Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
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Google overhauls Wear OS to up the ante against Apple

Google overhauls Wear OS to up the ante against Apple | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Google overhauls Wear OS to up the ante against Apple - SiliconANGLE
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Hot on the heels of a report that Apple Inc. could launch a new iteration of the Apple Watch next month, Google LLC is upgrading its own wearable technology.  The company today unveiled an overhauled version of its Wear OS platform that will bring significant changes to the user experience. The new release introduces deep integration with the Alphabet Inc. subsidiary’s Google Assistant artificial intelligence, as well as faster access to information and key features.  It’s the Google Assistant integration that will likely make the biggest difference for device owners. Like Siri on the Apple Watch, the AI can now generate personalized information cards for users to help them plan out each day.  Google Assistant tailors the content to different situations. If a user checks their Wear OS device in the morning, for example, the AI can show the weather forecast for the day and warn if there are expected traffic delays. The service also can integrate with a person’s calendar to display forthcoming events.   Google said that Wear OS provides more context-specific information as well. If a user is going on a business trip, Google Assistant can highlight restaurants near the chosen hotel. It also flags features that device owners haven’t tried yet at opportune times to help them make better use of their wearable.  The Google Assistant integration is joined by a revamped notification system. Wear OS now displays messages in a scrollable feed that enables users to quickly sift through new items and access Google’s Smart Reply feature. The capability, which came to Gmail earlier this year, makes it possible to answer a message quickly by selecting one of three automatically generated responses.  Lastly, the new Wear OS release brings faster access to Google Fit. Users can now bring up the health tracking app simply by swiping left on the interface. Google Fit also received a major upgrade this week that introduced two new activity tracking tools the company developed in collaboration with the American Heart Association and the World Health Organization.   Google said that the new Wear OS features will roll out to users over the next month.  

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Google will mandate review process to boost Wear OS app quality

Google will mandate review process to boost Wear OS app quality | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Google is concerned that Wear OS apps aren’t meeting their full potential under the Play Store’s optional app review process, so it will make pre-release reviews mandatory starting in October. The current optional review system has been used since the launch of Android Wear 2.0 last year.

Richard Platt's insight:

Google is concerned that Wear OS apps aren’t meeting their full potential under the Play Store’s optional app review process, so it will make pre-release reviews mandatory starting in October. The current optional review system has been used since the launch of Android Wear 2.0 last year.  Developers should note two deadlines: New Wear OS apps will face mandatory reviews starting on October 1, 2018. Existing apps will start to be reviewed on March 4, 2019.  Google suggests that app reviews will be “lightweight,” and solely for the purpose of improving app quality across multiple devices. “Mobile app updates will not be blocked if they fail the Wear app review,” the company notes, so including support for a wearable won’t hold back the progress of a phone app. The app review process itself isn’t changing, and Google’s review criteria remain available for developers to consult in advance. Two issues that commonly come up during reviews are lack of a Wear OS screenshot, and missing support for certain screen types — round, round with chin, and square are supported. Google expects that adding screenshots will improve app discoverability, while supporting more screen types will increase user interest.  Going forward, developers who want to test “early prototypes” of Wear apps without facing app review should use Google Play’s internal testing features or manually deploy Wear APKs to users.  Google says that app reviews will be required for apps using the Play Store’s open and closed test channels, to avoid creating last-minute issues ahead of app deployment.

Google’s increased attention to app quality lines up with rumors that a Pixel-branded watch will debut this fall, and the company certainly needs its own hero product to compete with Apple, Fitbit, and Samsung wearables. Its plans may be unveiled at a Qualcomm event on September 10, which is expected to star an unnamed flagship smartwatch — and definitely not the Exynos 9110-powered Samsung Galaxy Watch announced last week.

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Brain Power Ships Empowered Brain

Brain Power Ships Empowered Brain | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Neurotechnology company Brain Power has shipped the first 60 units of its award-winning Empowered Brain smartglasses.
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Boston-based neurotechnology company Brain Power has shipped the first 60 units of its award-winning Empowered Brain™ smart-glasses, and plans to ship successive rounds of orders ahead of schedule. Orders for the world’s first wearable system to help people with autism gain self-sufficiency, were placed earlier this year during the most successful autism-related crowdfunding campaign ever ($165,000). Families or schools can now buy Empowered Brain from the company’s website at a limited-time deep discount.  The Google Augmented Reality (AR) glasses teach life skills to people with autism or on IEPs for social-emotional learning or behaviors.  Empowered Brain helps students with autism (or those on IEP’s for social-emotional learning or behaviors) teach themselves crucial life skills.  The computerized glasses can be worn by children or adults while they interact with a parent or teacher. Artificial intelligence detects things like faces and emotions. Users get points for making eye contact, for instance, or for guessing how the partner is feeling.  The system includes scientifically-validated Google Glass apps, a phone app, and an advanced web portal to view an unprecedented level of data and progress reports (for home use or school IEPs). Other apps in the system focus on managing transitions, self-regulation, and job skills. A number of schools are already using the system. 

