Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
15.8K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Richard Platt
onto Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
Scoop.it!

Fujitsu's Gesture Controlled Glove is a Throwback to the 1980s

Fujitsu's Gesture Controlled Glove is a Throwback to the 1980s | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The humble glove isn't exactly a paragon of wearable technological bliss. Aside from the occasional pair that allows you to use touchscreens while in use, there hasn't been much forward motion on tha...
Richard Platt's insight:

Does this remind anyone else of Micheal Jackson's glove like it does me?

more...
No comment yet.
Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

World’s First iPhone Cochlear Implant Sound Processor to Be Presented at Wearable Technology Conference

World’s First iPhone Cochlear Implant Sound Processor to Be Presented at Wearable Technology Conference | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
On December 7 and 8 our first ever WT | Wearable Technologies Conference Australia will be held in Sydney. Besides Kevin White from Collingwood Football Club,
Richard Platt's insight:

With the Nucleus 7 Sound Processor, people with a Cochlear Nucleus implant can stream sound directly from a compatible iPhone, iPad and iPod touch directly to their sound processor. They will also be able to control, monitor and customize their hearing on their iPhone or iPod touch through the Nucleus Smart App available from the Apple App Store.  As the world’s first and only Made for iPhone cochlear implant sound processor, the Nucleus 7 Sound Processor makes listening to music in high-quality stereo sound, watching videos and making FaceTime calls — streamed directly to their cochlear implant — easily accessible for wearers. Importantly, the direct streaming also enhances the experience of talking on the phone – something we know is incredibly important for our customers. It is also the smallest and lightest behind-the-ear cochlear implant sound processor available from Cochlear.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

KardiaBand helps the Apple Watch inch closer to becoming a medical device

KardiaBand helps the Apple Watch inch closer to becoming a medical device | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The line between wearable and the real thing is blurring, as the FDA has approved the KardiaBand as a medical accessory for the Apple Watch.
Richard Platt's insight:

Available for $199, the KardiaBand is just a band that can be used in place of your current Apple Watch wristband. Located immediately below the Apple Watch is a silver sensor, where you can place your finger for a reading. The Apple Watch will then show results using a familiar line graph (it’s much like the one that Apple Watch already uses to show your heart rate data) and inform users if their heart rate is anything out of the ordinary.

The key to the KardiaBand is AliveCor’s SmartRhythm technology, a new feature within the Apple Watch’s Kardia app. SmartRhythm employs artificial intelligence alongside Apple Watch heart rate and activity sensors to “continuously evaluate the correlation between heart activity and physical activity,” the company noted in a release.  “KardiaBand paired with SmartRhythm technology will be life-changing for people who are serious about heart health,” AliceCor CEO Vic Gundotra said in a statement. “These capabilities will allow people to easily and discreetly check their heart rhythms when they may be abnormal, capturing essential information to help doctors identify the issue and inform a clear path of care to help manage AFib, a leading cause of stroke, and other serious conditions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

'Smart' fabric could turn your clothes into wearable keycards

'Smart' fabric could turn your clothes into wearable keycards | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Researchers developed a magnetized fabric that can be programmed with passcodes to unlock doors. The technology could one day replace conventional keys.
Richard Platt's insight:

From keycards to touchpads, scientists have developed all sorts of alternatives to conventional metal keys. Now researchers at the University of Washington have developed a “smart” fabric that they say can be used to create clothing programmed with the wearer’s identity — making it possible to open doors at home and at work with just the swipe of a shirt cuff. “With our approach we can transform everyday clothes like a shirt into a magnetic hard drive that can store codes and images, and which can be thrown into a washer and dryer without any loss of information,” Justin Chan, a Ph.D. student in computer science and engineering at the university and the lead author of a recent study about the new technology, told NBC News MACH in an email.  For the research, Chan and his colleagues used sewing machines and off-the-shelf conductive thread to create magnetizable embroidery. Then, they used a magnet to "program" sections of the embroidery with positive or negative poles to represent the zeros and ones of digital passcodes. These resulting codes can be read by a magnetometer, an inexpensive sensor that detects magnetic fieldsIn one test, the researchers programmed a shirtsleeve patch with the passcode for an electronic door lock. They were able to unlock the door by swiping the cuff in front of an array of magnetometers affixed to the door.  Chan says the technology is a less expensive alternative to conventional keycards, which store passcodes in radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips that use electromagnetic fields to identify people or objects. “RFID readers can cost hundreds of dollars, whereas each magnetometer can retail for under a dollar,” he told MACH. “You can have a much cheaper reader and be able to read information that’s on your clothes.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

