Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
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Stethoscope set to be supplanted by new technology

Stethoscope set to be supplanted by new technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Heart experts predict pocket-sized ultrasound machines will improve diagnostic accuracy and reduce complications

A doctor's most important accessory, the stethoscope, may be heading for the scrap heap after 200 years, it has been claimed.

The development of new, more accurate and compact ultrasound devices could soon consign the Victorian stethoscope to medical history, two US heart experts predicted.

Professor Jagat Narula and Dr Bret Nelson, both from Mount Sinai school of medicine in New York, said several manufacturers already made hand-held ultrasound machines that were slightly larger than a deck of cards. Evidence suggests that, compared with the stethoscope, the devices can reduce complications, assist in emergencies and improve diagnostic accuracy.

Currently even a top-of-the-range stethoscope costs only a fraction of the several thousand dollars needed to buy the cheapest ultrasound device.

But according to the experts, the falling price of new technology and changes in medical training could eventually see the stethoscope supplanted by pocket-sized ultrasound probes.

The simple listening tube for monitoring abnormal heartbeats and wheezing lungs has been a common sight around the necks of doctors since its invention in 1816.

Writing in the journal Global Heart, of which Narula is editor-in-chief, the authors conclude: "Certainly the stage is set for disruption; as LPs were replaced by cassettes, then CDs and MP3s, so too might the stethoscope yield to ultrasound.


Via Wildcat2030, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Stethoscope to be replaced

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Apple retakes the top spot in wearable device shipments

Apple retakes the top spot in wearable device shipments | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
It looks like Xiaomi's reign as the wearable device champion was short-lived. Canalys' latest estimates indicate that Apple regained the lead in wearabl
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It looks like Xiaomi's reign as the wearable device champion was short-lived. Canalys' latest estimates indicate that Apple regained the lead in wearable shipments during the third quarter of the year, shipping 3.9 million smartwatches over the summer. That's only slightly ahead of Xiaomi's 3.6 million and Fitbit's 3.5 million, but that's no mean feat when the Apple Watch is typically far more expensive (Xiaomi's Mi Band 2 cost $23 when new) and only works with one manufacturer's smartphones. And it's no surprise as to why Apple pulled out in front: new hardware.

Canalys' researchers attribute the shifting ranks to the Apple Watch Series 3 launch. Demand was strong enough that there were shortages in "major" markets, including China. And apparently, Series 3's cellular data support is a big draw -- analysts reckon that Apple shipped about 800,000 LTE-capable watches in the quarter. For comparison, Samsung is believed to have sold roughly 500,000 Gear S3 watches (LTE or otherwise) in the same period.  This doesn't mean the wearable space is suddenly red hot. While Apple, Xiaomi and Fitbit did well, Canalys believes the overall market shrank 2 percent to 17.3 million units. As it explains, demand for "basic bands" (that is, entry-level activity trackers) was on the decline. That's likely to be even more true now that Apple is more likely to keep up with Series 3 demand, and Fitbit is getting into full-fledged smartwatches with the Ionic. It's no longer enough in many cases to give people their step count and heart rate. They increasingly expect a full-fledged smartphone companion, and the market is changing accordingly.

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Apple Is Going After The Health Care Industry, Starting With Personal Health Data  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Apple Is Going After The Health Care Industry, Starting With Personal Health Data  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The market opportunity in health care is huge, and Apple sees health care and wellness as a core part of its app, services, and wearables strategies. Now the company is aiming to become your personal health record, jumping into research, medical devices, and more.

Via Giuseppe Fattori, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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The market opportunity in health care is huge, and Apple sees health care and wellness as a core part of its app, services, and wearables strategies. Now the company is aiming to become your personal health record, jumping into research, medical devices, and more

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Google and Levi’s first smart jacket is a wash

Google and Levi’s first smart jacket is a wash | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The nicest, best-looking piece of wearable tech is still not all that useful
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The nicest, best-looking piece of wearable tech is still not all that useful

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Levi’s teams up with Google to create a smart jacket

Levi’s teams up with Google to create a smart jacket | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Jacket has Jacquard by Google woven in, turning it into a touchpad for music and maps apps
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The Levi’s Commuter Trucker Jacket has Jacquard by Google woven into the left sleeve, turning it into a touchpad with gesture recognition, and a snap-on tag that acts as a hub for notifications, commands and the like.  When paired with your phone, it allows you to interact with your music or maps app, although headphones seem to be an integral part of this setup.

