Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class
3.4K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Lindley Amarantos
onto Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class
Scoop.it!

Shrouded by myth, Ukraine's past proves an obstacle to its future

Shrouded by myth, Ukraine's past proves an obstacle to its future | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
Ukrainian historians say that to forge a common identity among eastern and western Ukrainians, both sides must better understand history. The UPA, a WWII-era nationalist militia lionized in the west but feared in the east, is a key example.
more...
No comment yet.
Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lindley Amarantos
Scoop.it!

China is in a muddle over population policy - Gilding the cradle

China is in a muddle over population policy - Gilding the cradle | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
WHEN Li Dongxia was a baby, her parents sent her to be raised by her grandparents and other family members half an hour from their home in the northern Chinese province of Shandong.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lindley Amarantos
Scoop.it!

What I Learned After Taking a Homeless Mother Grocery Shopping

What I Learned After Taking a Homeless Mother Grocery Shopping | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
The fact of the matter is, this homeless mom is me. She is you. Today, nearly one in six Americans reports running out of food at least once a year.
Lindley Amarantos's insight:
AG article #2
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lindley Amarantos
Scoop.it!

Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?

Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

English--Origins and Roots

When we talk about ‘English’, we often think of it as a single language. But what do the dialects spoken in dozens of countries around the world have in common with each other, or with the writings of Chaucer? Claire Bowern traces the language from the present day back to its ancient roots, showing how English has evolved through generations of speakers.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 7, 2017 2:30 PM

English has obviously changed much over the years, but this video (and lesson) also shows some good language family information and traces it back to proto-Indo-European, using the English as the main example.  This other TED-ED video (and lesson) shows how the connotations of English words often times depend on the linguistic root (sweat--Germanic, perspire--Latin).   

 

Tags: languagecultureEnglishTED, video.

Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

When Rich Places Want to Secede

When Rich Places Want to Secede | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
At the core of Catalonia’s separatist movement is an argument that a country’s better-off regions shouldn’t have to pay to cover their less productive counterparts.

 

As a relatively rich region with its own independence movement, Catalonia's not alone: A small set of secession movements in historically productive areas, most visibly in Europe, say they’d be better off on their own, and more are pointing to Catalonia's example to regain momentum.

The common wisdom used to be that separatist movements mostly came from weak minorities that rallied around racial or ethnic injustices. “With globalization, that changed significantly,” said Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics (LSE). “Virtually everywhere in the world,” movements have swapped out the “identity card” for the “economic card.”

Inequality between regions is baked into the entire concept of modern nationhood—if subsidizing poorer parts of a country were motivation enough to split off, every region would have done it by now. Plus, there are economic perks to staying together: Trade is easier across internal borders, and diversified regions diffuse risk.

 

Tags: Catalonia, economic, political, devolution, autonomy, Europe.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Manish's curator insight, January 18, 7:36 PM
In Spain, citizens of Catalonia are seeking secession from Spain for economic purposes. The citizen's of Catalonia are wealthier than most of the rest of the country. Catalonia pays $12 billion more in taxes a year to Madrid than they receive back from Madrid. This seems like a great idea for the citizens of Catalonia because it would help increase their economy in a positive way, but this could have a negative effect on the rest of the country's economy as far as trade goes. Also, this article points out that if secession because of economic differences in regions of a country made enough sense and were easy to do, countries would be doing more all throughout history. From what I can it see, even though Catalonia pays more in taxes every year to Madrid, it would make sense for the nation as a whole for Catalonia not to secede, because if it did it would hurt the economy of the majority of the nation.
Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 16, 8:32 AM
This article is focused on Catalonia and its hopes for secession from Spain. Catalonia wants to secede because it pays in much more than it receives from the government. Catalonia is the wealthiest part of Spain with the exception of Madrid, and they feel as if they are paying to support the poorer regions of Spain, who they believe do not work as hard. The article also references other countries where wealth is unevenly distributed and how this can cause regions to want secession, it also outlines things that would need to happen for secession to be possible, for example another country offering military protection. In the case of Catalonia if they were to secede, what is left of Spain could plummet, they would lose 20% of their GDP overnight, which could cause massive problems for the country. Spain needs to begin preparing for if a Catalonian secession does in fact happen.  
Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Divided island: How Haiti and the DR became two worlds

