Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World
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Catholic Demographics

Catholic Demographics | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
Infographics showing the distribution of the Roman Catholic population in the world, where it has risen and fallen in recent years.

Via Seth Dixon
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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 4:50 PM

Pope Francis is not only the first Jesuit Pope, but the first from the Americas.  Born in Buenos Aires, the Pope represents the immense Catholic population in Latin America.

 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 9, 2015 11:09 PM

It makes sense that Europe has one of the highest rates of Catholicism in the world because Christianity originated in Europe. Also, I believe that it makes sense that more than half of the Catholic population spread southward along the prime meridian to Africa. However, I don't understand how when Catholicism spread overseas, it didn't go to North America before it went to Latin America. So I did some research on that and Catholicism actually spread to the caribbean which is southeast of the United States and it spread mostly towards South America rather than up to North America. However, that doesn't explain why South America has a higher Catholic percentage than Europe. All I know is that Europe use to have a higher percentage of Catholics over Latin America about a century ago but now, Latin America has more Catholics.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 1:21 PM

it makes sense that south America has a large number of Catholics, as it was colonized by Portugal and Spain, which were two of the largest and most constantly catholic countries on earth.

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | Mrs. Nesbitt's Human Geography World | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:12 AM

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:51 AM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:31 PM

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with.