Mediation and Motivation
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Leadership Develops When You Escape Your Comfort Zone

Leadership Develops When You Escape Your Comfort Zone | Mediation and Motivation | Scoop.it

Successful leaders know that they must get out of their comfort zone to succeed. These leaders have spent a lot of time outside their comfort zone.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Pete's insight:

Successful leaders know that they must get out of their comfort zone to succeed. Great leaders from history are those who have spent a large amount of their time outside their comfort zone.

Leaders who take responsible risks and step into their learning zone are those that succeed. It’s only when you can give up what’s safe and familiar that you create opportunities and develop new capabilities. As you do, you expand your influence and gain the skills required to take on bigger and bigger challenges.

In this sense, leaders are self-made and not born, they are developed, not promoted. Leadership is a learned skill that is developed as you step out of your comfort zone.

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DigitalOyster's curator insight, August 4, 2015 11:57 AM

Leadership begins at the end of your comfort zone. Leadership starts in the learning zone. History has shown that life rewards the risk-takers, such as Thomas Edison, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Nelson Mandela, Henry Ford, Elon Musk, and many, many more. These are leaders who have dared to step out their comfort zone.

 

Leaders who dared to change things.Leaders who dared to make a difference.Leaders who dared to make an impact on the world.

 

Where do you find the line is for your. Is it easier to stay in the comfort zone? Do you try to step out into doing things different but then jump back into comfort? Are you someone who pushes the comfort and see how far you can go?

 

My advice is just try, see if you can get out of your comfort. All I ask is take one more moment and stay with that stretching and growing opportunity and just take 1 more breath. 1 breath, if you an make it through 1 breath then you have gone farther than what you would have without it.

 

Here's to you and your business's brilliance (and one more breath!),

-Mellissa Rempfer

 

Boutara Nour Eddine's curator insight, August 10, 2015 12:04 PM

Leadership begins at the end of your comfort zone. Leadership starts in the learning zone. History has shown that life rewards the risk-takers, such as Thomas Edison, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Nelson Mandela, Henry Ford, Elon Musk, and many, many more. These are leaders who have dared to step out their comfort zone.

 

Leaders who dared to change things.Leaders who dared to make a difference.Leaders who dared to make an impact on the world.

 

 

Shannon Terry's curator insight, March 3, 2016 4:52 PM

Leadership begins at the end of your comfort zone. Leadership starts in the learning zone. History has shown that life rewards the risk-takers, such as Thomas Edison, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Nelson Mandela, Henry Ford, Elon Musk, and many, many more. These are leaders who have dared to step out their comfort zone.

 

  • Leaders who dared to change things.
  • Leaders who dared to make a difference.
  • Leaders who dared to make an impact on the world.

 

 

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THE ROLE OF EMPATHY IN CRIME, POLICING, AND JUSTICE

THE ROLE OF EMPATHY IN CRIME, POLICING, AND JUSTICE | Mediation and Motivation | Scoop.it

How Empathy Matters


My associates and I have reviewed recent research and done some additional analyses to pin down what is currently known about empathy – and perceptions of empathy – in the realm of crime and justice. When other factors, like age, sex, race, education, and income are taken into account, empathy turns out to matter in several ways:


Empathetic people are less likely to engage in delinquency or crime.

But those who have trouble perceiving how others feel, and have difficulty sharing those feelings, are more likely to engage in wrongful acts – everything from minor juvenile delinquency to the most serious of violent crimes. 


Empathy affects how people think about crime and punishment in complex ways.

People capable of empathy tend to support tough punishments for crime, but at the same time they are less likely to call for the harshest punishments, such as the death penalty.


Empathy and perceptions of empathy help to shape the interactions of police and members of the communities they are assigned to protect.

Research on citizen interactions with the police has consistently indicated that the way officers behave determines how they are evaluated by people with whom they interact. When we probe in detail, it turns out community members have more positive evaluations of the police when officers communicate that they understand the issues that matter to community members. Studies specifically show that the police are more likely to be trusted and considered effective at their jobs when they display empathy with the community’s concerns. 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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The freedom found in restorative justice: The John Lash story

The freedom found in restorative justice: The John Lash story | Mediation and Motivation | Scoop.it


Two things contributed to John Lash’s purpose in life as a counselor: his time in prison and restorative justice.  

John Lash was born in Louisiana and grew up in Valdosta, Ga. His troubled youth led to his incarceration. He had spent almost 25 years in prison after being arrested at the age of 18. Lash was introduced to the practice of Buddhism, non-violent communication and restorative justice while in prison and quickly latched onto them.  

“I was a very angry young man, which directly played into my crime,” said Lash. “The changes I made through mindfulness practice were a lot about recognizing how my own story and what is going on in the world often doesn't match up with reality.”

Lash learned about the impact that language has in the internal world and its impact on others. He found solace in these practices and felt a need to share them with the other inmates, teaching them the non-violent skills that he was learning. In December 2009, Lash was released from prison. Upon his release, he wanted to complete his education in a field that utilized non-violent communication as well as restorative justice. Lash pursued a bachelor’s degree from Mercer University and a master’s degree in conflict management from Kennesaw State University.

 After some time, Lash decided to move to Athens, Ga. He wanted to bring his expertise and knowledge to his new home, so he Googled “Athens conflict” and stumbled upon the Georgia Conflict Center, where he applied to be an intern for the organization. Lash quickly progressed and became the executive director in 2013, taking over the position from former Athens Mayor Gwen O’Looney, who assumed the role in 2011 from the founder Elizabeth Loescher.