Haiti and the Dominican Republic share a border, and an island. But the two countries are very different today: the Dominican Republic enjoys higher quality of life for many factors than Haiti. I went to this island and visited both countries, to try and understand when and how their paths diverged.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, February 13, 8:41 PM
This video is extremely interesting seeing as it points out the differences between two very different worlds that are only separated by a single border. The video shows how racist the Dominicans are to their neighbors and shows us how the Haitians live under such scrutiny. On each end of the border, there are two markets that are supposed to allow both the Haitians and the Dominicans to trade their goods, however, the strict border patrol officers keep the Haitians from entering until their neighbors have set up their shops at the best spots. The director of the video also notes that he believes the reason Haiti is much poorer than the Dominican Republic stems all the way back to when they were colonies of France and Spain. 
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 12:47 PM
I found this video to be very insightful into the relationship Haiti has with the Dominican Republic and how the Haitian government has formed into what it is today. It was especially informative for myself because I didn't know very much about these countries before watching this video. I knew Haiti was the first slave colony to have a successful revolt against their slave holders, but I didn't know or realize all the consequences of that slave uprising. It seems like Haiti wasn't given a proper chance right off the bat to succeed as a nation. The French overworked their land and destroyed the soil which is still a problem today. Once Haiti declared independence, many nations enforced embargoes on Haiti because it was considered a threat due to it being a black republic, which strangled their potential for a strong economy. Adding to that France demanded a large sum of money from Haiti after they declared independence because France was upset about losing profits from the colony, which hindered the Haitian economy even more. It's too bad that Haiti got a bad hand of cards right from the beginning, I hope that one day they can rise above adversity, and truly flourish as a nation.
tyrone perry's curator insight, March 14, 10:43 PM
watching this showed many disturbing facts about the island shared by the D.R. and Haiti.  because of both of their previous owners the island went in two different directions.  Haiti owned by the French brought over many slaves to pillage and exploit their side of the Island.  Haiti could not flourish because of racism and debt.  D.R. had a different history the Spaniards integrated with the locals and worked together to help the country grow.  they took care of their land and their was no racism playing any role in destroying the people of that country.  driving up and down the you can see the difference on both sides.  Haiti has a bare and eroded land while the D.R. has lush jungles.  according to the narrator there is strong racism towards the Haitians by the Dominicans.  Even thou they both share the island the Dominicans look down on the Haitians and refuse to help them even thou D.R. is a so to speak rich nation they could really help improve and grow both nations as a whole.  Its sad to see that the reason people cant grow is because of systemic and blatant racism. 
Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex

10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
Roughly half the countries around the world experience low fertility rates, and some get pretty creative in how they encourage procreation.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 7, 2017 7:23 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates. While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates. Denmark Russia Japan Romania Singapore South Korea India (Parsis community) Italy Hong Kong Spain
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:55 PM

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 2017 1:21 PM
Examples of pro-natalist countries.
Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff?

Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff? | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
What is life like in the country projected to have the world's fastest-shrinking population?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 22, 2017 2:24 PM

This is a good case-study to show how demographic decline coupled with economic decline, with exacerbate problems with a  consistent out-migration flow.   

 

Tags: Bulgaria, declining populationpopulationmigration.

Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011)

