MOOCs sans arrêt
31 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Diana Morais from MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning
Scoop.it!

MOOCs...Learning is Changing, Curtis J. Bonk

Curtis J. Bonk will deliver a presentation via videoconference at Tampere University of Applied Sciences, http://www.tamk.fi/. The following themes are included in presentation:

- Massive open online courses as part of the higher education.
- The trends of e-learning and educational technology.
- Opportunities and challenges in online learning, blended learning and moocs
- Recommendations and guidelines for design and implementation of MOOCs

Questions and conversation can be seen at Twitter with Hashtag #bonktam15, https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime...

Curtis J. Bonk's presentation slides and streaming & recording link can be found at http://www.trainingshare.com/workshop...

For more information about Curtis J. Bonk http://php.indiana.edu/~cjbonk/


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Miloš Bajčetić, Kim Flintoff
more...
Rescooped by Diana Morais from MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning
Scoop.it!

Position papers for European cooperation on MOOCs


Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Diana Morais from MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning
Scoop.it!

How do you measure the ‘success’ of a MOOC?

How do you measure the ‘success’ of a MOOC? | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it

Here’s a question I’ve been battling for some time .. how do you measure the ‘success’ of a MOOC? The problem is that I haven’t been able to define what the ‘success’ is supposed to be, so to try and measure it seems, well, a pointless exercise...

http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc


Via Lucas Gruez, Kim Flintoff
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Diana Morais from Easy MOOC
Scoop.it!

Designing effective moocs

... This paper has described a twelve dimensional classification schema for MOOCs, which can be used to design, describe and evaluate MOOCs. Five examples of different pedagogical MOOCs have been mapped against the schema....

http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc


Via SusanBat , Miloš Bajčetić, Lucas Gruez
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Diana Morais from Easy MOOC
Scoop.it!

MOOC, COOC: La formation professionnelle à l'ère du digital

MOOC, COOC:  La formation professionnelle à l'ère du digital | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it

 ...Il met en avant quelques idées sur les grandes mutations de la for - mation professionnelle et de l’apprentissage à l’ère du digital. En s’ap - puyant sur une vingtaine d’entretiens auprès de responsables de projets Formation du CAC 40 et d’acteurs français spécialistes du sujet, il ana - lyse en quoi les MOOC et le social learning sont une (r)évolution péda - gogique à suivre, et balaye les défis que les MOOC d’entreprise devront relever ainsi que les grands facteurs clés de succès. Enfin, il présente les plus importantes critiques faites aux MOOC académiques et leur impact dans le monde professionnel ...

 

Un extrait de l'ouvrage  http://medias.dunod.com/document/9782100724673/Feuilletage.pdf

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc


Via Lucas Gruez
more...
Marco Bertolini's curator insight, June 3, 2015 3:25 PM

Mooc et Cooc (en stock) : la révolution de la formation professionnelle est en marche

ruthlessarse's comment, June 4, 2015 1:00 AM
good
HUBMODE's curator insight, August 3, 2015 6:44 AM

Une très bonne synthese des acteurs,outils et principes!Pour préparer votre entreprise a devenir plus agile grace au digital learning.

Rescooped by Diana Morais from Easy MOOC
Scoop.it!

Recommendations on Formative Assessment and Feedback Practices for stronger engagement in MOOCs

...we focus on providing specific research-based recommendations on formative assessment and feedback practices that can advance student activity. In this respect, we analysed some significant research papers on formative assessment and feedback methods applicable to face-to-face teaching environments that advance student engagement, and concluded with related requirements and conditions that can be applied also to MOOCs...

http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc


Via Lucas Gruez
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Diana Morais from Easy MOOC
Scoop.it!

Analyzing MOOCs - A SWOT Analysis

These platforms have gained considerable attention because they either have raised venture capital and/or have been started by very reputable institutions.  When you take a step back and think about this, you have to be somewhat blown away!  Did you ever think you would attend a course put on by Harvard professors?  Now, you can find out for yourself and participate.  It’s amazing how far learning has come.