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Qualcomm’s overdue smartwatch chip may finally come on September 10th

Qualcomm’s overdue smartwatch chip may finally come on September 10th | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Time may finally be up for Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Wear 2100, the venerable yet outdated processor that has served as essentially the only option for WearOS watch manufacturers since it launche
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Time may finally be up for Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Wear 2100, the venerable yet outdated processor that has served as essentially the only option for WearOS watch manufacturers since it launched two years ago — back when the platform was called Android Wear. Qualcomm has sent out invitations for a September 10th press event focused on smartwatches (via Android Police), which would suggest a new wearables-focused chip is on the way.  Qualcomm has already said as much, with its head of wearables previously confirming that a new processor and mysterious flagship device will be announced this fall; watches from other manufacturers are set to come by the holidays. The silicon is said to focus on efficiency, as you’d expect, enabling smaller watches with better battery life. Qualcomm did recently launch the Snapdragon Wear 2500 processor, but that’s designed for low-end kids’ watches that run a custom version of Android.

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Fossil's New Smartwatches Make Your Heart Beat Faster - and Show You

Fossil's New Smartwatches Make Your Heart Beat Faster - and Show You | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Fossil has announced two new smartwatches that cure a pain point of older models, by including a heart rate sensor, NFC, GPS, and water resistance. The Q Explorist HR is for larger wrists, while the Q Venture HR is for smaller ones. Here's everything you need to know about Fossil's stylish new wearables.
Richard Platt's insight:

Fossil knows what it’s doing when it comes to smartwatches, a point proven with its newest Q Explorist HR and Q Venture HR models, which combine plenty of technology with strong designs that retain the iconic Fossil look. These new fourth-generation watches fix one of the issues we had with the older Q Explorist, and with other similar smartwatches — they didn’t quite have the tech ability to replace a good fitness tracker.  Before we get to the tech, let’s look at the differences between the Q Explorist HR and Q Venture HR. It’s all in the design and style. The Q Explorist is the larger of the two watches with a 45mm stainless steel case and a 22mm strap size, while the smaller Q Venture HR has a 40mm case and an 18mm strap. There are five different designs for the Q Venture HR, with stainless steel or gold bodies and leather or metal link straps, or four different Q Explorist HR designs to choose from. 

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The HoloSuit delivers full-body tracking in a compact package

The HoloSuit delivers full-body tracking in a compact package | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The HoloSuit is a full-body tracker designed for VR and AR platforms. It’s impressive, but expensive.
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Full-body tracking was once the stuff of movie studios and theme parks, but thanks to the proliferation of low-cost motion sensors, gyroscopes, and accelerometers, it’s finally beginning to trickle down to the consumer space. Trackstrap sells a product that works with the HTC Vive virtual reality (VR) headset, as does Perception Neuron. And for the most part, both capture joint and muscle movement just as well as their Hollywood counterparts.

The trouble is, they’re designed with stationary setups in mind. You’re pretty much out of luck if your VR or AR platform of choice happens to be mobile-first, like Google’s Daydream View, Samsung’s Gear VR, or Facebook’s Oculus Go.  That motivated Harsha Kikkeri, a former Microsoft engineer who helped to develop the Seattle company’s motion-tracking Kinect sensor, to build something a bit more flexible. His solution is the HoloSuit, a patented full-body tracker consisting of a jacket, a pair of gloves, and pants embedded with sensors that track movements, haptic motors that provide force feedback, and programmable buttons that correspond to computer, smartphone, wearable, and tablet controls.  Kikkeri calls it “motion tracking for the real world.

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Why the Logistics Industry is Going Hands-Free

Why the Logistics Industry is Going Hands-Free | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The logistics industry has been thinking hands-free for years now. It has since moved on from arm-worn scanners to vision picking & wearable safety devices.