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011) | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
The map provides a level of detail previously unavailable. It is the first ever to collect data published by all of Europe’s municipalities.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, February 17, 5:08 PM
The population changes in Europe recently seem to be related to both low birth rates and an increase in migration.  Based on this map the most significant patterns seem to be that areas in south Eastern Europe are experiencing great population lows while France and Ireland’s populations are making significant gains.  This trend could most likely be explained by migration.  People in the regions of great population loss are most likely moving northwest in order to fill the many vacancies in Western Europe.  The reason that these vacancies exist is because the population of Europe overall is aging, so there are many spots open from retirees.  At the same time, the birth rates in most of Europe are so low it is causing the overall population of the continent to gradually decrease.  Without domestic workers to fill positions, companies in areas with low birth rates, like France and Spain, are forced to hire foreign employees.  The population loss in the eastern part of Europe seems to be due to migration.  Whereas on farther west, the regions with high population losses, such as Spain, Denmark, and southern Italy, can be explained by low birth rates.  The increased tension recently regarding immigration policies and Great Britain’s exit from the European Union can be explained by these trends.  As people with different ethnic backgrounds who do not speak the languages of the countries they migrate to continue to enter countries in large numbers, many Europeans begin to feel threatened.  This is why there are protests and the rise of political parties who run on anti-immigrant platforms.  
brielle blais's curator insight, March 24, 11:27 AM
Between 2001 and 2011 there has been serious demographic changes occurring all over Europe. The eastern section has seen a lot of suburbanization since the end of the Communist era and the early period of capitalism. There was once a lack of cash and depleating economy but now cities finally have the capital and chance to to build one family homes which allowed for the 2% growth. As for northwestern regions, the population has decreased as impoverished regions in the southwest draw in retiring or downsizing Europeans instead, as they want the sunshine and cheaper prices on things. This article shows how geography can truly shape the rise and fall of demographic in a country. 
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 1:34 PM
This article looks at Europe’ s changing population. Although many cities, like Prague and Bucharest have been experiencing a 1-2% population increase, other countries, such as countries in the east and northwest, have had a 1-2% decrease in population. Similarly, Turkey has a declining population as well. The author of this article argues that this steady decline is occurring because the citizens are leaving the rural countryside to find more job opportunities in the cities.
Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Five gentrification myths debunked

'Gentrification' is a messy bogeyman of a term deserving more critical analysis. If 'gentrification' is 'exclusive economic development', what we want is INCLUSIVE economic development.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 19, 2017 11:09 AM

This post will need many disclaimers, but I think that it is a valuable addition to our gentrification materials since the key take-home point is that gentrification doesn’t happen the same way in all places (geographic context matters!). Some of the generalizations about gentrification around the country might not apply to some specific examples.  Are these generalizations true in some (and possibly most) contexts?  Sure, but unfortunately once people hear the word gentrification, they assume a base set of assumptions about the situation which may or may not be true.  The 5 myths outlined in this video (more detail in this Washington Post article) are:

  1. Gentrification leads to lower crime.
  2. Gentrification causes widespread displacement.
  3. Longtime residents hate gentrification.
  4. Gentrifiers are white.
  5. Gentrification happens naturally.

Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic   

Mr Mac's curator insight, July 6, 2017 8:16 AM
Unit 7 - Gentrifications - specifically addressing "generalizations about Gentrification." 
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:01 PM

This post will need many disclaimers, but I think that it is a valuable addition to our gentrification materials since the key take-home point is that gentrification doesn’t happen the same way in all places (geographic context matters!). Some of the generalizations about gentrification around the country might not apply to some specific examples.  Are these generalizations true in some (and possibly most) contexts?  Sure, but unfortunately once people hear the word gentrification, they assume a base set of assumptions about the situation which may or may not be true.  The 5 myths outlined in this video (more detail in this Washington Post article) are:

  1. Gentrification leads to lower crime.
  2. Gentrification causes widespread displacement.
  3. Longtime residents hate gentrification.
  4. Gentrifiers are white.
  5. Gentrification happens naturally.

Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic   

Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Remote Paradise Island Is Now a Plastic Junkyard

A Remote Paradise Island Is Now a Plastic Junkyard | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
Henderson Island is isolated and uninhabited—but its beaches are still covered in garbage.  

 

Henderson Island (article or podcast) is about the most remote place you can visit without leaving the planet. It sits squarely in the middle of the South Pacific, 3,500 miles from New Zealand in one direction and another 3,500 miles from South America in the other.  Henderson should be pristine. It is uninhabited. Tourists don’t go there. There’s no one around to drop any litter. The whole place was declared a World Heritage Site by the United Nations in 1988. The nearest settlement is 71 miles away, and has just 40 people on it. And yet, seafaring plastic has turned it into yet another of humanity’s scrapheaps.