Now, let’s take a closer look at the ins and outs of MOOCs...

http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc


Via Lucas Gruez
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 7, 2013 3:37 AM

And then Andrew continues his story with an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses MOOCs are characterised by, the opportunities they offer and the threats they face (yes, a SWOT analysis). It is a useful analysis, not because if offers much that MOOC watchers wouldn't know yet, but because it puts these arguments in a neatly organised row. He makes a big thing out of the fact that MOOCs are free and that they are offered by 'extremely reputable schools and professors'.

 

However, I find it curious that under threats or opportunites the effect MOOCs may have on the way higher education is going to be organised, in the first instance in the US but later on also elsewhere, is not mentioned at all. And yet, if MOOCs are going to be disruptive it is in this department. If this is an opportunity or threat I leave to you to decide. (@pbsloep)

Emily Purser's curator insight, February 7, 2013 4:04 AM

and the threats and opportunities of the implications for the potentially largest 'market' of all in this new medium - the students outside the anglosphere...

Rescooped by Diana Morais from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

Analyzing MOOCs - A SWOT Analysis | Andrew Spinner

"One of my many roles at @Understoodit includes conducting onging analysis and research of education technology tools and trends.  One of the most interesting and heavily discussed areas relates to what is known as Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOC for short.  MOOCs are like your typical university style class – a professor, students, homework, and exams.  However, these courses are open to anyone, anywhere in the world, and the majority of them are completely FREE." 

via http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc


Via Lucas Gruez, Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 7, 2013 3:37 AM

And then Andrew continues his story with an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses MOOCs are characterised by, the opportunities they offer and the threats they face (yes, a SWOT analysis). It is a useful analysis, not because if offers much that MOOC watchers wouldn't know yet, but because it puts these arguments in a neatly organised row. He makes a big thing out of the fact that MOOCs are free and that they are offered by 'extremely reputable schools and professors'.

 

However, I find it curious that under threats or opportunites the effect MOOCs may have on the way higher education is going to be organised, in the first instance in the US but later on also elsewhere, is not mentioned at all. And yet, if MOOCs are going to be disruptive it is in this department. If this is an opportunity or threat I leave to you to decide. (@pbsloep)

Emily Purser's curator insight, February 7, 2013 4:04 AM

and the threats and opportunities of the implications for the potentially largest 'market' of all in this new medium - the students outside the anglosphere...

Rescooped by Diana Morais from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

Time to retire from online learning? | Tony Bates, personal blog

Time to retire from online learning? | Tony Bates, personal blog | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it

... I can’t express adequately just how pissed off I am about MOOCs – not the concept, but all the hubris and nonsense that’s been talked and written about them. At a personal level, it was as if 45 years of work was for nothing. All the research and study I and many others had done on what makes for successful learning online were totally ignored, with truly disastrous consequences in terms of effective learning for the vast majority of participants who took MOOCs from the Ivy League universities. Having ignored online learning for nearly 20 years, Stanford, MIT and Harvard had to re-invent online learning in their own image to maintain their perceived superiority in all things higher educational. And the media fell for it, hook, line and sinker. ...


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, April 18, 2014 6:13 AM

The good thing about blogs is that you may be or even are supposed to take a personal stance. Tony Bates certainly does so here, announcing that he will significantly reduce his involvement in the online learning debate.

 

However, the present scoop is not to draw attention to this decision, it is to highlight his heartfelt complaint about the MOOC debates. It is a position I thoroughly sympathize with. There's nothing inherently wrong with the idea of having MOOCs, they are just another shoot on the tree of online learning. MOOCs should also be given credit for drawing wide attention to online learning modes and pointing out that they need not be second choice (whether they are or should be your first choice, all depends on the learning context). However, Tony is absolutely right to point out that the debate is not an academic debate about the vices and virtues of a particular form of (online) learning. Ignoring 30 years of research in online learning and distance education, as the MOOC proponents do, is bad academic practice.

 

So we should continue to research MOOCs, do experiments with them, share experiences. But we should give credit to people such as Tony Bates, who spent the better part of their professional lives carving out MOOC-like concepts of learning and doing the research  to test their viability. I know, this is not what Tony Bates was after in his post, but he (and many others for that matter) do deserve to be given the credits that the MOOC pundits deny him. At their peril, I should add, because a great deal of valuable research results are now lost on them.