Via Sara Mautino
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The logistics industry has been thinking hands-free for years now. It has since moved on from arm-worn scanners to vision picking & wearable safety devices

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Lumos' smart helmet recognizes hand gestures via Apple Watch

Lumos' smart helmet recognizes hand gestures via Apple Watch | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Lumos has launched a smart bike helmet that flashes a turn signal when the user makes a hand gesture.
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Lumos has launched a smart bike helmet that flashes a turn signal when the user makes a hand gesture.  The Lumos helmet works with an app on the Apple Watch, which can detect gestures via its internal sensors. You can indicate a left or right turn with your arm, and the helmet will flash a corresponding turn signal on the back of the helmet with a red light.  The Lumos helmet will be available in more than 300 Apple stores across the U.S. and Europe this spring.

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Adidas closes its digital sports division

Adidas closes its digital sports division | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Sportswear brands might be reviving their interest in fitness technology, but Adidas is staging its comeback in a very roundabout way. The company's America
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Not sure how this turnabout at Adidas is supposed to happen in the current era we live in, but hey stranger things have happened

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The Fitbit Ionic’s first major update adds new apps and watchfaces

The Fitbit Ionic’s first major update adds new apps and watchfaces | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Finally, a Flipboard Fitbit app
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Fitbit is releasing the first major update to the Fitbit OS software on its flagship Ionic smartwatch today, bringing a host of new apps and watchfaces to the fledging smartwatch platform.

Leading the charge are 14 new apps from major companies that have been designed specifically for Fitbit’s platform: Surfline, Clue, Game Golf, Hue Lights, Walgreens, Nest, Yelp, Flipboard, The New York Times, TripAdvisor, Uber, United Airlines, British Airways, and Lyft. Some of those apps (like The New York Times, Yelp, and Hue Lights) will be available starting today, but the majority are slated as coming “before the end of the year” or in January.  Fitbit has also designed three new watchfaces for the Ionic that are bundled with the new update: levels, threads, and mountainscape.  Additionally, there’s a new Fitbit Leaderboard app, which lets users compare their fitness stats against friends and family directly from the Ionic.

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285 Million Hearable Devices On The Way

285 Million Hearable Devices On The Way | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
285 Million Hearable Devices On The Way - 11/28/2017
Richard Platt's insight:
 

Part of the wearables market is morphing into a hearables market.  Ever since Apple, Google and more smartphone makers started ditching the audio jack in a move to wireless audio, the market for wireless hearing devices has taken off.  Within five years, there will be 285 million hearables in use, a growth rate of 46% a year, according to a new forecast from Juniper Research.  The research firm defines a hearable as ‘an ear-based wearable device that supplies aural content or information to the wearer that is either generated by computations and data on the device itself or by an attached app.’  There are six stages of a given market, with hearables pretty much in the middle. Here’s how Juniper defines the six stages:

  1. Early stages of development, but offering significant potential
  2. Gaining traction, but not yet fulfilled potential
  3. Established technologies delivering good revenue and still evolving
  4. Technology and business cases are established
  5. Initial markets saturated, expansion needed
  6. Total market saturation, unit sales based almost entirely on product refreshes across all markets

Hearables are considered to be at the third phase, delivering revenue while still evolving. For context, the overall Bluetooth headset market is considered to be at the fifth phase.

Most (70%) of the market is projected to be concentrated in North America and Europe.

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Patent troll that sued over Apple Watch and 80 other fitness products meets its match

Patent troll that sued over Apple Watch and 80 other fitness products meets its match | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
CEO defends patent lawsuits: "We will slingshot our IP at all the offenders."
Richard Platt's insight:

A patent troll that has sued more than 80 companies by laying broad claims to Internet-connected "wearables" may be nearing the end of its road.  The patent appeals board at the US Patent and Trademark Office has agreed to reconsider 16 patent claims owned by Sportbrain Holdings, LLC. The Patent Office's decision comes just three days after Sportbrain filed a lawsuit against Apple (PDF). Taking on its highest-profile target yet, Sportbrain claims that the Apple Watch violates US Patent No. 7,454,002, titled "Integrating personal data capturing functionality into a portable computing device and a wireless communication device."  In dozens of lawsuits, Sportbrain's lawyers have argued that its patent entitles it to collect royalties on a huge range of devices and software products that gather user fitness information. Beginning in January 2016, Sportbrain unleashed a torrent of lawsuits against companies with connected watches and other wearables, like Garmin, Fitbit, Pebble, and Nike (PDF). It also sued tech companies like Apple, Samsung, and HP, and watchmakers including Timex, Tag Heuer, and Nixon.  It has sued over software, too, filing cases against popular fitness apps like Strava and even Aetna (PDF). Sportbrain argues that the health insurance company infringes its patent with its "Get Active" online platform. 

