Motivational Leadership
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Rescooped by Graeme Reid from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Three Ways To Reframe A Problem To Find An Innovative Solution

Three Ways To Reframe A Problem To Find An Innovative Solution | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

Reframing a problem helps you see it as an opportunity, and Seelig offers three techniques for finding innovative solutions:

1. Rethink The Question

Start by questioning the question you’re asking in the first place, says Seelig. "Your answer is baked into your question," she says.

Before you start brainstorming, Seelig suggests you start "frame-storming": brainstorming around the question you will pose to find solutions. For example, if you’re asking, "How should we plan a birthday party for David?" you’re assuming it’s a party. If you change your question to, "How can we make David’s day memorable?" or "How can we make David’s day special?" you will find different sets of solutions.

 


Via The Learning Factor
Graeme Reid's insight:

Reframing an issue from different angles opens up new possibilities and solutions.

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Maggie Lawlor's curator insight, September 11, 2015 2:45 AM

To really make this work, add a dose of people who DON'T think like you - those you regularly disagree with, or wonder what planet they are on.  The follow these three techniques and stay open to all the ideas generated.

Ian Harris's curator insight, October 10, 2015 1:50 AM

Brain fodder!

Nancy Barnett's curator insight, October 14, 2015 10:36 AM

I love this idea about "frame-storming". The answers we get do depend on the way we ask the question. 

Rescooped by Graeme Reid from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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What The Happiest People Know About Work

What The Happiest People Know About Work | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

Study, work hard, and you will be successful.

 

This was the mantra repeated by educators throughout my youth. None of them added "be happy" to the success equation.

 

But a growing body of research in positive psychology and neuroscience is demonstrating that happiness is the secret ingredient to success. It turns out, our brains are more engaged, creative, productive, and resilient when in a positive state.

 

All this unhappiness comes with a high price tag to businesses, costing more than $550 billion a year in lost productivity. In his book, Donovan identifies 60 simple steps individuals can take to improve their happiness and get back on the path to success. Here are six of the top things happy workers do:

 


Via The Learning Factor
Graeme Reid's insight:

If you don't enjoy what you do it is very difficult to be successful.  There are ways to re-frame the way that you look at things to help you focus on what is important to you.

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Jill Miller, SPHR's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:23 AM

The secret sauce for success? Finding happiness in our work -- even simple things -- makes a difference.

Denise Gabbard's curator insight, April 10, 2014 1:19 PM

Doing what you love can make you happy-- finding a way to make money while doing what you love is even better! 

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 22, 2014 11:01 PM

Avoiding energy sappers is what led me to retire from teaching. It was not the students and parents. It was the bureaucratic and technocratic nonsense that went on in school which passes itself off as education.

Rescooped by Graeme Reid from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Performance Management: We Won’t Fix the Problem by Ignoring It

Performance Management: We Won’t Fix the Problem by Ignoring It | Motivational Leadership | Scoop.it

To meet this goal, a performance management system must provide some way to determine how employees are performing relative to their co-workers. Yet there is currently a trend in HR to “fix” performance management by eliminating the use of methods that compare employees based on performance.


This makes no sense since this is the very thing senior business leaders want from performance management!

The 2 performance management methods:
Via The Learning Factor
Graeme Reid's insight:

If we want to fix performance management, we must create methods that accurately classify employees based on past performance in a way that maximizes their future performance and retention.  Rating employees to fit a bell-curve distribution is nonsensical, but identifying your top 10% of performers makes a lot of sense.

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 5, 2014 7:49 PM

When I ask business leaders in large companies what they want from performance management systems, the answer usually includes “identify the top performers in the company.”

Ian Berry's curator insight, August 7, 2014 1:47 AM

Performance management like people management is dead. The question to ask of all performance systems Does our system inspire and make it simple for people to bring their best to their work? Any answer other than a resounding yes means system must be improved.