The problem? It’s $350 (€296) and according to Levi’s own information, the jacket can only be washed 10 times before the woven-in technology is affected, and your smart jacket becomes a regular dumb one again. Denim jackets probably aren’t a regular wash item, but it’s something to keep in mind.

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Purdue Pharma unveils trial for wearable tech for chronic pain

Purdue Pharma unveils trial for wearable tech for chronic pain | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Purdue Pharma has announced a study, “Effect of Wearable Health Technology on the Treatment of Patients with Chronic Pain."
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The trial will assess the effect of the addition of wearable health technology on approximately 240 multidisciplinary pain-program patients being treated in the Geisinger system.  The wearable health technology includes an Apple Watch that will measure physical activity, patient-reported pain, disability, sleep quality, depression, medication use and heart rate, and will guide the patient toward non-pharmaceutical treatment alternatives such as stretching, mindfulness and thermotherapy.

The Apple Watch will include a pain app developed for this study, a health care provider dashboard and will integrate with Geisinger’s electronic medical record.  “The goal of this technology is to improve patient function and quality of life while reducing the need for analgesic medications,” said Tracy Mayne, head of Medical Affairs Strategic Research at Purdue Pharma. “It provides objective measures of numerous aspects of pain, function and treatment effectiveness so that information can be gathered for the patient and the healthcare provider in between visits.”

The 12-month study will enroll 240 consenting chronic pain patients ages 18 to 75 admitted to Geisinger’s Multiple Pain Program from Oct. 5 to Oct. 5, 2018.  The news comes following a lawsuit filed by the district attorneys general for five judicial districts in the eastern portion of Tennessee, which alleges Purdue Pharma aggressively marketed its product on the region through a sustained marketing campaign that downplayed the risks of addiction. Purdue and other opioid manufacturers have been the subject of similar lawsuits filed over the past several months.

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Google's Pixel Buds translation will change the world

Google's Pixel Buds translation will change the world | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Google's Pixel 2 event in San Francisco on Wednesday had a lot of stuff to show off and most of it was more of the same: the next iteration of the flagshi
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Google quietly revealed that it had changed the world with a pair of wireless headphones. Not to be outdone by Apple's Air Pods and their wirelessly-charging TicTac storage case, Google packed its headphones (in combination with the Pixel 2) with the power to translate between 40 languages, literally in real-time. The company has finally done what science fiction and countless Kickstarters have been promising us, but failing to deliver on, for years. This technology could fundamentally change how we communicate across the global community.  The Google Pixel Buds are wireless headphones designed for use with the company's new Pixel 2 handset. Once you've paired the phones to the handset, you can simply tap the right earpiece and issue a command to Google Assistant on the Pixel 2. You can have it play music, give you directions, place a phone call and whatnot, you know, all the standards.  But if you tell it to "Help me speak Japanese" and then start speaking in English, the phone's speakers will output your translated words as you speak them. The other party's reply (presumably in Japanese because otherwise what exactly are you playing at?) will then play into your ear through the Pixel Buds. As Google's onstage demonstration illustrated, there appeared to be virtually zero lag time during the translation, though we'll have to see how well that performance holds up in the real world with wonky WiFi connections, background noise and crosstalk.

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Qualcomm is working on a biometric patch to help doctors track patients

Qualcomm is working on a biometric patch to help doctors track patients | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Qualcomm has announced the development of biometric patches that will look to track the health and wellbeing of patients in medical care. The wearable…
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The wearable tech, which has been designed in collaboration with Benchmark Electronics, will allow medical professionals to monitor the real time data of a range of patients. Among many potential biometric features, the patches will provide data on clinical thermometry (read: 'temperature') and motion measurements that would otherwise be unavailable.  "This wearable patch technology will be transformative in its ability to provide timely and accurate data to enable care providers to make better-informed decisions," said James Mault, senior vice president and chief medical officer at Qualcomm Life.   The pair have now entered into a Healthcare Product License Agreement, which will see Benchmark free to use the reference designs of Qualcomm's patches for manufacture. Clinical validation is already underway, with the companies targeting commercial rollout in 2018.   This, of course, isn't the first example we've seen of biometric patches looking to aid those with medical conditions. Samsung teased its S-Patch 3 way back in January 2016, something which would likely offer wearers to access data such as continuous heart rate monitoring, skin temperature, galvanic skin response and body fat percentage. Meanwhile, both Apple and Fitbit are exploring solutions within their wearable arm to assist diabetics.