A prominent LA hospital is using Fitbits to help patients go home sooner

A prominent LA hospital is using Fitbits to help patients go home sooner | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Patients who reach 1,000 steps a day are typically ready to be discharged sooner than those who don't.
Richard Platt's insight:

Cedars-Sinai hospital is giving out Fitbit activity trackers to its patients after knee replacements, hip replacements and other surgeries, to encourage them to start walking short distances.  For healthy people, 10,000 steps a day is a typical goal. But the doctors at Cedars-Sinai found that patients that reach even 1,000 steps are usually discharged sooner than those who don't.  "Patients need to walk after they've had a surgery," said Brennan Spiegel, director of health services research at Cedars-Sinai, in an interview with CNBC. "There's decades of research, so we know that."  Spiegel is among the medical professionals who started working with Fitbit as the company expanded beyond the consumer market and into research and clinical studies. Fitbit told CNBC in September that it's unfazed by rivals like Apple and Samsung, in part due to the company's focus on health and medical applications.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from Corporate & Employee Wellness Programs
Scoop.it!

Will wearable tech create a two-tier healthcare system?

Will wearable tech create a two-tier healthcare system? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Health-tracking devices are on the rise, but what does it mean for people who can’t afford the technology?

Via Mike Rucker
Richard Platt's insight:

The cost of health

Growing corporate wellness programmes are attempting to combat the estimated £29 billion-a-year cost to UK business, lost because of sickness and absence. BP, for instance, offers discounts on the cost of health plans if their employees walk one million steps a year – verified with a wearable tracking device. Gartner forecasts that, by next year, two million people will be required to wear a fitness tracker by their employers.  Groups such as airline pilots and firefighters are expected to be the first to be targeted, as it’s important these groups get enough sleep and are not overly stressed when doing their jobs. However, when you move outside of these groups to ordinary workers, the use of technology for other forms of tracking becomes apparent.  

But is insurance moving towards the ultimate in personalised risk cover, with those using wearable health technologies able to gain cheaper premiums than those not using this technology?

“I hope not,” comments Hilary Stephenson, managing director of digital user experience agency Sigma. “But if people feel incentivised by it I can see it happening. For example, car insurance companies issue apps to monitor safe driving, which resulted in lower premiums for those who scored highly.

“People choosing to manage their own health and share their data with insurers and GPs because they want to understand positive outcomes is very different to making this use of technology and data sharing mandatory in order to better qualify for a service.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

How to choose a fitness tracker

How to choose a fitness tracker | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
How to choose a fitness tracker: With so many fitness trackers on the market, it is difficult to choose the one that will best fit your needs. The right activity tracker will be based on your individual needs; whether it’s step counting, sleep tracking or 24/7 heart rate tracking, there’s something for everyone.
Richard Platt's insight:

(1) What is your budget? How much money do you want to spend?
(2) What do you want to track? Standard metrics or are you after something more advanced?
(3) Does the design appeal to you? This is a matter of personal taste.
(4) Colour display, black and white display, or no display?
(5) User experience
(6) Keeping it juiced
(7) GPS or no GPS?
(8) Is it water-resistant? Or swim friendly?
(9) Do you want a heart-rate monitor? Heart rate monitors vary greatly too.
(10) Do you want extras such as smart notifications, NFC payments, etc?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

The Devices That Are Making Wearable Tech Invisible

The Devices That Are Making Wearable Tech Invisible | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable tech is becoming invisible, which means people are developing high tech devices that are smaller than ever before. These devices are bringing pervasive
Richard Platt's insight:

Wearable tech is becoming invisible, which means people are developing high tech devices that are smaller than ever before. These devices are bringing pervasive computing closer and closer to reality. This includes placing microprocessors into any object that can be worn on the body; such as inside of shoes, T-shirts, a classic watch and even jewelry. Technology is at the shy beginning of holding hands with fashion; however there are a few companies that have products on the market today. Check them out below.

