mortal but healthy
2 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Liliana Sanchez from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Search for Immortality: Google Says Humans Could Live to be 500 Years Old

Search for Immortality: Google Says Humans Could Live to be 500 Years Old | mortal but healthy | Scoop.it

Google has invested in taxi firms, smart thermostats and even artificial intelligence but it is also setting its sights on immortality - or at least increasing our lives five-fold. In an interview with Bloomberg, Google Ventures' president Bill Maris said he thinks it's possible to live to 500 years old. And this will be helped by medical breakthroughs as well as a rise in biomechanics. Bill Maris has $425 million to invest this year, and the freedom to invest it however he wants. He's looking for companies that will slow aging, reverse disease, and extend life.


He has already sank money into genetics firms and cancer diagnostic startups and said: 'We have the tools in the life sciences to achieve anything that you have the audacity to envision. I just hope to live long enough not to die.' Mr Maris has advised Aurolab in the development of a hydrophobic acrylic lens for cataract blindness, and helped develop Google’s Calico project.


Calico is a research and development company set up in 2013 by Google and Apple to tackle 'aging and associated diseases.'


Google co-founder Larry Page said the project would focus on 'health, wellbeing and longevity' and last September Calico partnered with AbbVie to open a research centre into neurodegeneration and cancer. Although these firms are focused on extending life naturally, there is also a group that believes machines will be the key to extending lives beyond 120 - an age that has been quoted as the 'real absolute limit to human lifespan'.


Maris has a team of 70, most of whom are in the room this day or patched in by phone or video. The group includes the fund’s 17 investing partners, who are in charge of finding startups. Among the investing partners are Joe Kraus, co-founder of Excite; Rich Miner, co-founder of Android; and David Krane, employee No. 84 at Google.


The mood in the room is casual. Some staffers sit cross-legged on the floor; others curl up on soft felt couches. There are a lot of jokes. One partner starts his presentation with a slide entitled “Secret Project”—which most people in the room already know about—and concludes it with a doctored-up photo of Maris’s head superimposed on the body of someone playing tambourine. It’s a jab at the boss, who married the singer-songwriterTristan Prettyman last August and recently went on tour with her. Everyone laughs. Maris smiles, but immediately he’s back to business. “Time is the one thing I can’t get back and can’t give back to you,” he says, turning to an agenda on the screen behind him.


“I know you’re all aware of the conference happening this week,” Maris says. An hour away in San Francisco, JPMorgan Chase is hosting its annual health-care confab, nicknamed the Super Bowl of Health Care.


Thousands of pharmaceutical executives and investors have gathered for what has become a huge part of the industry’s dealmaking. Most of Google Ventures’ life sciences startups are attending. One,Foundation Medicine, which uses genetic data to create diagnostic oncology tools, is generating huge buzz this year. In January, Roche Holding announced plans to take a majority stake in the company, in a transaction valued at $1 billion. The stock more than doubled the next day. Google Ventures has a 4 percent stake in the company.


For Maris, Foundation Medicine represents the beginning of a revolution. “The analogy I use is this,” he says, holding up his iPhone 6. “Even five years ago, this would have been unimaginable. Twenty years ago, you wouldn’t have been able to talk to anyone on this.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Liliana Sanchez from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

'Expansion entropy': A new litmus test for chaos?

'Expansion entropy': A new litmus test for chaos? | mortal but healthy | Scoop.it
Can the flap of a butterfly's wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas? This intriguing hypothetical scenario, commonly called "the butterfly effect," has come to embody the popular conception of a chaotic system, in which a small difference in initial conditions will cascade toward a vastly different outcome in the future.

 

Understanding and modeling chaos can help address a variety of scientific and engineering questions, and so researchers have worked to develop better mathematical definitions of chaos. These definitions, in turn, will aid the construction of models that more accurately represent real-world chaotic systems.


Now, researchers from the University of Maryland have described a new definition of chaos that applies more broadly than previous definitions. This new definition is compact, can be easily approximated by numerical methods and works for a wide variety of chaotic systems. The discovery could one day help advance computer modeling across a wide variety of disciplines, from medicine to meteorology and beyond. The researchers present their new definition in the July 28, 2015 issue of the journal Chaos.


"Our definition of chaos identifies chaotic behavior even when it lurks in the dark corners of a model," said Brian Hunt, a professor of mathematics with a joint appointment in the Institute for Physical Science and Technology (IPST) at UMD. Hunt co-authored the paper with Edward Ott, a Distinguished University Professor of Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering with a joint appointment in the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (IREAP) at UMD.


The study of chaos is relatively young. MIT meteorologist Edward Lorenz, whose work gave rise to the term "the butterfly effect," first noticed chaotic characteristics in weather models in the mid-20th century. In 1963, he published a set of differential equations to describe atmospheric airflow and noted that tiny variations in initial conditions could drastically alter the solution to the equations over time, making it difficult to predict the weather in the long term.


Mathematically, extreme sensitivity to initial conditions can be represented by a quantity called a Lyapunov exponent. This number is positive if two infinitesimally close starting points diverge exponentially as time progresses. Yet, Lyapunov exponents have limitations as a definition of chaos: they only test for chaos in particular solutions of a model, not in the model itself, and they can be positive even when the underlying model is considered too straightforward to be deemed chaotic.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Liliana Sanchez
Scoop.it!