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New 'Biosensitive' Tattoo Ink Can Read What's In Your Blood

Researchers at Harvard University and M.I.T. developed tattoos that can monitor chronic health issues as well as levels of dehydration and blood sugar.
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Thanks to wearable technology, you can go for a run and a fitness tracker will tell you how long you’ve exercised, your heart rate, and how many calories you’ve probably burned. That’s cool, sure, but there’s only so much it can tell you. Sitting on the surface of your skin, your Apple watch can’t analyze your metabolism, your dehydration levels, or your dwindling blood sugar levels. And to be honest, it makes you look like a dork.  How can you look like a badass and monitor your health? Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology recently announced a solution: Cover your body in biosensor tattoos, baby.  The researchers developed proof-of-concept tattoos using special ink that they claim can monitor health by changing colors. These biosensitive inks are described in a new paper, published as part of the Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers, under the deeply metal title “The Dermal Abyss.”   “This work could be expanded to monitor athletes and their health levels, people who have chronic conditions that need to be monitored like diabetes, and it could even be used on astronauts to monitor their health in space,” study co-author Nan Jiang, M.D. tells Inverse.

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The FDA just approved the first continuous glucose monitoring system

The FDA just approved the first continuous glucose monitoring system | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The FDA approved the FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System from Abbott Diabetes Care Inc., which uses a small sensor placed underneath the skin.
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The organization announced earlier this week it had given approval to the FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System from Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Instead of a fingerstick, it utilizes a small sensor placed underneath the skin, enabling it to continuously measure and monitor glucose levels; a mobile reader can be waved above the sensor to see if glucose levels are too high or too low.   The new system is intended for adults over the age of 18. The FDA explains it can be worn for up to 10 days after a 12-hour initialization period. However, it’s not capable of offering real-time alerts, or alerting the wearer of low blood sugar levels.   “The FDA is always interested in new technologies that can help make the care of people living with chronic conditions, such as diabetes, easier and more manageable,” said FDA Deputy Director of New Product Evaluation Donald St. Pierre. “This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of fingerstick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabetes—with a wave of the mobile reader.”

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GE Aviation Successfully Pilots Augmented Reality In Maintenance

GE Aviation Successfully Pilots Augmented Reality In Maintenance | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Collaboration between GE Aviation and Upskill software making progress in applying augmented reality to MRO processes.
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Properly tightened and torqued B-nuts are essential to engine fluid lines and hoses on a properly functioning engine. To achieve the right tensions, mechanics need to check the maintenance manual frequently, so the process takes a lot of back and forth away from the engine. To improve this process, GE Aviation has just piloted a process with mechanics using augmented reality.  The results: 8-12% efficiency improvements.

The six-month pilot program­—using Glass Enterprise Edition smart glasses (the 2.0 version of Google Glass) along with Upskill’s Skylight software for augmented reality devices and Atlas Copco’s digital torque wrench—involved translating work procedures into a file that could be interpreted by Skylight and fed into Glass, having 15 mechanics use the system and analyzing the results. Sixty percent of the mechanics involved said they prefer the augmented-reality process to the traditional way of doing things, and 85% believe it also will reduce errors.  “A novel part of our idea was to integrate a smart tool with the Google Glass and Skylight software,” so the team spent time with Atlas Copco figuring out what the right digital torque wrench is and how to integrate it all together, says Ted Robertson, GE Aviation’s manager of maintainability and human factors engineering. Upskill handled most of the integration piece, he says.  “I feel like once we’ve done it, it will be easier and faster to get another use case or test up and running, which is what we plan to do,” says Robertson. During the pilot, the team needed to determine how to get everything operating—and make it comply with GE’s IT and security requirements, in this case—so having established a road map for that should make subsequent projects shorter. GE’s pilot took about six months.