 
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Apple retakes the top spot in wearable device shipments

Apple retakes the top spot in wearable device shipments | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
It looks like Xiaomi's reign as the wearable device champion was short-lived. Canalys' latest estimates indicate that Apple regained the lead in wearabl
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It looks like Xiaomi's reign as the wearable device champion was short-lived. Canalys' latest estimates indicate that Apple regained the lead in wearable shipments during the third quarter of the year, shipping 3.9 million smartwatches over the summer. That's only slightly ahead of Xiaomi's 3.6 million and Fitbit's 3.5 million, but that's no mean feat when the Apple Watch is typically far more expensive (Xiaomi's Mi Band 2 cost $23 when new) and only works with one manufacturer's smartphones. And it's no surprise as to why Apple pulled out in front: new hardware.

Canalys' researchers attribute the shifting ranks to the Apple Watch Series 3 launch. Demand was strong enough that there were shortages in "major" markets, including China. And apparently, Series 3's cellular data support is a big draw -- analysts reckon that Apple shipped about 800,000 LTE-capable watches in the quarter. For comparison, Samsung is believed to have sold roughly 500,000 Gear S3 watches (LTE or otherwise) in the same period.  This doesn't mean the wearable space is suddenly red hot. While Apple, Xiaomi and Fitbit did well, Canalys believes the overall market shrank 2 percent to 17.3 million units. As it explains, demand for "basic bands" (that is, entry-level activity trackers) was on the decline. That's likely to be even more true now that Apple is more likely to keep up with Series 3 demand, and Fitbit is getting into full-fledged smartwatches with the Ionic. It's no longer enough in many cases to give people their step count and heart rate. They increasingly expect a full-fledged smartphone companion, and the market is changing accordingly.

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Garmin's New Fitness Tracker Has a 'Body Battery' Feature That Tells You When You're Too Tired to Exercise

Garmin's New Fitness Tracker Has a 'Body Battery' Feature That Tells You When You're Too Tired to Exercise | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
If you compare all of the ~$100 fitness trackers currently available, you’ll find a lot of similarities when it comes to their hardware, design, and functionality. So to make its new vívosmart 4 stand out, Garmin has instead tried to innovate on the software side by using all of the data the wearable is tracking to provide new insights about how your body is doing, including a new Body Battery feature that estimates your energy levels.
Richard Platt's insight:

If you compare all of the ~$100 fitness trackers currently available, you’ll find a lot of similarities when it comes to their hardware, design, and functionality. So to make its new vívosmart 4 stand out, Garmin has instead tried to innovate on the software side by using all of the data the wearable is tracking to provide new insights about how your body is doing, including a new Body Battery feature that estimates your energy levels  The vívosmart 4's $130 price tag means the fitness tracker doesn’t include any GPS functionality, which is what Garmin’s products are typically known for, and which might make it a pass for hardcore runners.  But it does manage to squeeze an optical heart rate and pulse ox sensor into a wearable that looks quite a bit thinner than its predecessor, the vívosmart 3. It’s arguably a bit more stylish too, with a rubber strap available in fancy-sounding colors like berry, powder grey, and azure blue mixed with gold and silver bezels, but no one’s going to mistake it for anything other than a fitness tracker.  What makes the vívosmart 4 worth actually wearing all day long is a couple of software features that sound quite useful, if they work as promised. The aforementioned Body Battery uses data about your stress level (a feature introduced with the vívosmart 3), heart rate, quality of sleep, and overall physical activity to estimate your body’s energy levels throughout the day.   With a score closer to 100, Garmin suggests your body is ready for a vigorous workout, but when it drops closer to zero, it might instead be a good idea for you to catch up on rest and sleep. It’s not a definitive measurement by any stretch, but the metric might help you feel a little less guilty about skipping a workout when you’re just not feeling it.   Garmin also wants you to wear its new vívosmart 4 at night, as the heart rate sensor’s ability to also monitor pulse oximetry—the amount of oxygen in your blood—can help detect issues, such as sleep apnea, when it comes to your breathing while you slumber. The wearable can also use heart rate and motion data to estimate your body going through the various stages of sleep throughout the night, which can then be reviewed and graphed over time via the Garmin app on your smartphone so you can potentially figure out why you’re waking up so exhausted. It won’t give you any definitive solutions on how to sleep better, but the data could help you spot trends and correlations screwing up your slumber. Maybe your neighbors are cranking their tunes at 2am every day?