@pbsloep

Louise Lewis's curator insight, April 19, 2014 1:30 AM

MOOCs are just another tool in the kit bag - not a new-age online learning phenomenon.  Taken in context, they can be a way of connecting learners, if of course, they are used effectively which includes interactivity and engagement.  Otherwise, they just become simply a duplication of the lecture method online.  Strange that the Ivy League are now espousing that they have created these new wonderful hybrid MOOCs that are engaging.  OMG why didn't they just refer to the world leaders in research eg Bates, Downes, Siemens and others before claiming the all knowing high ground.  Please ......!

Wim Didderen's curator insight, October 9, 2014 6:47 PM

Dragers van onderwijsvernieuwing haken teleurgesteld af  bij de volgende grote sprong ?  (vgl.  Disruptive innovation). Of is hier er iets anders aan de hand ?.

Rescooped by Diana Morais from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

The pedagogy of the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC): the UK view | Siân Bayne and Jen Ross, the Higher Education Academy

The pedagogy of the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC): the UK view  | Siân Bayne and Jen Ross, the Higher Education Academy | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it

The report contains four main sections:

• an overview of the current UK MOOC landscape, illustrating the rich and to date rather neglected history of innovation in open course delivery within the UK during the period preceding our engagement with the large MOOC platforms and the launch of FutureLearn;

• a literature review which addresses key areas of concern within the current published and grey literatures on MOOC pedagogy and associated contextual issues; here we outline what we see as the most important themes currently driving the MOOC pedagogy debate;

• a series of ‘snapshots’ of current UK MOOCs, with an emphasis on looking at the detail of teacher practice, and on approaching the question of MOOC pedagogy from the position of the active teacher-practitioner;

• a conclusion which brings together themes from the literature review with the ‘snapshots’ in order to outline what we consider to be the most pressing issues the UK higher education community should be addressing in relation to MOOC pedagogy.


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 9, 2014 12:26 PM

This is a valuable report, particularly since it doesn’t try to cover everything but focuses on pedagogical issues in particular. Also, the fact that the report limits itself to the UK situation may bother some, but the benefit again is depth. And the UK situation is contrasted with the well-known US MOOC platforms, portraying the UK MOOCs as being European in character. This is exemplified by the pan European OpenupEd platform, which exhibits such European values as equity, quality and diversity. A strong point is the literature review and the in-depth discussion of five exemplary MOOCs. Together, they show that the distinction between cMOOCs and xMOOCs is too simple, meanwhile intermediate and different kinds MOOCs have enriched the MOOC landscape.

 

The report contains a wealth of other interesting facts and views. Although it is of course a mere mark on the developmental timeline of MOOCs, anybody with an interest in their pedagogy should read it. It is time well spent.  @pbsloep

joan gavin's curator insight, March 10, 2014 6:19 AM

Important to remember that MOOCs are designed to give people a "taster" in a particular subject.  They are not intended to replace university degrees.

Rescooped by Diana Morais from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

Invasion of the MOOCs: The Promises and Perils of Massive Open Online Courses | Parlor Press

Invasion of the MOOCs: The Promises and Perils of Massive Open Online Courses | Parlor Press | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it

Invasion of the MOOCs: The Promise and Perils of Massive Open Online Courses is one of the first collections of essays about the phenomenon of “Massive Online Open Courses.” Unlike accounts in the mainstream media and educational press, Invasion of the MOOCs is not written from the perspective of removed administrators, would-be education entrepreneurs/venture capitalists, or political pundits. Rather, this collection of essays comes from faculty who developed and taught MOOCs in 2012 and 2013, students who participated in those MOOCs, and academics and observers who have first hand experience with MOOCs and higher education. These twenty-one essays reflect the complexity of the very definition of what is (and what might in the near future be) a “MOOC,” along with perspectives and opinions that move far beyond the polarizing debate about MOOCs that has occupied the media in previous accounts. Toward that end, Invasion of the MOOCs reflects a wide variety of impressions about MOOCs from the most recent past and projects possibilities about MOOCs for the not so distant future.