GameTraka is defining the new “shy tech,” meaning that they integrate technology in a way that is blind to the eye. Their product is a GPS device that is placed behind the wearers’ neck – like a kind of bra shape. It was launched in January 2015. GameTraka is aiming to fill a gap in the market for sport players. It is designed and developed for sub-elite athletes and amateur players. GameTraka allows to filter down to grass roots sport level and allow the wearer to track, measure and monitor physical performance based on facts.   

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Pay for Moscow public transport with a tap of your ring

With the same functionalities of the Troika card, the company behind the 'payring' say it will make commuting faster and simpler.
Richard Platt's insight:

The ‘Payring’ gives users the same functionalities of the Troika card, which lets people pay for their ride with a tap, similar to London’s Oyster card. The new ring will work on the metro, train and bus systems throughout the Russian capital city.

Moscow will be the first metro system in the world to use the technology and the result of the company’s tests show that the use of the rings could speed up the flow of passengers to and from the underground stations.  In February this year, the first metro rings were awarded as a prize for a competition for couples on Valentine’s Day but it’s expected they’ll be available for widespread purchase from the end of this month. Commuters can pick them up from the Moscow metro’s souvenir shops or at kiosks dotted around the city’s stations. The cost of the ring has not been announced yet.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wearable devices pack outsize safety punch for Insurance Industry

Wearable devices pack outsize safety punch for Insurance Industry | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable technology has advanced from simply storing data to helping prevent or reduce workplace accidents, and can provide employers and insurers with invaluable information, industry analysts say.
Richard Platt's insight:

David Roy, second vice president for Travelers Cos. Inc.’s Forensic Engineering Laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut, said the marketplace for wearable technology is predicted to reach $34 billion by 2020.   Keying on the safety issue, Mr. Roy said there are 35,000 “struck-by” accidents per year in the United States in construction and manufacturing, resulting in 200 fatalities a year.  “So imagine that little device on your wrist would talk to that fork truck or that fork truck driver, and perhaps prevent that injury,” Mr. Roy said. “It’s coming, it’s here.”   Mr. Roy noted that the shrinking size of technology is a large factor in the growth of wearables adoption, adding that “your phone has more computing power than NASA’s first space explorations.”

Thomas Ryan, senior principal and director of workers compensation research at Willis Towers Watson P.L.C. in New York, said data obtained from wearables is a huge topic for many risk managers, employers and workers comp coordinators. 

“A big area we’ve seen is predictive analytics,” Mr. Ryan said, “they love to see some way in which predictive analytics can be implemented to evaluate a safe work environment.”   Mr. Ryan said wearables are also being used to encourage employees to adopt a healthier life style, such as tracking how much they walk.

With so many uses, the devices are sometimes subject to overlapping regulations, an attorney on the panel said.

“Is it a clinical device, is it a leisure device, or is it a safety device?” said Miki Kolton, of counsel with the law firm Greenberg Traurig L.L.P. in Washington. “Because you have different definitions based upon the regulatory authority that you’re talking about.” 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

NIIST team fabricates a wearable antenna

NIIST team fabricates a wearable antenna | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The prototype made may need more improvements
Richard Platt's insight:

Wearable antenna embedded in a multilayered polyester fabric suitable for WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) applications may soon become a reality, thanks to the work by researchers at the National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (CSIR-NIIST), Thiruvananthapuram. The wearable WiMAX antenna, which is about 3 cm in length and nearly 4 cm in width, is flexible, light weight and operates at around 3.37 GHertz. Wearable antenna has applications in telemedicine, defence and environmental monitoring, among others.    “Our goal is to make wearable antenna which can be embedded in the jacket worn by soldiers in remote locations. We can connect the antenna to different sensors such as temperature, pressure and ECG sensors and the data can be transmitted to a remote server. The antenna can sense and communicate data in a non-intrusive manner. This way we can monitor the health of soldiers,” says Dr. P. Mohanan from Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi and one of the authors of the paper. Silver choice:  Conventionally, thin copper films cladded to glass reinforced epoxy substrates are used for making patch antennas and these antennas are not flexible.