 

Tags: pollution, Oceania, water, environment, sustainability, consumption.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
M Sullivan's curator insight, November 29, 2017 11:23 PM
Useful for the IDU topic of plastic single use water bottles.
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 26, 1:49 PM
If I had looked at this picture without the context, I would think it was somewhere where people had stayed for a while and then left the place trashed with their own garbage.  In reality,  this is an island that is 3500 miles away from the nearest major settlement and doesn’t have any human inhabitants.  This really exemplifies that even though plastic waste may not be in one’s backyard, it never truly goes away.  Plastic is a material that cannot be broken down, so when it is dumped it just moves around until it hits land.  The article pointed out that plastic is incredibly difficult to clean up, particularly on places like Henderson Island.  When it floats in the ocean for a long time, it becomes brittle and breaks into very small fragments.  Those small fragments then mix with the sand and get buried, making it impossible to get rid of.  Another fact about this island that was shocking is that 3,750 pieces of litter wash up everyday, which is 100,000 times than other islands.  Henderson Island is not suitable for humans to live on, as there is no freshwater, frequent storms, and incredibly sharp terrain.  It is interesting that an island that keeps humans away can’t defend itself against plastic.  The reach of humans extends far beyond what they imagine and even uninhabitable land is infested with human waste.  No matter how remote a place is, it will still be effected by people.
Christina Caruso's curator insight, April 28, 2:55 PM
This picture is Henderson Island, its one of the most remote place you could visit without leaving the planet. It sits in the middle of the South Pacific, 3,500 miles from New Zealand in one direction and another 3,500 from South America in the other. The Island should be pristine, it is uninhabited.  Tourists don't go there and no one around to drop any little.  The whole beach is covered in litter
Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why 80% of Singaporeans live in government-built flats

Why 80% of Singaporeans live in government-built flats | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
Lots of countries show off their public-housing projects, but few are quite as devoted to them as Singapore, where four-fifths of the permanent population live in subsidised units built by the government, most of them as owner-occupiers. The city-state’s suburbs bristle with HDB towers, painted calming pastel hues. This vast national housing system surprises visitors who think of Singapore as a low-tax hub for expatriate bankers and big multinationals. But HDB is a linchpin of economic and social policy and an anchor for the ruling People’s Action Party (PAP), which has led Singapore since independence. It is also a tantalising but tricky model for Singapore’s fast-urbanising neighbours to follow.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 10, 2017 12:39 PM

Singapore is such a fascinating case study.  Over 90% of the Singapore’s land is owned by the government and the American ideal of independent home ownership is seen as antithetical to cultural norms.  The government heavily subsidies young couples to live near their parents and create tight-knit communities with homelessness was eradicated (that’s the optimists’ perspective).  This is all well and good for young, straight couples that choose to support the ruling political party, but critics often point out that the housing focus has also created a paternalistic component to the government that is much stronger in Singapore than in other countries.  This article nicely goes with the 2017 APHG reading professional development talk entitled “The Geographies of Home” that focused on Singaporean and Japanese examples.    

 

Tag: Singapore, urban, neighborhood, economicplanning, housing, cultural norms.

Mr Mac's curator insight, July 24, 2017 9:26 AM
Unit 4 - Political, Government; Unit 7 - Urban Spaces, housing, Urban Planning
Cherise Chng's comment, August 27, 2017 9:50 AM
As a young Singaporean, I am really proud of such an unique architecture that is representable of Singapore. These flats, or what we call HDB, provides us with many Singaporeans with a roof over their head despite land scarcity in Singapore. Some HDB flats has a sky garden while majority of the others has a gathering area on the ground floor to provide an opportunity to mingle with our neighbours. It is truly a Singaporean memory to be living in a HDB flat.
Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

"The Last of the Free Seas"

"The Last of the Free Seas" | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it

"The Last of the Free Seas is the title of this fantastic map of the Great Lakes made by Boris Artzbasheff.  It was published in Fortune Magazine in July 1940."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 14, 2017 5:23 PM

The inland waterways were absolutely critical to the demographic and economic development of the eastern part of the United States, especially from 1820-1940.  Before World War II, Great Lakes shipping exceeded the tonnage of U.S. Pacific Coast shipping (see hi-res map here). World War II and the beginning of the Cold War led to a consolidation of naval power for the United States and its allies, greatly expanding Pacific shipping trade and spurring fast-developing economies countries. 