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Beth Dailey's curator insight, March 31, 2014 7:11 AM

Great collection of essays on MOOCs.

Theophilus's curator insight, April 3, 2014 3:49 AM

Great lessons to learn for our South African Higher Education institutions who are embarking on e-learning and online-course alternatives. We do not have to commit the same mistakes.

Paul Carey's curator insight, April 3, 2014 4:32 AM

The real story of moocs perhaps?

http://www.parlorpress.com/pdf/invasion_of_the_moocs.pdf

Rescooped by Diana Morais from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

Analyzing MOOCs - A SWOT Analysis | Andrew Spinner

"One of my many roles at @Understoodit includes conducting onging analysis and research of education technology tools and trends.  One of the most interesting and heavily discussed areas relates to what is known as Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOC for short.  MOOCs are like your typical university style class – a professor, students, homework, and exams.  However, these courses are open to anyone, anywhere in the world, and the majority of them are completely FREE." 

via http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc


Via Lucas Gruez, Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 7, 2013 3:37 AM

And then Andrew continues his story with an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses MOOCs are characterised by, the opportunities they offer and the threats they face (yes, a SWOT analysis). It is a useful analysis, not because if offers much that MOOC watchers wouldn't know yet, but because it puts these arguments in a neatly organised row. He makes a big thing out of the fact that MOOCs are free and that they are offered by 'extremely reputable schools and professors'.

 

However, I find it curious that under threats or opportunites the effect MOOCs may have on the way higher education is going to be organised, in the first instance in the US but later on also elsewhere, is not mentioned at all. And yet, if MOOCs are going to be disruptive it is in this department. If this is an opportunity or threat I leave to you to decide. (@pbsloep)

Emily Purser's curator insight, February 7, 2013 4:04 AM

and the threats and opportunities of the implications for the potentially largest 'market' of all in this new medium - the students outside the anglosphere...

Rescooped by Diana Morais from Learning with MOOCs
Scoop.it!

MOOCs in China are growing

MOOCs in China are growing | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it
Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) refer to any online learning or use of education technologies. In China, a country of 1.4 billion people, these are growing. The Chinese government expects MOOCs to bring “revolutionary” change to the education system by reducing inequity in quality of education between urban and rural schools and by sharing the best teaching resources. One of the government’s goals is to train 13 million k-12 (“k-12” is the sum of primary and secondary school years) teachers

Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Diana Morais from MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning
Scoop.it!

The State of the MOOC

The State of the MOOC | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it
So after a couple of years since MOOCs become a recognized eLearning strategy (and for the sake of our readers, I’ll suppose you know what generally defines a MOOC), where do they stand? Still the possible future of education? Still a developing concept? Or perhaps a failed experiment?

I’ll stand in the middle, aligning myself with ‘developing concept’, as there is promise, hype, and both encouraging and discouraging results.

Via Miloš Bajčetić, Kim Flintoff
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Diana Morais from Opening up education
Scoop.it!

Shall We MOOC? A SWOT Analysis at the Program Level

Shall We MOOC? A SWOT Analysis at the Program Level | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it

Via Robert Schuwer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Diana Morais from Easy MOOC
Scoop.it!

Understanding the MOOC Landscape and Its Impact on Libraries' Digital Resources

An ALCTS webinar. MOOCs are forcing us to rethink how we teach, learn, and provide educational resources...

http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc


Via Lucas Gruez
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Diana Morais from Easy MOOC
Scoop.it!

Évaluation par les pairs dans les MOOCs : qu’en dit la littérature ?