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Researchers at Rutgers University develop wearable that can count blood cells, air particles

Researchers at Rutgers University develop wearable that can count blood cells, air particles | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Researchers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick claim to have come up with a new wearable that can detect blood cell counts as well as particles in the air. 

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Researchers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick claim to have come up with a new wearable that can detect blood cell counts as well as particles in the air. "Current wearables can measure only a handful of physical parameters such as heart rate and exercise activity," Abbas Furniturewalla, the study's lead author and a former undergraduate researcher in Rutger's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, said in a statement. "The ability for a wearable device to monitor the counts of different cells in our bloodstream would take personal health monitoring to the next level.”  The research, which was recently published in Microsystems and Nanoengineering, outlines the device design. Researchers created an arm wearable that includes a microfluidic impedance cytometer on a flexible substrate with a microfluidic biosensor.  Through a pin-prick blood sample pipetted into a standard microfluidic PDMS chip, the system is able to count blood cells quicker than the standard of care, the researcher said. The system is also able to transfer data through a circuit to process electrical signals and a micro-controller which can digitize the data and sent it to a Bluetooth module, according to a statement.   Once the system gets the blood cell count, it is then able to transfer the data over to a doctor via a smartphone. The researchers said that in the future they will continue to test the platform by sampling data as it is being worn during activities. This will allow them to adjust the circuit biosensor design to lessen the effects of motion and “environmental disturbance” on the device.  But it isn’t just blood cells that this wearable is focused on. Researchers said it is also able to count organic and inorganic particles in the air that could contribute to our health. "This would be really important for settings with lots of air pollutants and people want to measure the amount of tiny particles or dust they're exposed to day in and day out,” Mehdi Javanmard, senior author of the study and assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the School of Engineering, said in a statement. "Miners, for example, could sample the environment they're in."

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Fashion Or Functionality? Consumers Try To Make Sense Of Wearable Technology

Fashion Or Functionality? Consumers Try To Make Sense Of Wearable Technology | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Is this device on my wrist a piece of jewelry or a computer? The answer will influence the entire product evaluation process. You may compare that Vuitton smartwatch to other high-end luxury watches or to other fitness trackers.
Richard Platt's insight:

Wearable technology has become a buzzword among marketers, consumers and well-being gurus. CCS Insight projects that the wearables market will grow to $34 billion by 2020.   But what exactly is wearable technology? The devices now flooding the market offer varied functionality – from activity tracking to mobile connectivity to medical monitoring. The Fitbit tracker, Apple smartwatch, Tambour Horizon smartwatch by Louis Vuitton and Sano’s glucose monitoring patch are all, technically, wearable technology. We are also seeing new products and vendors entering the wearable technology market, including fashion icons like Fossil along with their sub-brands and emerging companies like BBK and Li-Ning, that tap into niche segments of the wearables market. Fossil sells a luxury/fashion device, while BBK focuses on child-monitoring devices, and Li-Ning offers step-counting shoes.  As my own research with colleagues in the United Kingdom has found, shoppers struggle a bit to make sense out of this wearable avalanche. Our brains love to categorize new objects, preferably with a label that we’ve already applied to other things in the past. Just as we stereotype people, once we put a product into a category it’s very difficult for us to move it out of that niche. That means we apply the criteria we use to judge other members of that category to the new item. So that first impression is crucial – and in this case many consumers find themselves at a crossroads: For example, is this device on my wrist first and foremost a piece of jewelry or a computer? Depending upon how a shopper answers that question, the entire product evaluation process may look quite different. He or she will either compare that Louis Vuitton smartwatch to other high-end luxury watches or to other fitness trackers. Very few wearables out there can win both of these competitions.  While they offer a variety of capabilities, what unites most wearable technology products is that they use sensors makers embedded into everyday products like a watch, shoe, headband or necklace. This explains why apparel and footwear companies as well as tech brands are interested in this new hybrid category. Fashion designers like Tory Burch and Swarovski now offer wearable technology accessories that integrate with major activity trackers. For example, the Louis Vuitton Tambour watch includes a proprietary app linked to the Louis Vuitton city guides. The watch will know where you are at what time and can recommend the best nearby restaurant or bar or shop in seven world capitals.  Industry analysts predict that apparel fitted with intelligent agent technology is where the greatest opportunities lie for the wearable technology market. Smart clothing is just starting to emerge as a significant market entity. Now, companies like SamsungGoogleOMSignalHexo Skin and Under Armour are looking into ways to makes apparel as smart as smartphones. Since most wearable technology products are fitness-focused, smart clothing so far has followed in those footsteps with incredibly accurate fitness metrics.