 

Great Lakes shipping dramatically declined, in part because steel production has gone to lower-cost producers that were connected to the U.S. economy through the expanded trade.  Some could see irony since the steel warships created from the Great Lakes manufacturing enabled expanded Pacific and Atlantic trade that led to the decline of Great Lakes manufacturing and regional struggles in the rust belt.  Still, more than 200 million tons of cargo, mostly iron ore, coal, and grain, travel across the Great Lakes annually.

 

This deindustrialization clearly is a huge economic negative but the environmental impacts for lakeside communities has been enormous.  Industrial emissions in the watershed and shipping pollution in the lakes went down as waterfowl populations returned and more waterfront property became swimmable again.  Still this map of the environmental stress on the Great Lakes shows they are far from pristine.    

 

Tagsenvironment, historicalwater, resources, transportation, industry, economicregions, globalization.

 

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, August 8, 2017 9:08 PM
Share your insight
Scooped by Lindley Amarantos
Scoop.it!

When Malls Saved the Suburbs From Despair

When Malls Saved the Suburbs From Despair | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
Like it or not, the middle class became global citizens through consumerism—and they did so at the mall.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lindley Amarantos
Scoop.it!

'Hungry Planet: What The World Eats'

'Hungry Planet: What The World Eats' | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
The authors of a new book, Hungry Planet, set out to see how families in 24 regions feed themselves each week. They wanted to see how globalization, migration and other factors affected the diets of communities around the world.
Lindley Amarantos's insight:
AG article #1
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lindley Amarantos
Scoop.it!

Why Where You Live Matters

Why Where You Live Matters | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
When you woke up this morning, were you in a house, an apartment, or a condo? Look around you. What kinds of buildings do you see? Skyscrapers, mid-rise office parks, strip malls, tracts of suburban homes, fields or water? When you went to work, did you drive, bike, take a train, or walk? When you go to buy food, how far do you go, and how do you get there? Where do you go to get a drink?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lindley Amarantos
Scoop.it!

Cities turn to ‘missing middle’ housing to keep older millennials from leaving

Cities turn to ‘missing middle’ housing to keep older millennials from leaving | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
Duplexes, triplexes and smaller buildings can provide affordable alternatives to moving to suburbs, planners say.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Singapore passport becomes 'most powerful' in the world

Singapore passport becomes 'most powerful' in the world | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it

Historically, the top ten most powerful passports in the world were mostly European, with Germany having the lead for the past two years. Since early 2017, Singapore has tied for number one position with Germany. For the first time ever an Asian country has the most powerful passport in the world. It is a testament of Singapore's inclusive diplomatic relations and effective foreign policy."

 

Tag: Singapore, SouthEastAsia, political, development.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Christina Caruso's curator insight, April 28, 2:29 PM
Most powerful passports in the world were mostly European, with Germany having the lead for the past two years. In early of last year, Singapore tied for number one position with Germany. The first time an Asian country has the most powerful passport in the world. Singapore and Germany is tied for the number one position for the most powerful passport.  
tyrone perry's curator insight, May 1, 12:31 PM
Travel is a leisure that has time constraints for most people.  Being able to just up and go is a great luxury.  So for Singapore to have the best passport is great.  This allows the traveler to go from country to country without obtaining visa and its lengthy process of waiting and or just to get a quick visa from certain countries.  The more countries that trust the visiting passport background checks the more passes one can visit.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, May 2, 11:54 PM
(Southeast Asia) I never thought about passports having different restrictions for different countries, let alone that it could be a measure of a country's power and greatness. Formerly tied with Germany, Singapore managed to scrape off another visa requirement from Paraguay, bringing Singapore's visa-free score to 159. The city-state, a major global commerce center, has become the first Asian nation to have the most useful passport. Visa-free requirements reflect a country's ability to negotiate foreign relations. While the country is poor in land size and resources, Singapore excels in their economy and statecraft.
Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

When Climate Change Meets Sprawl: Why Houston's ‘Once-In-A-Lifetime' Floods Keep Happening

When Climate Change Meets Sprawl: Why Houston's ‘Once-In-A-Lifetime' Floods Keep Happening | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it

"Unchecked development remains a priority in the famously un-zoned city, creating short-term economic gains for some, but long term flood risk for everyone."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:56 PM

Houston's development boom and reduction of wetlands leave region prone to more severe flooding.  Here is a great map of the change in impervious surfaces in the region from 1940 to 2017--when you combine that with record-breaking rainfall the results are catastrophic.  But a local understanding of place is critical and this viral post--Things non-Houstonians Need to Understand--is pretty good.     