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New wellness study shows just how sticky wearables can be, even among seniors

New wellness study shows just how sticky wearables can be, even among seniors | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The interest in improving the sustained use of wearables goes beyond employer programs, according to the Annals of Internal Medicine study. It also applies to data collection for precision medicine initiatives to better target interventions.
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Quantifying the effectiveness of wearables to increase activity within the framework of a payer or employer wellness program has been the source of more than a few studies. Can financial incentives from these groups also steer participants to the desired outcome? Will participants be sufficiently engaged to use these wearables over a long period of time? What are some of the characteristics of the longer term users?   This area has been a topic of interest for Dr. Mitesh Patel, an assistant professor of Medicine and Health Care Management at University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School as well as director of Penn Medicine’s Nudge Unit.  But the interest in improving the sustained use of wearables goes beyond employer programs, according to the Annals of Internal Medicine study. It also applies to data collection for precision medicine initiatives to better target interventions.   In what Patel said is the largest study of its kind to evaluate the stickiness of wearables in a step counting program, 4.4 million Humana wellness program members were invited to take part. Of those, 55,000 actually downloaded the relevant app for the study, which was published in Annals of Internal Medicine.  Researchers analyzed data for a two-year period from 2014-2015 and tracked when participants first activated their activity tracker, how frequently the device was used in the first six months following activation, average daily step counts and sociodemographic characteristics, according to a news release from Penn.  In a phone interview Patel said he was struck that although 0.2 percent used the devices in year one, that rose to 1.2 percent in year two. In six months, 80 percent of the people who started using the device were still using it.

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A smartwatch could save your life

A smartwatch could save your life | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
DOCTORS will prescribe smartwatches to patients instead of time in cardiac units and sleep labs in the near future, in a move that could save more lives and money, according Fitbit chief executive James Park.
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DOCTORS will prescribe smartwatches to patients instead of time in cardiac units and sleep labs in the near future, in a move that could save more lives and money, according Fitbit chief executive James Park.  The Fitbit co-founder, who is due to visit Australia this week, said the company’s upcoming smartwatch would introduce sensors to detect breathing impairments for the first time, and the firm was also trialling ways to use its heart-rate sensor to warn of increased-stroke risk.  But Fitbit will face serious competition from the world’s richest technology firm, Apple, which last week launched a smartwatch with detailed heart-rate tracking and its own internet connection.  

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Why the Apple Watch is still a business plan in search of a product

Why the Apple Watch is still a business plan in search of a product | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Official site of The Week Magazine, offering commentary and analysis of the day's breaking news and current events as well as arts, entertainment, people and gossip, and political cartoons.
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It's Marketing 101: When you want to sell a product, you extol its virtues. But when Apple recently announced its new Watch 3, the company pitched the device as more than merely practical or fun. In the video that preceded the announcement, the company suggested the Watch helped people become better versions of themselves — and even suggested it can help save lives. Maybe this is Marketing 102, updated for the 21st century: When you really want to sell a product, make it seem like a person's life will be empty without it.  So when reviews of the latest Apple Watch landed this week, it was a surprise to see that disappointment abounded. Numerous reviewers had connectivity problems, while almost everyone found the battery life lacking — one tester saw their power drop to 30 percent by noon. More generally, while the Watch can hardly be called a failure, it hasn't exactly become a blockbuster hit either, in no small part because the promise of the device — a vital piece of tech for tracking health, staying connected, and being safe — has yet to entirely come to fruition.  The problem is that for all the lofty rhetoric, wearables as a category aren't yet either especially necessary or in demand. While Apple obviously keeps updating the Watch, Samsung and LG continue to partner with Google to make their own Android Wear watches, and all sorts of other wearables continue to be made. Despite the lack of success, everyone keeps throwing things at the wall to see what sticks. It can seem puzzling.

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Will wearable tech create a two-tier healthcare system?

Will wearable tech create a two-tier healthcare system? | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Health-tracking devices are on the rise, but what does it mean for people who can’t afford the technology?