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Three Ways To Use Wearable Technology To Enhance The Customer Experience

Three Ways To Use Wearable Technology To Enhance The Customer Experience | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Wearable technologies can enhance the customer experience in a number of ways.
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Here are three ways your company can incorporate wearable technology to enhance the customer experience:

1. Track All Customer Desires

Wearables record tons of data, so it makes sense that this information could give you insights that you might not have collected because the customer did not know how to express their desires. That's where companies like Carnival Cruises have developed a way to get a deep understanding of what their customers want so they can immediately deliver that as part of the customer experience through the use of what looks like a medallion. Walt Disney World has done something similar with a band that looks like a Fitbit.  Both offer a way for customers to do everything they want, like order and buy merchandise, create itineraries and more. The Carnival Cruise medallion even provides directions to different activities on the ship and opens cabin doors. In the process, all that data is synthesized and analyzed to improve those interactions and learn more about a customers' preferences. In this way, technology can further the marketing effort.

2. Improve Security Without Diminishing The Customer Experience

One of the most challenging aspects my own company has faced has been ensuring the most secure payment environment for our customers. Identity verification and authorization processes have become so much more important to transactions. While we have added effective security technology like blockchain distributed ledgers to our solution, we were looking to do even more. This is especially important in an age where customers are beginning to take control of their own data through regulations like the General Data Protection Regulation in the EU.  By combining blockchain technology, which allows customers to decide who gets what data and when, with the potential to leverage wearables for biometric authorization and transfer of specific pieces of data, we have the opportunity to create an easy, fast transaction experience for the customer while ensuring a higher level of security to combat fraud. Essentially, a customer's heartbeat or face could become their password.

3. Use With Internal Staff To Address Customer Expectations

While many companies have put the wearable device on the customer for an improved experience, also consider how having your internal team wear them can improve the overall customer experience. This helps identify places in the physical environment where the customer interacts with the brand that can be addressed in real time for better results.  For example, the Cincinnati Airport gave its janitors Samsung Gear S3 smartwatches which allowed them to stay on top of supplies refreshment and cleanups in restrooms. Although this seems like a small area, companies need to look at every component of a customer's experience to see where incremental improvements can be made.  Another benefit of such technology is that it helped the airport understand how long it takes for janitors to do their job and how well their work is received by customers in surveys. This focus on customer experience improvements can be aligned with employee performance through the data collected. In return, the employees better understand how their performance impacts how customers view the brand, no matter how small their role seems.

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Magic Leap reveals Landscape and Immersive mixed reality app UIs

Magic Leap reveals Landscape and Immersive mixed reality app UIs | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
We’re getting a first look at Magic Leap One’s 2D and 3D user interfaces, including Landscape and Immersive apps, which were revealed in the company’s latest developer documentation.
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Details on Magic Leap’s new spatial computing platform are continuing to trickle out as it comes closer to its summer deadline for shipping developer units. This week, we’re getting a first look at Magic Leap One’s 2D and 3D user interfaces, including Landscape and Immersive apps, which were found by TechCrunch in the company’s latest developer documentation.  Magic Leap describes Landscape as “the canvas for spatial computing in the real world” and the place where “users can customize their environment and create a seamless experience between the digital and physical world.” In essence, Landscape is Magic Leap’s version of a computer’s desktop, enabling the user to place and interact with multiple apps across a real space such as an office or living room.Landscape overlays 2D or 3D surfaces called “prisms” on top of the real world, with each 2D prism displaying text, icons, and objects in ways that will instantly look familiar to users of Windows or Apple devices. A Home screen has circular Apple Watch-like icons below a Wi-Fi, clock, and battery bar, while a sample media gallery runs nicely spaced columns of photos together under a dateline.

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4 ways wearables can benefit your workforce

4 ways wearables can benefit your workforce | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Smart watches, smart glasses, and exoskeletons can augment workers' abilities and increase productivity, according to a Deloitte report.
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1. Enhancing strength and endurance

Companies that require physical labor can equip workers with exoskeletons that support their body to help them conserve energy and avoid straining when carrying heavy loads. For example, in 2017, Lowe's rolled out robotic exosuits with lift-assist technology for store employees. Ford also equips manufacturing workers with exoskeletons, and Audi, Gammon, and the US Navy are using or evaluating the tech, the report noted.