Elizabeth Loescher founded the center in 1987 in Denver, Co. After 15 years of managing the organization, she decided to relocate to Athens to continue aiding in bringing peace to the city. The Georgia Conflict Center has various programs for all ages including the Peacemakers group. This group meets for eight weeks at a time to discuss nonviolent communication skills. The center also offers this group to the Athens Diversion Center, a work release center that houses nonviolent and minimum-security inmates. 

The center mainly focuses on restorative justice, which is a theory of justice that emphasizes repairing the harm caused or revealed by immoral behavior. It focuses on the needs of the victim as well as the offender as an approach to justice. 

 “We are looking to induce an empathetic understanding between the person who has caused harm and the person who they have harmed,” said Lash. “We want to work with people, since they are the experts in their own conflicts. Usually people are trying to fix others or to punish them somehow. ”

Lash counsels many people who battle issues with communication. Annice Ritter was a participant in the recent Peacemakers group and Lash was able to help Ritter overcome a personal issue in her life by seeing the importance of nonviolent communication. 

“In the times we are living in, we need more non-violent communication,” said Ritter.

Nonviolent communication is a conflict-resolution process that has benefits for both parties in a conversation. Self-empathy, empathy for others, and honest self-expression are the three aspects of communication that create harmony among people. The Georgia Conflict Center has volunteer opportunities and encourages university students to get involved to help its members.

“Conflict exists in every aspect of a community - in schools, at work, at home,” said Leslie Jones, University of Georgia student and volunteer. “The Georgia Conflict Center has brought something to Athens that not many communities focus on, but all of them experience it on a daily basis. It provides members of our community with a safe space to explore conflict and discover new strategies of addressing it.”

Lash believes that the Georgia Conflict Center has the ability to make Athens a better place.

  “We empower people to take responsibility for themselves and their conflicts by connecting with their own power of choice and responsibility for their well-being,” said Lash. We also offer support to those in conflict that isn't aimed at ‘fixing’ anyone, but instead seeks to bolster their inherent ability to express and understand meaning in the least intrusive way.”

Looking back on his life, Lash is reminded that prison and restorative justice had a great impact on him and the course of his life. 

“I look at my life and it’s pretty miraculous,” said Lash.


Via Jim Manske
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Employment Mediations – an Insider’s Guide, Part 7 | Employment Law Worldview


Via Richard Boyd
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Richard Boyd's curator insight, August 14, 2014 5:31 AM

Excellent insight into the mechanics of workplace mediation.

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Talking Peace in the Ogaden | Conciliation Resources

Talking Peace in the Ogaden | Conciliation Resources | Mediation and Motivation | Scoop.it
Brief history of ethnic Somalis in Ethiopia and analysis of peace talks between Ethiopian government and ONLF.

Via CoPeSeNetwork
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Mediation Feedback: Who is it For?

Mediation Feedback: Who is it For? | Mediation and Motivation | Scoop.it
This article is the result of switching seats – moving from practitioner to party. Every mediation service I've worked for sends out feedback forms. Sometimes immediately after sessions, sometimes a few weeks later. This experience made me question the importance of mediation evaluation.

Via Richard Boyd
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Reframing Resolution - Managing Conflict and Resolving Individual Employment Disputes in the Contemporary Workplace


Via Richard Boyd
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POLICE MEDIATION

  Significant aspects of police intervention have always included intermediary work in response to requests for assistance in handling conflict situations. While these police interventions are actually similar to those undertaken by mediators, the term ”mediation” has not typically been […]

Via Rob Duke
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Why Some Women Negotiate Better Than Others

Why Some Women Negotiate Better Than Others | Mediation and Motivation | Scoop.it
It starts with understanding how to handle gender and professional identities.

Via Rob Duke
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Employment mediations – an insider’s guide part 2 | Lexology

Employment mediations – an insider’s guide part 2 | Lexology | Mediation and Motivation | Scoop.it
Time in any mediation is often both limited and precious. Once it is underway there is little time for sorting out the preliminaries. As a result, it…

Via Richard Boyd
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Dominic Barter on Compassion: Why It's Time for Restorative Justice

Dominic Barter on Compassion: Why It's Time for Restorative Justice | Mediation and Motivation | Scoop.it
In the wake of recent tragedies, Charles Eisenstein and Dominic Barter explain why restorative justice is the answer. Explore how compassion and empathy lead to healing and reconciliation.

 

"There's something really unique about empathy, that it clears the things that are blocking action, and that it connects both inside and to other people in a way that is transformative." - Dominic Barter

 

With the wave of tragedies hitting the news lately -- Gaza, Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, and countless others -- it feels both relevant and necessary to bring restorative justice into the fold. In the wake of these disasters, Charles Eisenstein (known for Occupy Love and promoting a gift economy) penned apoignant essay on viewing major conflicts through the lens of empathy and compassion.

by Kimberly Bryant


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Advantages and disadvantages of mediation

There's a lot of hot air talked about mediation, so I thought I'd go back to basics and look the Advantages and Disadvantages straight in the eye. Here

Via Richard Boyd
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Why Mediators Don't Give Advice, Suggestions or Opinions

Why Mediators Don't Give Advice, Suggestions or Opinions | Mediation and Motivation | Scoop.it
For some people who come to mediation for the first time, either as a client or as someone wanting to train in mediation skills there can be a sense of surprise when they find out that  Mediators don't give advice, suggestions or opinions. There are many reasons why this is so and I want to outline

Via Richard Boyd
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Mock Mediation – an opportunity to see mediation in action : Current events : EEF

Mock Mediation – an opportunity to see mediation in action : Current events : EEF | Mediation and Motivation | Scoop.it
National trends over the last two years have seen an upsurge in the use of workplace mediation by companies as a means of achieving a speedy and cost-effective resolution of conflicts in the workplace, but do you know what happens in mediation, why it wor...

Via Richard Boyd
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