The antenna fabrication can be dramatically simplified by printing technology using copper ink where the radiating patch as well as bottom electrode can be screen printed onto flexible substrates including fabrics. But the use of copper ink is fraught with problems as it gets oxidized easily thus compromising the performance of the antenna.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Disney and Garmin gamify exercise with Vívofit Jr. 2 wearable for kids

Disney and Garmin gamify exercise with Vívofit Jr. 2 wearable for kids | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Mobile Marketer
Richard Platt's insight:

Insight:

Companies like Garmin, FitBit and Apple have introduced wearable products like activity trackers and watches that aim to help people be more aware of their activities and encourage more physical activity. Garmin introduced its first Vívofit Jr. for children last year. The kid-centered devices are smaller versions of the company's Vívofit fitness tracker for adults.

In the Vívofit Jr. Garmin and Disney are combining physical activity with mobile tech by gamifying exercise and making it more fun for kids and easily trackable for busy parents. This is just the latest example of brands leveraging wearable tech to bridge digital and offline worlds, while also likely driving app installs and mobile engagement for the brands among both kids and parents. 

 

The global market for wearable technology is poised to grow about 17% this year worldwide, according to a Gartner study cited by TechCrunch. The researcher forecasts global sales of 310.4 million wearable devices this year with $30.5 billion in sales. About $9.3 billion of that amount will likely be for smartwatches, such as the Apple Watch and Samsung’s Gear watch.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

A list of everything Magic Leap has released so far

A list of everything Magic Leap has released so far | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Things released by Magic Leap, a company which has raised $1.4B from investors, to date: A patent for some chill looking glasses Rumors of a new..
Richard Platt's insight:

Things released by Magic Leap, a company which has raised $1.4B from investors, to date:

Magic Leap has been very, very willing to talk endlessly about its unreleased product without actually saying anything. We eagerly await the payoff for the above list.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Pay for your coffee with this analogue Timex

Pay for your coffee with this analogue Timex | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
It has bPay in the straps, and won't break the bank
Richard Platt's insight:

Timex has just announced an analogue watch with a contactless payment strap, letting you pay for coffees, shopping, and the underground with a tap of the wrist.    The technology has been added to Timex's most popular styles, the Fairfield Chronograph. 

The payment smarts come from bPay, enabling you to make purchases of £30 (or under).   You'll also be able to track their spending, top up their balance, and take control of their contactless payments using the dedicated bPay app or website.

“We are thrilled to be launching our newest innovation in wearable technology and partnering with bPay,” said Duncan Harris, TIMEX UK Sales & Marketing Director.   “The functionality of the Fairfield Contactless watch gives our consumer the option of hands free payment, whilst retaining the timeless character of this classic chronograph watch. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

The Fitbit Ionic’s first major update adds new apps and watchfaces

The Fitbit Ionic’s first major update adds new apps and watchfaces | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Finally, a Flipboard Fitbit app
Richard Platt's insight:

Fitbit is releasing the first major update to the Fitbit OS software on its flagship Ionic smartwatch today, bringing a host of new apps and watchfaces to the fledging smartwatch platform.

Leading the charge are 14 new apps from major companies that have been designed specifically for Fitbit’s platform: Surfline, Clue, Game Golf, Hue Lights, Walgreens, Nest, Yelp, Flipboard, The New York Times, TripAdvisor, Uber, United Airlines, British Airways, and Lyft. Some of those apps (like The New York Times, Yelp, and Hue Lights) will be available starting today, but the majority are slated as coming “before the end of the year” or in January.  Fitbit has also designed three new watchfaces for the Ionic that are bundled with the new update: levels, threads, and mountainscape.  Additionally, there’s a new Fitbit Leaderboard app, which lets users compare their fitness stats against friends and family directly from the Ionic.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

285 Million Hearable Devices On The Way

285 Million Hearable Devices On The Way | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
285 Million Hearable Devices On The Way - 11/28/2017
Richard Platt's insight:
 