Umberto Eco’s Advice to Writers

Umberto Eco’s Advice to Writers | mortal but healthy | Scoop.it

“If we think that our reader is an idiot, we should not use rhetorical figures, but if we use them and feel the need to explain them, we are essentially calling the reader an idiot.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Liliana Sanchez
Scoop.it!

6 Ways to Filter the Internet and find Valuable Content

Content is King! Content is also EVERYWHERE... In your face with emails.. In your social streams, sponsored updates, every new app claims to be a "news feed but nobody has the time needed to read and sort through EVERY blog post! So why not use automation and dynamic apps to filter the internet based on your preferences allowing you to be more productive and read the stuff that is important to you and share that with your community! That is my focus and here are 6 of the tools I use to do this!

more...
Ally Greer's curator insight, July 22, 2014 6:34 PM

Great tips & tools from Scoopiteer @Brian Fanzo!

Julia Echeverría's curator insight, July 31, 2014 6:54 AM

Este artículo es realmente interesante, qué sería de nosotros sin la curación de contenidos?, si es lo que realmente importa en la red.

Scooped by Liliana Sanchez
Scoop.it!

Learning to love our bodies | Eva Wiseman

Learning to love our bodies | Eva Wiseman | mortal but healthy | Scoop.it

A young woman dies taking diet pills; girls as young as eight are dissatisfied with their bodies... How raising awareness around obesity is triggering eating disorders I’m trying to remember how I felt about my body when I was eight.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Liliana Sanchez from Content marketing automation
Scoop.it!

Third-party content is 4x to 7x more trusted than your own

Third-party content is 4x to 7x more trusted than your own | mortal but healthy | Scoop.it

I had always believed that most of the marketing content used by a company should be developed internally (...). Because of three recent research studies, I now have a different view on this issue.


Via Guillaume Decugis
more...
Ken Dickens's curator insight, August 29, 2014 3:50 PM

Data in support of Content Curation as a must-do website/marketing strategy for all.  In fact, you are reading Curated Content now!  -Ken

 

www.2080nonprofits.org

Biomagnetips's curator insight, December 11, 2014 7:38 AM

Interesting statistics released from the CMO Council.

 

Janet Fouts's curator insight, February 3, 2015 1:52 PM

It's no surprise really that people trust external content from bloggers and journalists to what you write in your marketing spiels. That's why curation works so well. You can bring in voices who share the same messaging and add credibility to your voice.

Rescooped by Liliana Sanchez from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Scientists have managed to build a fully functional neuron by using organic bioelectronics

Scientists have managed to build a fully functional neuron by using organic bioelectronics | mortal but healthy | Scoop.it

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet have managed to build a fully functional neuron by using organic bioelectronics. This artificial neuron contain no ‘living’ parts, but is capable of mimicking the function of a human nerve cell and communicate in the same way as our own neurons do.


Neurons are isolated from each other and communicate with the help of chemical signals, commonly called neurotransmitters or signal substances. Inside a neuron, these chemical signals are converted to an electrical action potential, which travels along the axon of  the neuron until it reaches the end. Here at the synapse, the electrical signal is converted to the release of chemical signals, which via diffusion can relay the signal to the next nerve cell.


To date, the primary technique for neuronal stimulation in human cells is based on electrical stimulation. However, scientists at the Swedish Medical Nanoscience Centre (SMNC) at Karolinska Institutet's Department of Neuroscience in collaboration with collegues at Linköping University, have now created an organic bioelectronic device that is capable of receiving chemical signals, which it can then relay to human cells.


“Our artificial neuron is made of conductive polymers and it functions like a human neuron”, says lead investigator Agneta Richter-Dahlfors, professor of cellular microbiology. “The sensing component of the artificial neuron senses a change in chemical signals in one dish, and translates this into an electrical signal. This electrical signal is next translated into the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in a second dish, whose effect on living human cells can be monitored.“


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Liliana Sanchez from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

FingerReader: MIT finger device reads to the blind in real time

FingerReader: MIT finger device reads to the blind in real time | mortal but healthy | Scoop.it

Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing an audio reading device to be worn on the index finger of people whose vision is impaired, giving them affordable and immediate access to printed words.

 

The so-called FingerReader, a prototype produced by a 3-D printer, fits like a ring on the user’s finger, equipped with a small camera that scans text. A synthesized voice reads words aloud, quickly translating books, restaurant menus and other needed materials for daily living, especially away from home or office.

 

Reading is as easy as pointing the finger at text. Special software tracks the finger movement, identifies words and processes the information. The device has vibration motors that alert readers when they stray from the script, said Roy Shilkrot, who is developing the device at the MIT Media Lab.

 

For Jerry Berrier, 62, who was born blind, the promise of the FingerReader is its portability and offer of real-time functionality at school, a doctor’s office and restaurants.

 

“When I go to the doctor’s office, there may be forms that I wanna read before I sign them,” Berrier said.

 

He said there are other optical character recognition devices on the market for those with vision impairments, but none that he knows of that will read in real time.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.