Via Mike Rucker
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The cost of health

Growing corporate wellness programmes are attempting to combat the estimated £29 billion-a-year cost to UK business, lost because of sickness and absence. BP, for instance, offers discounts on the cost of health plans if their employees walk one million steps a year – verified with a wearable tracking device. Gartner forecasts that, by next year, two million people will be required to wear a fitness tracker by their employers.  Groups such as airline pilots and firefighters are expected to be the first to be targeted, as it’s important these groups get enough sleep and are not overly stressed when doing their jobs. However, when you move outside of these groups to ordinary workers, the use of technology for other forms of tracking becomes apparent.  

But is insurance moving towards the ultimate in personalised risk cover, with those using wearable health technologies able to gain cheaper premiums than those not using this technology?

“I hope not,” comments Hilary Stephenson, managing director of digital user experience agency Sigma. “But if people feel incentivised by it I can see it happening. For example, car insurance companies issue apps to monitor safe driving, which resulted in lower premiums for those who scored highly.

“People choosing to manage their own health and share their data with insurers and GPs because they want to understand positive outcomes is very different to making this use of technology and data sharing mandatory in order to better qualify for a service.”

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How to choose a fitness tracker

How to choose a fitness tracker | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
How to choose a fitness tracker: With so many fitness trackers on the market, it is difficult to choose the one that will best fit your needs. The right activity tracker will be based on your individual needs; whether it’s step counting, sleep tracking or 24/7 heart rate tracking, there’s something for everyone.
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(1) What is your budget? How much money do you want to spend?
(2) What do you want to track? Standard metrics or are you after something more advanced?
(3) Does the design appeal to you? This is a matter of personal taste.
(4) Colour display, black and white display, or no display?
(5) User experience
(6) Keeping it juiced
(7) GPS or no GPS?
(8) Is it water-resistant? Or swim friendly?
(9) Do you want a heart-rate monitor? Heart rate monitors vary greatly too.
(10) Do you want extras such as smart notifications, NFC payments, etc?

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The Devices That Are Making Wearable Tech Invisible

The Devices That Are Making Wearable Tech Invisible | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable tech is becoming invisible, which means people are developing high tech devices that are smaller than ever before. These devices are bringing pervasive
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Wearable tech is becoming invisible, which means people are developing high tech devices that are smaller than ever before. These devices are bringing pervasive computing closer and closer to reality. This includes placing microprocessors into any object that can be worn on the body; such as inside of shoes, T-shirts, a classic watch and even jewelry. Technology is at the shy beginning of holding hands with fashion; however there are a few companies that have products on the market today. Check them out below.

GameTraka is defining the new “shy tech,” meaning that they integrate technology in a way that is blind to the eye. Their product is a GPS device that is placed behind the wearers’ neck – like a kind of bra shape. It was launched in January 2015. GameTraka is aiming to fill a gap in the market for sport players. It is designed and developed for sub-elite athletes and amateur players. GameTraka allows to filter down to grass roots sport level and allow the wearer to track, measure and monitor physical performance based on facts.   

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Pay for Moscow public transport with a tap of your ring

With the same functionalities of the Troika card, the company behind the 'payring' say it will make commuting faster and simpler.
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The ‘Payring’ gives users the same functionalities of the Troika card, which lets people pay for their ride with a tap, similar to London’s Oyster card. The new ring will work on the metro, train and bus systems throughout the Russian capital city.

Moscow will be the first metro system in the world to use the technology and the result of the company’s tests show that the use of the rings could speed up the flow of passengers to and from the underground stations.  In February this year, the first metro rings were awarded as a prize for a competition for couples on Valentine’s Day but it’s expected they’ll be available for widespread purchase from the end of this month. Commuters can pick them up from the Moscow metro’s souvenir shops or at kiosks dotted around the city’s stations. The cost of the ring has not been announced yet.

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Wearable devices pack outsize safety punch for Insurance Industry

Wearable devices pack outsize safety punch for Insurance Industry | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable technology has advanced from simply storing data to helping prevent or reduce workplace accidents, and can provide employers and insurers with invaluable information, industry analysts say.
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David Roy, second vice president for Travelers Cos. Inc.’s Forensic Engineering Laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut, said the marketplace for wearable technology is predicted to reach $34 billion by 2020.   Keying on the safety issue, Mr. Roy said there are 35,000 “struck-by” accidents per year in the United States in construction and manufacturing, resulting in 200 fatalities a year.  “So imagine that little device on your wrist would talk to that fork truck or that fork truck driver, and perhaps prevent that injury,” Mr. Roy said. “It’s coming, it’s here.”   Mr. Roy noted that the shrinking size of technology is a large factor in the growth of wearables adoption, adding that “your phone has more computing power than NASA’s first space explorations.”