 

This technology is particularly useful for aging workers, the report noted, as it can help workers avoid overexertion and injuries.

SEE: Wearable Device Policy (Tech Pro Research)

2. Augmenting vision

AR and VR are increasingly being adopted in the enterprise for training, as well as collaboration and productivity purposes. Offering instructions directly in a worker's field of view can help them work faster and better, augment their design and data analysis abilities, and improve collaboration with other team members, the report stated.

GE Aviation workers use smart glasses to offer mechanics instructions, which has improved efficiency by 8% to 12% while reducing errors, according to the report. And Coca-Cola technicians use smart glasses to share visuals with experts off-site to get their input, reducing delays and costs.

3. Empowering speech and hearing

Hearables and voice-controlled wearables can offer workers instant, hands-free access to instructions and other information with the ease of speaking to increase efficiency, the report stated.

For example, Lufthansa uses voice-based headphones that allow one technician to accomplish maintenance work that previously required two, as one would have to read out instructions. With the wearable, the maintenance checklist is converted to voice commands, which the technician can respond to and record their answers, according to the report.

4. Improving awareness

Wearables can provide faster task and situational awareness to workers, again to increase productivity and work quality. For example, the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport uses smart watches to alert cleaning crews when and where they are needed.

These tools can also improve worker safety by better monitoring the worker's physical status and environmental conditions, and alerting them to when either becomes dangerous, the report noted.

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Future of Cardiology Will Be Defined by Digital, Mobile Advances

Future of Cardiology Will Be Defined by Digital, Mobile Advances | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Three JACC articles examine how new technology will change the prevention and treatment of heart disease

Via Art Jones
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The Use of Artificial Intelligence in Cardiology:  As the type and breadth of data available to cardiologists and the cardiovascular care team continues to grow more sophisticated, physicians are increasingly being asked to provide more rapid and personalized interpretations of data to their patients. One solution to providing this level of personalized medicine efficiently is artificial intelligence, also known as machine learning. researchers analyze select applications of artificial intelligence in cardiology and identify how the specialty could incorporate more artificial intelligence in the future to enhance the capabilities and experiences of clinicians and patients.  “(Artificial intelligence) has clear potential to enhance every stage of patient care — from research and discovery, to diagnosis, to selection of therapy,” said Joel Dudley, Ph.D., senior author of the review and director of the Next Generation Healthcare Institute at Mount Sinai. “A key next step to incorporating artificial intelligence into cardiology is to align available data and technologies with clinical and business use. This way, we can prioritize short-term opportunities and understand gaps in available data or algorithms that are holding back applications of artificial intelligence in areas of high clinical need.”  According to the review, artificial intelligence is currently only performed by those with specialized training, but in the future, these methods will be increasingly easy and widely available. It may eventually be incorporated into day-to-day practice by interacting with electronic health records and billing.

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Art Jones's curator insight, June 6, 3:22 PM

Excerpt: The future of cardiovascular care will be transformed by advances in artificial intelligence, digital health technology and mobile devices as a means to prevent and treat heart disease

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Tag Heuer made a smaller modular smartwatch

Tag Heuer made a smaller modular smartwatch | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Those of us with smaller wrists may have noticed that most of the connected smartwatches out there are, well, kind of huge. Tag Heuer's Connected Modular 45
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It's not just size that matters, here, either. Tag Heuer worked with Intel and Google to create an improved smartwatch, with a brighter screen that displays in 390 X 390 resolution, giving you 326 pixels per inch. The memory capacity is up, too, with 8 GB of storage and 1 GB of RAM included. Similar to the Apple Watch, Tag Heuer's new 41mm model has nine different straps to connect the device to your arm; you can even connect the company's Calibre 5 mechanical watch to the bands if you like. The new smartwatch is water resistant to 50 meters and has GPS and NFC (for Android Pay) connectivity. You can connect it to phones running Android 4.4 or iOS 9 and up. The new model is set to retail starting at $1,200, so start saving your pennies.

