to my human geography class because it relates to ethnicity. I think this video is amazing because it shows a group of people who all look different and think they're of different ethnicity's but when given the results some turned out to be a significant percentage of ethnicity's they despised. In the end it shows that we are all a mixture of everything and there is no single ethnicity, and i like the idea of people realizing that we are all different from each other so in a sense, we are all the same.
kyleigh hall's curator insight, April 21, 3:12 PM
The video "The DNA Journey" is about a group of people that talk about what they think there DNA is and what race they do not think they would like being. They got there DNA back and they were not what the thought they were some were even the race they thought they would not like being. This relates to what we are learning in world cultural geography because we are talking about race and religion right now. My opinion on this video is that i thought it was very neat how they found out the race they were and never knew that.
Peyton Barnes's curator insight, April 24, 11:03 AM
I absolutely love this video. It really represents different ethnicities and races that people didn't even know that they were. In class, we talk about racism, and how people think that other ethnic groups aren't better than theirs. And, it relates well with the people's feelings on other races.
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Our World in Data — Visualising the Empirical Evidence on how the World is Changing

Our World in Data — Visualising the Empirical Evidence on how the World is Changing | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Visualised in graphs I am presenting the long-term data on how we are changing our world. This is the Empirical View on How We Are Making Our World a Better Place. Topic by topic I cover the decline of violence and the increase of tolerance and political rights. Improving living standards, health and well-being; population changes and associated success in preserving our environment. Increasing knowledge about our word and spreading education.
Nancy Watson's insight:

Data source for several units 

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Where The Hell Is Matt?

Where The Hell Is Matt? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it
Dancing 2012» Dancing 2012» Dancing 2008 » Dancing 2006 » More Videos »
Nancy Watson's insight:

Love these videos to show how different the would cultures are and how they are not - everyone loves to dance - even if they are not always good at it.

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Whatever happened to Psy and K-pop’s bid to conquer the world?

Whatever happened to Psy and K-pop’s bid to conquer the world? | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"K-pop sensation Psy was everywhere once but little has been heard since. What happened to him?  Having earned an estimated $55m (£36m) from his work in the West, Psy is now racking up similar amounts from the lucrative Chinese market, where his collaboration with world-class pianist Lang Lang is currently producing a run of consecutive number ones. Psy's decision to focus on the Asian music market may be an indication of where the entertainment industry turns over the highest profits for musicians."


Via Seth Dixon
Nancy Watson's insight:

Pop culture - after Gangnam Style

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 4, 2015 6:17 PM

In 2012, we were analyzing the cultural geography of a viral sensation, that seemed to fizzle out so we dismissed it as a one-hit wonder.  So often we assume that being culturally and economically viable in the West is of greatest importance, but truly savvy brands aren't sleeping on East Asian markets.  This "one-hit wonder" in the West strategically moved on to even larger markets. 


Tags: popular culture, diffusion, globalization, culture, music

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32 Mispronounced Places

32 Mispronounced Places | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

"There’s nothing more irritating to a pedant’s ear and nothing more flabbergasting than realizing you’ve been pronouncing the name of so many places wrong, your entire life! Despite the judgment we exhibit toward people who err in enunciating, we all mispronounce a word from time to time, despite our best efforts. Well, now it’s time we can really stop mispronouncing the following places."


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 20, 2015 11:37 AM

So interesting!  I knew Louisville, only because my husband of almost 18 years is from there and taught me very early in our relationship that it was "Luh-vull".  ha!  

Savannah Rains's curator insight, March 24, 2015 3:14 AM

This fun article is telling people about common places that we butcher the names of. Some of the reasons that we say them wrong is because they are in different languages so we shouldn't be pronouncing everything perfectly. But the ones that we say everyday like Colorado, is because we ALL mispronounce it so it becomes the norm. This article really sheds some light on the way that languages can be misinterpreted or changed because of people.

Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2015 2:16 AM

I love discovering I've mispronounced a word, particularly place names. Most of these are in the US but the few international examples are interesting (and the mispronounced variations are perplexing, perhaps we're blessed in Australia with journalists who can pronounce tricky foreign toponyms). I'm surprised Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia) and Uluru (NT, Australia) don't make the list.

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Forget Midwest. We Are North: Repositioning Minnesota's National Identity for the 21st Century

Forget Midwest. We Are North: Repositioning Minnesota's National Identity for the 21st Century | Mrs. Watson's Class | Scoop.it

“The Midwest is this big nebulous part of the country and it's kind of what's left over after all the other regions of the country are defined. Those regions have much stronger identities if you think of the East Coast or maybe New England or the Pacific Northwest or certainly the South. The Midwest is kind of the catchall for what's left.  We [Minnesota] should be called the North.”


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 9, 2014 1:48 PM

Whether I agree or not with the ideas being discussed, I simply love that this discussion is taking place and how intensely geographical the ideas and evidences being brought forward are.  


Questions to Ponder: So what region do you live in?  What defines that region?  Are there other regions that you can claim to be a part of also?  How would you divide the United States into various regions?  How come?


Tagsplaceregions, culture