Thomas Ryan, senior principal and director of workers compensation research at Willis Towers Watson P.L.C. in New York, said data obtained from wearables is a huge topic for many risk managers, employers and workers comp coordinators. 

“A big area we’ve seen is predictive analytics,” Mr. Ryan said, “they love to see some way in which predictive analytics can be implemented to evaluate a safe work environment.”   Mr. Ryan said wearables are also being used to encourage employees to adopt a healthier life style, such as tracking how much they walk.

With so many uses, the devices are sometimes subject to overlapping regulations, an attorney on the panel said.

“Is it a clinical device, is it a leisure device, or is it a safety device?” said Miki Kolton, of counsel with the law firm Greenberg Traurig L.L.P. in Washington. “Because you have different definitions based upon the regulatory authority that you’re talking about.” 

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NIIST team fabricates a wearable antenna

NIIST team fabricates a wearable antenna | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The prototype made may need more improvements
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Wearable antenna embedded in a multilayered polyester fabric suitable for WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) applications may soon become a reality, thanks to the work by researchers at the National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (CSIR-NIIST), Thiruvananthapuram. The wearable WiMAX antenna, which is about 3 cm in length and nearly 4 cm in width, is flexible, light weight and operates at around 3.37 GHertz. Wearable antenna has applications in telemedicine, defence and environmental monitoring, among others.    “Our goal is to make wearable antenna which can be embedded in the jacket worn by soldiers in remote locations. We can connect the antenna to different sensors such as temperature, pressure and ECG sensors and the data can be transmitted to a remote server. The antenna can sense and communicate data in a non-intrusive manner. This way we can monitor the health of soldiers,” says Dr. P. Mohanan from Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi and one of the authors of the paper. Silver choice:  Conventionally, thin copper films cladded to glass reinforced epoxy substrates are used for making patch antennas and these antennas are not flexible.

The antenna fabrication can be dramatically simplified by printing technology using copper ink where the radiating patch as well as bottom electrode can be screen printed onto flexible substrates including fabrics. But the use of copper ink is fraught with problems as it gets oxidized easily thus compromising the performance of the antenna.

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Disney and Garmin gamify exercise with Vívofit Jr. 2 wearable for kids

Disney and Garmin gamify exercise with Vívofit Jr. 2 wearable for kids | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Mobile Marketer
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Insight:

Companies like Garmin, FitBit and Apple have introduced wearable products like activity trackers and watches that aim to help people be more aware of their activities and encourage more physical activity. Garmin introduced its first Vívofit Jr. for children last year. The kid-centered devices are smaller versions of the company's Vívofit fitness tracker for adults.

In the Vívofit Jr. Garmin and Disney are combining physical activity with mobile tech by gamifying exercise and making it more fun for kids and easily trackable for busy parents. This is just the latest example of brands leveraging wearable tech to bridge digital and offline worlds, while also likely driving app installs and mobile engagement for the brands among both kids and parents. 

 

The global market for wearable technology is poised to grow about 17% this year worldwide, according to a Gartner study cited by TechCrunch. The researcher forecasts global sales of 310.4 million wearable devices this year with $30.5 billion in sales. About $9.3 billion of that amount will likely be for smartwatches, such as the Apple Watch and Samsung’s Gear watch.

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A list of everything Magic Leap has released so far

A list of everything Magic Leap has released so far | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Things released by Magic Leap, a company which has raised $1.4B from investors, to date: A patent for some chill looking glasses Rumors of a new..
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Things released by Magic Leap, a company which has raised $1.4B from investors, to date:

Magic Leap has been very, very willing to talk endlessly about its unreleased product without actually saying anything. We eagerly await the payoff for the above list.

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Pay for your coffee with this analogue Timex

Pay for your coffee with this analogue Timex | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
It has bPay in the straps, and won't break the bank
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Timex has just announced an analogue watch with a contactless payment strap, letting you pay for coffees, shopping, and the underground with a tap of the wrist.    The technology has been added to Timex's most popular styles, the Fairfield Chronograph. 