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World’s First iPhone Cochlear Implant Sound Processor to Be Presented at Wearable Technology Conference

World’s First iPhone Cochlear Implant Sound Processor to Be Presented at Wearable Technology Conference | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
On December 7 and 8 our first ever WT | Wearable Technologies Conference Australia will be held in Sydney. Besides Kevin White from Collingwood Football Club,
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With the Nucleus 7 Sound Processor, people with a Cochlear Nucleus implant can stream sound directly from a compatible iPhone, iPad and iPod touch directly to their sound processor. They will also be able to control, monitor and customize their hearing on their iPhone or iPod touch through the Nucleus Smart App available from the Apple App Store.  As the world’s first and only Made for iPhone cochlear implant sound processor, the Nucleus 7 Sound Processor makes listening to music in high-quality stereo sound, watching videos and making FaceTime calls — streamed directly to their cochlear implant — easily accessible for wearers. Importantly, the direct streaming also enhances the experience of talking on the phone – something we know is incredibly important for our customers. It is also the smallest and lightest behind-the-ear cochlear implant sound processor available from Cochlear.

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KardiaBand helps the Apple Watch inch closer to becoming a medical device

KardiaBand helps the Apple Watch inch closer to becoming a medical device | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The line between wearable and the real thing is blurring, as the FDA has approved the KardiaBand as a medical accessory for the Apple Watch.
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Available for $199, the KardiaBand is just a band that can be used in place of your current Apple Watch wristband. Located immediately below the Apple Watch is a silver sensor, where you can place your finger for a reading. The Apple Watch will then show results using a familiar line graph (it’s much like the one that Apple Watch already uses to show your heart rate data) and inform users if their heart rate is anything out of the ordinary.

The key to the KardiaBand is AliveCor’s SmartRhythm technology, a new feature within the Apple Watch’s Kardia app. SmartRhythm employs artificial intelligence alongside Apple Watch heart rate and activity sensors to “continuously evaluate the correlation between heart activity and physical activity,” the company noted in a release.  “KardiaBand paired with SmartRhythm technology will be life-changing for people who are serious about heart health,” AliceCor CEO Vic Gundotra said in a statement. “These capabilities will allow people to easily and discreetly check their heart rhythms when they may be abnormal, capturing essential information to help doctors identify the issue and inform a clear path of care to help manage AFib, a leading cause of stroke, and other serious conditions.

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'Smart' fabric could turn your clothes into wearable keycards

'Smart' fabric could turn your clothes into wearable keycards | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Researchers developed a magnetized fabric that can be programmed with passcodes to unlock doors. The technology could one day replace conventional keys.
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From keycards to touchpads, scientists have developed all sorts of alternatives to conventional metal keys. Now researchers at the University of Washington have developed a “smart” fabric that they say can be used to create clothing programmed with the wearer’s identity — making it possible to open doors at home and at work with just the swipe of a shirt cuff. “With our approach we can transform everyday clothes like a shirt into a magnetic hard drive that can store codes and images, and which can be thrown into a washer and dryer without any loss of information,” Justin Chan, a Ph.D. student in computer science and engineering at the university and the lead author of a recent study about the new technology, told NBC News MACH in an email.  For the research, Chan and his colleagues used sewing machines and off-the-shelf conductive thread to create magnetizable embroidery. Then, they used a magnet to "program" sections of the embroidery with positive or negative poles to represent the zeros and ones of digital passcodes. These resulting codes can be read by a magnetometer, an inexpensive sensor that detects magnetic fieldsIn one test, the researchers programmed a shirtsleeve patch with the passcode for an electronic door lock. They were able to unlock the door by swiping the cuff in front of an array of magnetometers affixed to the door.  Chan says the technology is a less expensive alternative to conventional keycards, which store passcodes in radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips that use electromagnetic fields to identify people or objects. “RFID readers can cost hundreds of dollars, whereas each magnetometer can retail for under a dollar,” he told MACH. “You can have a much cheaper reader and be able to read information that’s on your clothes.”

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A prominent LA hospital is using Fitbits to help patients go home sooner

A prominent LA hospital is using Fitbits to help patients go home sooner | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Patients who reach 1,000 steps a day are typically ready to be discharged sooner than those who don't.
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Cedars-Sinai hospital is giving out Fitbit activity trackers to its patients after knee replacements, hip replacements and other surgeries, to encourage them to start walking short distances.  For healthy people, 10,000 steps a day is a typical goal. But the doctors at Cedars-Sinai found that patients that reach even 1,000 steps are usually discharged sooner than those who don't.  "Patients need to walk after they've had a surgery," said Brennan Spiegel, director of health services research at Cedars-Sinai, in an interview with CNBC. "There's decades of research, so we know that."  Spiegel is among the medical professionals who started working with Fitbit as the company expanded beyond the consumer market and into research and clinical studies. Fitbit told CNBC in September that it's unfazed by rivals like Apple and Samsung, in part due to the company's focus on health and medical applications.

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