Part of the wearables market is morphing into a hearables market.  Ever since Apple, Google and more smartphone makers started ditching the audio jack in a move to wireless audio, the market for wireless hearing devices has taken off.  Within five years, there will be 285 million hearables in use, a growth rate of 46% a year, according to a new forecast from Juniper Research.  The research firm defines a hearable as ‘an ear-based wearable device that supplies aural content or information to the wearer that is either generated by computations and data on the device itself or by an attached app.’  There are six stages of a given market, with hearables pretty much in the middle. Here’s how Juniper defines the six stages:

  1. Early stages of development, but offering significant potential
  2. Gaining traction, but not yet fulfilled potential
  3. Established technologies delivering good revenue and still evolving
  4. Technology and business cases are established
  5. Initial markets saturated, expansion needed
  6. Total market saturation, unit sales based almost entirely on product refreshes across all markets

Hearables are considered to be at the third phase, delivering revenue while still evolving. For context, the overall Bluetooth headset market is considered to be at the fifth phase.

Most (70%) of the market is projected to be concentrated in North America and Europe.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Patent troll that sued over Apple Watch and 80 other fitness products meets its match

Patent troll that sued over Apple Watch and 80 other fitness products meets its match | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
CEO defends patent lawsuits: "We will slingshot our IP at all the offenders."
Richard Platt's insight:

A patent troll that has sued more than 80 companies by laying broad claims to Internet-connected "wearables" may be nearing the end of its road.  The patent appeals board at the US Patent and Trademark Office has agreed to reconsider 16 patent claims owned by Sportbrain Holdings, LLC. The Patent Office's decision comes just three days after Sportbrain filed a lawsuit against Apple (PDF). Taking on its highest-profile target yet, Sportbrain claims that the Apple Watch violates US Patent No. 7,454,002, titled "Integrating personal data capturing functionality into a portable computing device and a wireless communication device."  In dozens of lawsuits, Sportbrain's lawyers have argued that its patent entitles it to collect royalties on a huge range of devices and software products that gather user fitness information. Beginning in January 2016, Sportbrain unleashed a torrent of lawsuits against companies with connected watches and other wearables, like Garmin, Fitbit, Pebble, and Nike (PDF). It also sued tech companies like Apple, Samsung, and HP, and watchmakers including Timex, Tag Heuer, and Nixon.  It has sued over software, too, filing cases against popular fitness apps like Strava and even Aetna (PDF). Sportbrain argues that the health insurance company infringes its patent with its "Get Active" online platform. 

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Apple retakes the top spot in wearable device shipments

Apple retakes the top spot in wearable device shipments | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
It looks like Xiaomi's reign as the wearable device champion was short-lived. Canalys' latest estimates indicate that Apple regained the lead in wearabl
Richard Platt's insight:

It looks like Xiaomi's reign as the wearable device champion was short-lived. Canalys' latest estimates indicate that Apple regained the lead in wearable shipments during the third quarter of the year, shipping 3.9 million smartwatches over the summer. That's only slightly ahead of Xiaomi's 3.6 million and Fitbit's 3.5 million, but that's no mean feat when the Apple Watch is typically far more expensive (Xiaomi's Mi Band 2 cost $23 when new) and only works with one manufacturer's smartphones. And it's no surprise as to why Apple pulled out in front: new hardware.

Canalys' researchers attribute the shifting ranks to the Apple Watch Series 3 launch. Demand was strong enough that there were shortages in "major" markets, including China. And apparently, Series 3's cellular data support is a big draw -- analysts reckon that Apple shipped about 800,000 LTE-capable watches in the quarter. For comparison, Samsung is believed to have sold roughly 500,000 Gear S3 watches (LTE or otherwise) in the same period.  This doesn't mean the wearable space is suddenly red hot. While Apple, Xiaomi and Fitbit did well, Canalys believes the overall market shrank 2 percent to 17.3 million units. As it explains, demand for "basic bands" (that is, entry-level activity trackers) was on the decline. That's likely to be even more true now that Apple is more likely to keep up with Series 3 demand, and Fitbit is getting into full-fledged smartwatches with the Ionic. It's no longer enough in many cases to give people their step count and heart rate. They increasingly expect a full-fledged smartphone companion, and the market is changing accordingly.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from GAFAMS, STARTUPS & INNOVATION IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK
Scoop.it!