 

Tagsphysical, fluvialwatercoastal, urban, planningtransportation, architecture.

Tiffany Cooper's curator insight, September 26, 2017 11:11 AM
#geo130
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, October 31, 2017 1:27 PM

Un dossier sur les inondations à Houston (en anglais). La présentation est très originale.

Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How a Texas grocery chain kept running after Hurricane Harvey

How a Texas grocery chain kept running after Hurricane Harvey | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it

"One of my stores, we had 300 employees; 140 of them were displaced by the flooding. So how do you put your store back together quickly? We asked for volunteers in the rest of the company. We brought over 2,000 partners from Austin, San Antonio, the Rio Grande Valley. They hopped into cars and they just drove to Houston. They said, we're here to help. For 18 hours a day, they’re going to help us restock and then they'll go sleep on the couch at somebody's house."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 5, 2017 4:09 PM

Natural disasters complicate the logistics that make our modern economy run.  We take these flows for granted--until they are disrupted. This article is a excellent view into how to operate when disaster strikes. 

 

Tagseconomicindustry, laborglobalizationplace, transportation.

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:55 PM

Natural disasters complicate the logistics that make our modern economy run.  We take these flows for granted--until they are disrupted. This article is a excellent view into how to operate when disaster strikes. 

 

Tagseconomicindustry, laborglobalizationplace, transportation.

Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The World Bank is eliminating the term “developing country” from its data vocabulary

The World Bank is eliminating the term “developing country” from its data vocabulary | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it

"In the 2016 edition of its World Development Indicators, the World Bank has made a big choice: It’s no longer distinguishing between 'developed' countries and “developing” ones in the presentation of its data. The change marks an evolution in thinking about the geographic distribution of poverty and prosperity. But it sounds less radical when you consider that nobody has ever agreed on a definition for these terms in the first place. The International Monetary Fund says its own distinction between advanced and emerging market economies “is not based on strict criteria, economic or otherwise.” The United Nations doesn’t have an official definition of a developing country, despite slapping the label on 159 nations. And the World Bank itself had previously simply lumped countries in the bottom two-thirds of gross national income (GNI) into the category, but even that comparatively strict cut-off wasn’t very useful."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2017 1:38 PM

Labels and categories are so often problematic, but they are also necessary to make sense of the vast amount of information.  Regional geography is inherently about lumping places together that have commonalities, but acknowledging that many differences from place to place makes the world infinitely varied and complex.  Since we can’t process an infinite amount of complexity, we categorize, for better or for worse.  In education, we are continually trying to show how some categorizations fail, hoping that our students will categorize the information they receive in better ways (non-racist ways for example).  The regional terms we use--Latin America, the Middle East, Europe, etc.—impacts how we think about the world.  Each of those terms highlights a few similarities and ignores some important differences.  The terms More Developed Countries (MDCs), Newly Industrialized Countries (NICs), and Less Developed (LDCs) is how many people have socioeconomically categorized the world’s countries, some preferring developing countries instead of LDCs because it less stigmatizing.  In 2015, many at the World Bank have thought that the term “Developing Countries” obscures more than it reveals.  In 2016, the World Bank removed the term from its database since there are more differences than similarities in the economic structures and trajectories of developing countries.         

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some of the major problems that you see with the term developing country?  Even with its problems, what utility is there in the term?  Will you keep using the term or will you abandon it?  How come? 

 

Tagsdevelopment, statistics, economicindustry.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 2017 3:06 AM

Global challenges: Development

James Piccolino's curator insight, February 8, 6:51 AM
I agree that it is important to categorize in order to learn and group things together. I understand some of the implications but it is nonetheless important to the way we learn about other areas. To do away with all labels of this kind will not make the topic and world view more inclusive, but instead make things so complicated that people will either not understand it or not bother with it's complexities. Things need to be distinguished between qualities and traits in order for proper analysis. 
Scooped by Lindley Amarantos
Scoop.it!