Évaluation par les pairs dans les MOOCs : qu’en dit la littérature ? | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it

 ...la mise en place de cette évaluation soulève de nombreuses questions : comment le procédé de correction et de notation fonctionne-t-il et est-il réellement efficace ? L’évaluation d’un apprenant peut-elle vraiment se substituer à celle d’un enseignant, d’un expert ? Comment peut-on inciter les apprenants à évaluer leurs pairs ? Quels retours d’expériences en a-t-on ? Ce dossier propose une sélection d’articles de recherche rassemblés dans le cadre de la veille uTOP sur la thématique de la correction par les pairs.

http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc


Via Lucas Gruez
more...
Lucas Gruez's curator insight, June 5, 2015 3:48 PM

Il semblerait que ce soit le dernier numéro de cette newsletter particulièrement bien faite. Merci aux auteurs pour leur travail de veille et de partage!

finkxenon's comment, June 6, 2015 3:11 AM
marvelous...
Rescooped by Diana Morais from Easy MOOC
Scoop.it!

Retrouvez facilement les articles en français

Pour accéder en 2 clics aux contenus francophones du scoop it Easy-MOOC, cliquez  dans la barre grise ci-dessus sur le symbole en forme d'entonnoir, puis sur le tag Fr.
Bonne lecture!


Via Lucas Gruez
more...
shrikewolds's comment, June 30, 2015 1:35 AM
Very good
LoisCortez's curator insight, July 3, 2015 1:05 AM

great

cantatapledge's comment, July 3, 2015 6:35 AM
Superior
Rescooped by Diana Morais from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

MOOCs in education - MOOC en la educación | various authors - Comunicar

MOOCs in education - MOOC en la educación | various authors - Comunicar | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it

Comunicar is a open journal, originating at the Open University of Cataluña, that publishes articles on media education. The current issue, 44, contains a special section featuring ten articles on MOOCs. Articles are available in Spanish and English.


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Diana Morais from European MOOCs. Research and news.
Scoop.it!

Language MOOCs: Providing Learning, Transcending Boundaries

Language MOOCs: Providing Learning, Transcending Boundaries | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it

Via ECO Project EU
more...
ECO Project EU's curator insight, June 10, 2015 6:22 AM

Open access book about language MOOCs with interesting articles about methodological design, role of instructors, and accessibility among other topics connected to this kind of MOOCs.

Rescooped by Diana Morais from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

MOOC Completion and Retention in the Context of Student Intent | Justin Reich - EDUCAUSE Review online

MOOC Completion and Retention in the Context of Student Intent | Justin Reich - EDUCAUSE Review online | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it

MOOC critics are concerned about low overall completion rates, but these rates are typically evaluated without accounting for student intentions.This study, based on survey and log data from nine HarvardX courses, investigates how completion and attrition rates differ based on students' self-reported intentions about course participation.The study found that, on average among survey respondents, 22 percent of students who intended to complete a course earned a certificate, compared with 6 percent of students who intended to browse a course.Efforts to personalize MOOCs based on self-reported intentions should be conducted with care: many students who do not intend to complete a MOOC do so, and most who do intend to complete a MOOC are not successful.


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:56 AM

Yet another article to discuss MOOC dropout rates, and a very sensible one at that. Justin Reich first asks MOOC participants for their intention to participate and then measures drop out rates per intention group (he calls it 'stop out' to avoid the negative connotation associated with drop out). This instantly doubles the often found retention rate of 10% to 22% Also, a non-negligible group of participants who did not intend to sit out the entire MOOC in the first place, earned themselves a certificate after all. This is an interesting finding as it shows how a MOOC may be able to stir ambitions that weren't there to begin with. Think intrinsic motivation, something difficult to come by in education.

 

Of course, 22% is stil a low relative number, but with large numbers enrolling it still boils down to sizeable absolute numbers. Add to this the 'accidental completers' - those who did not intend to get a certificate but still did - and you begin to see where MOOCs could go: not replacing ordinary university courses, but a means for universities to take seriously their responsibility to society to disseminate their knowledge widely. The gain is a better educated populace at relatively low costs @pbsloep

Rescooped by Diana Morais from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

University of London MOOC Report | Barney Grainger, U. London


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Manuel León Urrutia's curator insight, March 2, 2014 12:28 PM

Another MOOC report, this time from University of London. Section 6 specially interesting for MOOC making. 

luiy's curator insight, April 15, 2014 6:21 PM

Project Planning a MOOC

 

The course teams involved with our MOOCs included experienced academics with familiarity in developing materials on a learning platform. Nonetheless, for each of them it was their first experience of MOOCs, as it was for the project planning team.