Apple Is Going After The Health Care Industry, Starting With Personal Health Data  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Apple Is Going After The Health Care Industry, Starting With Personal Health Data  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The market opportunity in health care is huge, and Apple sees health care and wellness as a core part of its app, services, and wearables strategies. Now the company is aiming to become your personal health record, jumping into research, medical devices, and more.

Via Giuseppe Fattori, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Richard Platt's insight:

The market opportunity in health care is huge, and Apple sees health care and wellness as a core part of its app, services, and wearables strategies. Now the company is aiming to become your personal health record, jumping into research, medical devices, and more

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Google and Levi’s first smart jacket is a wash

Google and Levi’s first smart jacket is a wash | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The nicest, best-looking piece of wearable tech is still not all that useful
Richard Platt's insight:

The nicest, best-looking piece of wearable tech is still not all that useful

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Levi’s teams up with Google to create a smart jacket

Levi’s teams up with Google to create a smart jacket | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Jacket has Jacquard by Google woven in, turning it into a touchpad for music and maps apps
Richard Platt's insight:

The Levi’s Commuter Trucker Jacket has Jacquard by Google woven into the left sleeve, turning it into a touchpad with gesture recognition, and a snap-on tag that acts as a hub for notifications, commands and the like.  When paired with your phone, it allows you to interact with your music or maps app, although headphones seem to be an integral part of this setup.

The problem? It’s $350 (€296) and according to Levi’s own information, the jacket can only be washed 10 times before the woven-in technology is affected, and your smart jacket becomes a regular dumb one again. Denim jackets probably aren’t a regular wash item, but it’s something to keep in mind.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Purdue Pharma unveils trial for wearable tech for chronic pain

Purdue Pharma unveils trial for wearable tech for chronic pain | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Purdue Pharma has announced a study, “Effect of Wearable Health Technology on the Treatment of Patients with Chronic Pain."
Richard Platt's insight:

The trial will assess the effect of the addition of wearable health technology on approximately 240 multidisciplinary pain-program patients being treated in the Geisinger system.  The wearable health technology includes an Apple Watch that will measure physical activity, patient-reported pain, disability, sleep quality, depression, medication use and heart rate, and will guide the patient toward non-pharmaceutical treatment alternatives such as stretching, mindfulness and thermotherapy.

The Apple Watch will include a pain app developed for this study, a health care provider dashboard and will integrate with Geisinger’s electronic medical record.  “The goal of this technology is to improve patient function and quality of life while reducing the need for analgesic medications,” said Tracy Mayne, head of Medical Affairs Strategic Research at Purdue Pharma. “It provides objective measures of numerous aspects of pain, function and treatment effectiveness so that information can be gathered for the patient and the healthcare provider in between visits.”

The 12-month study will enroll 240 consenting chronic pain patients ages 18 to 75 admitted to Geisinger’s Multiple Pain Program from Oct. 5 to Oct. 5, 2018.  The news comes following a lawsuit filed by the district attorneys general for five judicial districts in the eastern portion of Tennessee, which alleges Purdue Pharma aggressively marketed its product on the region through a sustained marketing campaign that downplayed the risks of addiction. Purdue and other opioid manufacturers have been the subject of similar lawsuits filed over the past several months.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Google's Pixel Buds translation will change the world

Google's Pixel Buds translation will change the world | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Google's Pixel 2 event in San Francisco on Wednesday had a lot of stuff to show off and most of it was more of the same: the next iteration of the flagshi
Richard Platt's insight:

Google quietly revealed that it had changed the world with a pair of wireless headphones. Not to be outdone by Apple's Air Pods and their wirelessly-charging TicTac storage case, Google packed its headphones (in combination with the Pixel 2) with the power to translate between 40 languages, literally in real-time. The company has finally done what science fiction and countless Kickstarters have been promising us, but failing to deliver on, for years. This technology could fundamentally change how we communicate across the global community.  The Google Pixel Buds are wireless headphones designed for use with the company's new Pixel 2 handset. Once you've paired the phones to the handset, you can simply tap the right earpiece and issue a command to Google Assistant on the Pixel 2. You can have it play music, give you directions, place a phone call and whatnot, you know, all the standards.  But if you tell it to "Help me speak Japanese" and then start speaking in English, the phone's speakers will output your translated words as you speak them. The other party's reply (presumably in Japanese because otherwise what exactly are you playing at?) will then play into your ear through the Pixel Buds. As Google's onstage demonstration illustrated, there appeared to be virtually zero lag time during the translation, though we'll have to see how well that performance holds up in the real world with wonky WiFi connections, background noise and crosstalk.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Qualcomm is working on a biometric patch to help doctors track patients

Qualcomm is working on a biometric patch to help doctors track patients | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Qualcomm has announced the development of biometric patches that will look to track the health and wellbeing of patients in medical care. The wearable…
Richard Platt's insight:

The wearable tech, which has been designed in collaboration with Benchmark Electronics, will allow medical professionals to monitor the real time data of a range of patients. Among many potential biometric features, the patches will provide data on clinical thermometry (read: 'temperature') and motion measurements that would otherwise be unavailable.  "This wearable patch technology will be transformative in its ability to provide timely and accurate data to enable care providers to make better-informed decisions," said James Mault, senior vice president and chief medical officer at Qualcomm Life.   The pair have now entered into a Healthcare Product License Agreement, which will see Benchmark free to use the reference designs of Qualcomm's patches for manufacture. Clinical validation is already underway, with the companies targeting commercial rollout in 2018.   This, of course, isn't the first example we've seen of biometric patches looking to aid those with medical conditions. Samsung teased its S-Patch 3 way back in January 2016, something which would likely offer wearers to access data such as continuous heart rate monitoring, skin temperature, galvanic skin response and body fat percentage. Meanwhile, both Apple and Fitbit are exploring solutions within their wearable arm to assist diabetics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

New 'Biosensitive' Tattoo Ink Can Read What's In Your Blood

Researchers at Harvard University and M.I.T. developed tattoos that can monitor chronic health issues as well as levels of dehydration and blood sugar.
Richard Platt's insight:

Thanks to wearable technology, you can go for a run and a fitness tracker will tell you how long you’ve exercised, your heart rate, and how many calories you’ve probably burned. That’s cool, sure, but there’s only so much it can tell you. Sitting on the surface of your skin, your Apple watch can’t analyze your metabolism, your dehydration levels, or your dwindling blood sugar levels. And to be honest, it makes you look like a dork.  How can you look like a badass and monitor your health? Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology recently announced a solution: Cover your body in biosensor tattoos, baby.  The researchers developed proof-of-concept tattoos using special ink that they claim can monitor health by changing colors. These biosensitive inks are described in a new paper, published as part of the Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers, under the deeply metal title “The Dermal Abyss.”   “This work could be expanded to monitor athletes and their health levels, people who have chronic conditions that need to be monitored like diabetes, and it could even be used on astronauts to monitor their health in space,” study co-author Nan Jiang, M.D. tells Inverse.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

The FDA just approved the first continuous glucose monitoring system

The FDA just approved the first continuous glucose monitoring system | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The FDA approved the FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System from Abbott Diabetes Care Inc., which uses a small sensor placed underneath the skin.
Richard Platt's insight:

The organization announced earlier this week it had given approval to the FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System from Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Instead of a fingerstick, it utilizes a small sensor placed underneath the skin, enabling it to continuously measure and monitor glucose levels; a mobile reader can be waved above the sensor to see if glucose levels are too high or too low.   The new system is intended for adults over the age of 18. The FDA explains it can be worn for up to 10 days after a 12-hour initialization period. However, it’s not capable of offering real-time alerts, or alerting the wearer of low blood sugar levels.   “The FDA is always interested in new technologies that can help make the care of people living with chronic conditions, such as diabetes, easier and more manageable,” said FDA Deputy Director of New Product Evaluation Donald St. Pierre. “This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of fingerstick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabetes—with a wave of the mobile reader.”

more...
No comment yet.