Can Anything Stop Rural Decline?

Can Anything Stop Rural Decline? | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
Small towns across Japan are on the verge of collapse. Whether they can do so gracefully has consequences for societies around the globe.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

In the Same Ballpark

In the Same Ballpark | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it

"In 1992, the Baltimore Orioles opened their baseball season at a brand new stadium called Oriole Park at Camden Yards, right along the downtown harbor. The stadium was small and intimate, built with brick and iron trusses—a throwback to the classic ballparks from the early 20th century. It was popular right from the start.

These new Populous ballparks are small and old fashioned-looking but they also feature modern amenities—comfortable seats and fancy foods. And while designed to be different, they tend to follow a similar aesthetic format, featuring a lot red brick and green-painted iron. These new parks also feature asymmetrical playing fields, which are in many cases dictated by the surrounding cityscape."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2017 5:08 PM

This podcast is filled with important urban geographic issues: downtown revitalization, landscape aesthetics, sense of place, planning, public/private revitalization, etc.  And to boot, this podcast uses America's pasttime to discuss these topics. I typically really enjoy the thoughtful exploration of the untold stories that make up our world found in the 99 Percent Invisible podcast.

Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Jordanian parliament repeals rape law

Jordanian parliament repeals rape law | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it

"The Jordanian parliament voted on Tuesday to abolish a provision in the penal code that allows rapists to escape punishment if they marry their victims - a move that is being hailed as 'historic' by activists and locals. Article 308 permit[ed] pardoning rape perpetrators if they marry their victims and stay with them for at least three years.  The controversial provision has for decades divided Jordan between those who believe the law is necessary to protect women's 'honour', and others who see it as a violation of basic human rights."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Treathyl Fox's curator insight, August 3, 2017 9:57 AM
This is major for womens' rights.
David G Tibbs's curator insight, March 22, 12:54 PM
It's amazing how these laws can even exist in today's global society. The law itself is a violation of human rights by making someone who is harmed to before attached to the person that harmed them. It's also shocking some of the countries that have abolished similar laws only within the last 30 years. Countries like Italy, Romania, France, and Peru to name a few. This is not just a continuing issue in the middle east but also in areas in Latin America and in Asia. Hopefully, countries will follow suit, which will take a major change in culture and thought. It will also take a major amount of energy from the people in those countries to change these laws.
 
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, March 27, 11:39 AM
The original reason that this law was put into practice was the most interesting part of the article.  The law stated that men who raped women would not be punished if they married their victim.  It was said that the law protected women from the stigma surrounding rape, especially if they became pregnant.  It’s hard to tell if lawmakers were genuinely concerned with women’s well-beings or if they were just looking for a way to prevent men from being punished and just disguising it as beneficial to women.  The law was in place for about 60 years and was approved to repeal by a very slim majority.  This is a step in making Jordan a more progressive country that respects human rights, however they are still far from having gender equality.  It was upsetting to me that I had never heard of this law before it was introduced to me in class because it shows that the U.S. and media don’t pay attention to such violations of human rights.  It was also crazy to me that it took until 2017 for the law to be repealed, but even more shocking that it was put into place just 60 years ago.  If I didn’t know the history of it, I would have assumed it was some ancient law.
Rescooped by Lindley Amarantos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The path of the solar eclipse is already altering real-world behavior

The path of the solar eclipse is already altering real-world behavior | Mrs. Amarantos' Geography Class | Scoop.it
The highly anticipated event is casting a long shadow online.

 

The upcoming solar eclipse is poised to become the “most photographed, most shared, most tweeted event in human history,” in the words of one astronomer. Millions of people will watch it, potentially overwhelming the cities and towns along the eclipse's path of totality.

According to Google, interest in the eclipse has exploded nationwide in the past few months, mirroring national media attention. The county-level search data above, provided by Google, paints a striking picture: Interest in the eclipse is concentrated in the path of totality that cuts through the middle of the country, receding sharply the farther you go from that path.

 

Tags: Sun, space, media. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.