 

 

Delivering a MOOC

 

A range of styles and learning methods were adopted by the four MOOCs, appropriate to the subject matter covered. A MOOC structure of six weeks and 5-10 student effort hours per week of study appeared to be just right for the majority of students (55%). Some considerations for future delivery include:

 

< Well designed announcements at the beginning and end of each week that articulate with the topic coverage, learning activities and assessment methods can be effective at maintaining student interest and motivation.


< Management of forum threads and posts is a critical factor in dealing with massive scale short courses to ensure the majority of students are not affected negatively by the behaviour of a small number of the community, while preserving the openness of the discussion areas.

 

< The Coursera platform tools are significant and comprehensive in terms of plotting overall student activity, allowing evaluation of assessment data, as well as usage statistics on video resources and other learning activities; however, further refinement of these tools to enable both students and teaching staff to understand their progression at an individual level is necessary (and underway).



** Learning Resource Development


 


María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, May 20, 2014 5:22 AM

University of London MOOC Report .

I Barney Gracinger, U. London

Rescooped by Diana Morais from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

A Comparison of Five Free MOOC Platforms for Educators

A Comparison of Five Free MOOC Platforms for Educators | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it
There are a number of good options for educators looking to build their own MOOCs. Here is a look at five of the most interesting platforms.

Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 10, 2014 5:21 AM

Don’t expect a thorough report, this is just a one page overview ticking off such items as maximum class size,  the availability of custom analytics, and the ability to host yourself. The platforms are edX, moodle, course sites, udemy and versal. Each one is briefly discussed. The value of the list is that it allows adventurous teachers to try out a MOOC course of their own making. Institutions will want a more extensive list. Finally, ‘free’ here means ‘gratis’ (no money changes hands), not ‘open’ (as in with an open license).  @pbsloep

Rescooped by Diana Morais from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

Investigating MOOCs through blog mining | Yong Chen | The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning

Investigating MOOCs through blog mining | Yong Chen | The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning | MOOCs sans arrêt | Scoop.it

Abstract: MOOCs (massive open online course) is a disruptive innovation and a current buzzword in higher education. However, the discussion of MOOCs is disparate, fragmented, and distributed among different outlets. Systematic, extensively published research on MOOCs is unavailable. This paper adopts a novel method called blog mining to analyze MOOCs. The findings indicate, while MOOCs have benefitted learners, providers, and faculty who develop and teach MOOCs, challenges still exist, such as questionable course quality, high dropout rate, unavailable course credits, ineffective assessments, complex copyright, and limited hardware. Future research should explore the position of MOOCs and how it can be sustained.


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, May 2, 2014 8:53 AM

The introduction to the article sometimes paints perhaps too simplistic a picture (such as that the xMOOCs and cMOOCs exhaust the universe of possible MOOCs; cf my recent scoop in early March: http://sco.lt/8FAEJl) or a somewhat trite one (“MOOCs represents an emerging methodology of online teaching and an important development in open education.”). Still the article is an interesting contribution to  MOOC research for the methodology it employs: text mining and analysis of blogs on MOOCs. Language technologies - in this case concept analysis and mapping using leximancer - are a powerful means to crunch large amounts of textual data, often revealing patters that are not immediately apparent to the naked eye. The value of the article therefore does not lie in its introduction, but in the results and ensuing discussion. 

 

Chen summarises the results under the headings of benefits for learners, benefits for providers, and trends, concluding with a discussion of the limitations of his study. His conclusions are not earth shattering, but how could they? After all, this is a mere summary of what he came across in the 360 blog posts he analysed with the help of leximancer; it is not a position paper in any sense, at best it is a kind of meta-analysis. To put it differently, tongue in cheek, there’s no need to go through the 431 scoops I collected on these pages to get an impression of what has been discussed about MOOCs in blogs over the last 4 odd years. Read the article and you have a fair idea. And then you should go to individual blog posts to collect opinions. @pbsloep