The payment smarts come from bPay, enabling you to make purchases of £30 (or under).   You'll also be able to track their spending, top up their balance, and take control of their contactless payments using the dedicated bPay app or website.

“We are thrilled to be launching our newest innovation in wearable technology and partnering with bPay,” said Duncan Harris, TIMEX UK Sales & Marketing Director.   “The functionality of the Fairfield Contactless watch gives our consumer the option of hands free payment, whilst retaining the timeless character of this classic chronograph watch. 

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Global Wearable Robotic Exoskeleton Market to Grow at a Rapid Rate

Global Wearable Robotic Exoskeleton Market to Grow at a Rapid Rate | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The global wearable robotic exoskeleton market size is expected to grow from 2017- 2026. View Research Report of Exoskeleton Market trends and Industry Size.
Richard Platt's insight:

The first exoskeleton was invented in 1980 by Nicholas Yagin, in Russia, which an assembled set of apparatus assisting in walking, jumping and running. Ever since its inception, exoskeleton has captured the awe and imagination of researchers and the robotics industry, but it gained popularity fairly late, only a few years ago.

 

The advancements in the robotics technologies have been on a rapid growth which led to the emergence of robotic exoskeletons. Exoskeletons are defined as robotic wearable devices, providing augmentation to the body parts, rehabilitation of the dysfunctional sensory movements, and assistance to the disabled people.  There has been an overwhelming need and interest in this domain of robotics and researchers are contemplating to incorporate sensing and assistive technologies into therapy for neurological disorders such as stroke, central nervous system disorder, and spinal cord injury. This has led to an increase in the demand for exoskeletons for rehabilitation and assistive applications.

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Chinese Wearable Device Company Now Largest In World, Ahead of Apple and Fitbit

Chinese Wearable Device Company Now Largest In World, Ahead of Apple and Fitbit | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A Chinese (FXI) tech revolution is underway as Chinese tech giant Xiaomi dethroned Apple (AAPL) and Fitbit (FIT) as the global leader in wearable devices. Chinese smartphones are also capturing market share from Apple & Samsung. International Data Corporate (IDC)’s World Quarterly Wearable Device Tracker report for the second quarter highlighted the growing market for wearable devices. Shipments for wearable devices grew 10.3% to 26.3 million. Shipments of smartwatches climbed 61% backed by growing need for fitness and fashion conscious population.
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Xiaomi dethrones Apple & FitBit in the wearable devices segment  A shot has been fired from the East in the global digital revolution with Chinese tech giant Xiaomi recently dethroning Apple and Fitbit as the global leader in wearable devices. Chinese smartphones are also capturing market share from Apple & Samsung. International Data Corporation’s (IDC) World Quarterly Wearable Device Tracker report for the second quarter highlighted the growing market for wearable devices. Shipments for wearable devices grew 10.3% to 26.3 million. Shipments of smartwatches climbed 61% backed by growing demand of a fitness and fashion conscious population.  

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Wearable Sensors May Hit Billion-Dollar Benchmark 

Wearable Sensors May Hit Billion-Dollar Benchmark  | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Researchers predict that 2017 will be the first billion dollar year for wearable sensors.
Richard Platt's insight:

Those observant researchers at IDTechEx are predicting 2017 will be the first billion dollar year for wearable sensors. One might’ve expected that number to be much higher, given all the hype wearables get. Also, since wearables are primarily consumer-centric, again one would expect the figures to be higher. However, the company’s exhaustive report, ““Wearable Sensors 2018-2028: etc.” spans three-plus years of observation that yields a comprehensive characterization and outlook for each type of wearable sensor.  The report addresses 21 different types of wearable sensors across nine different categories:

  1. Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs)
  2. optical sensors
  3. electrodes
  4. force/pressure/stretch sensors
  5. temperature sensors
  6. microphones
  7. GPS
  8. chemical and gas sensors
  9. esoteric and miscellaneous 

Just as a side note, wearables, like any and all products that employ sensors in all applications, use pretty much all sensor types. These include pressure sensors, position sensors, temperature, moisture, and motion sensors, etc.

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