MOOCs and the librarian
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MOOCs and the librarian
Constructing an understanding of MOOCs, ed. leadership, and libraries
Curated by J Pickett
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The Direction of MOOC Research

The Direction of MOOC Research | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it
After 2 years of MOOC mania, the time has come for increasing the output of MOOC research. But what direction is that research taking – what direction should it take? At the beginning of the month ...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Abi James's curator insight, December 19, 2013 3:43 AM

Mooc research needs to consider inckusion - how to include those excluded from traditional university study particularly those with disabilities and accessibility needs. so far we are struggling to capture their needs and requirements. 

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MOOC Quality Project

MOOC Quality Project | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it
An EFQUEL site
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a 12-week course about the pedagogy of MOOCs:  "perspectives on quality of MOOC-based education"

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The Professors Behind the MOOC Hype

The Professors Behind the MOOC Hype | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it
In the largest survey of instructors who have taught massive open online courses, The Chronicle heard from critics, converts, and the cautious.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Cato Unbound » Blog Archive » Why Online Education Works

Cato Unbound » Blog Archive » Why Online Education Works | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it

A historical perspective on education and distance, ed, and a discussion of why "stasis in methods has led to stasis in status."

 

"Online teaching and MOOCs are not the same thing. In many ways they are antithetical."

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Free university courses go global

Free university courses go global | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it
Platforms offering learning university education online are drawing thousands of students – and offer potential to reshape higher education.
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In a MOOC, you can eliminate the teacher factor | Coordination Régionale PACA

Inge Ignatia de Waard:

 

What is a MOOC?
A MOOC is a massive open online course, which means it’s a course format that has a lot of social media in it. It is based on a lot of dialogue, on discussions, on connecting to each other. There is currently a heavy debate about what is really a MOOC because the first MOOCs were connectivist MOOCs from George Siemens and Stephen Downes, focusing on peer-to-peer interactions at their centre. In one of their courses – the CCK2008, the name actually arouse. Now, platforms like Udacity and Coursera are hosting courses but this type of MOOCs are much more behaviourist, or more teacher oriented. So there’s a debate between these two types of MOOCs and their approaches.

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Amanda Ripley : Blog : College is Dead. Long Live College!

Amanda Ripley : Blog : College is Dead. Long Live College! | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it
Amanda Ripley, reporter for Time Magazine and author of The Unthinkable - Who Survives When Disaster Strikes - and Why, blogs about the book, the content, and her work.
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1st "BOOC" on Scaling-Up What Works about to start at Indiana University

1st "BOOC" on Scaling-Up What Works about to start at Indiana University | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it
I talked with Dan Hickey about this -- it's an interesting alternative to MOOCs, and the topic is relevant for this blog. In the fall semester of 2013, IU School of Education Researcher and Associa...
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a BOOC:  "big" open online course, an experiment in scaling up from 25-seat classes to a more modest (compared to 5,000) 500 student course. 

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The underlying inequality of MOOCs | OEB Newsportal

The underlying inequality of MOOCs | OEB Newsportal | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it

In a recent opinion piece written for the Observer, Anant Agarwal, president of leading MOOC provider edX, claimed that “anyone with an Internet connection can have access” to higher education. “MOOCs = access” is a concept that needs to be interrogated carefully: it cannot just be assumed that because something exists and because it is ‘free’, it is equally accessible to all people. There are a variety of mitigating factors that limit access to MOOCs, many of which are the same as those that also exclude disadvantaged groups from traditional educational models and stem from financial, geographical and educational disparity.

 

In practical terms, sustained participation in a MOOC requires a set of resources and infrastructure that is a privilege, as many of us, including Agarwal, often forget. A reliable electricity supply, frequent and uninterrupted access to a device capable of going online and playing video and sound, and a secure, unrestricted Internet connection are essential starting blocks – as is a safe and comfortable space in which to learn. A recently published paper on the experiences of learners using non-personal computers to access online learning resources in Sri Lanka found that local telecentres often restricted access to high-bandwidth sites, such as YouTube, which often form a core part of MOOC resources.

 

Limited access to these practical resources is not just an issue in the developing world. There are many groups within OECD countries which are equally disadvantaged by the ‘digital divide’, be it those in temporary or communal accommodation, the elderly, rural communities, those reliant on welfare or those living on low incomes. Additional issues arise for those with disabilities, including visual and hearing impairment, who may require specialised technologies to make use of any online learning application.


Via Miloš Bajčetić
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The Problem with MOOCs: Through the Eyes of a UX Designer | EdReach

“…simply making information available is not enough.”


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Brainstorm in Progress: What Part of MOOC Don't You Understand?

Brainstorm in Progress: What Part of MOOC Don't You Understand? | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it

[Brainstorm in Progress

Geoff Cain explores education, elearning, open education resources, open textbooks, massively open online courses (MOOCs) and social networks. Join the conversation!]

 

     "Educators who have not taken a MOOC (Massively Open Online Course) and do not understand their history, are currently writing about these courses which is causing them to be inaccurately represented in the press. The main problem is there is all the publicity around Coursera and Edx that ignores other kinds of MOOCs."

 

(Written by a participant in the first MOOC initiated by George Siemens and Stephen Downes, "Connectivism and Connective Knowledge 2008" was one of the most interactive and engaging experiences in my education."

 

"The reason why we wanted a class with a lot of people is because we learn in those networks - we get to take advantage of the the collective knowledge and talents of thousands of people. If your MOOC doesn't do that, you might not be in a "class."

 

See references at end of article.


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StraighterLine's comment, November 27, 2012 9:16 AM
Interesting point. Some MOOCs (us included) already solved some of the problems Couersera and Edx face such as proving college credit for the online college courses.
plerudulier's comment, November 27, 2012 11:40 AM
Proving college credit to enter online college courses as well as accreditation of attended online courses are and will be points to seriously address if MOOCs (whatever their kinds, xMOOCs or cMOOCs) want to 'challenge' traditional formats.
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A True History of the MOOC ~ Stephen's Web

A True History of the MOOC ~ Stephen's Web | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it
Stephen's Web, the home page of Stephen Downes, with news and information on e-learning, new media, instructional technology, educational design, and related subjects...
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Half an Hour: International MOOCs Past and Present

Half an Hour: International MOOCs Past and Present | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it
RT @Downes: International MOOCs Past and Present - Please help me fill out this list: http://t.co/A7hD2wTi add comment, tweet or email stephen@downes.ca...
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MOOCs on the Move: How Coursera Is Disrupting the Traditional Classroom - Knowledge@Australian School of Business

MOOCs on the Move: How Coursera Is Disrupting the Traditional Classroom - Knowledge@Australian School of Business | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it
Knowledge@Australian School of Business is a new online resource that offers regularly updated business insights, information and research from a variety of sources.
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'Conventional' online universities consider strategic response to MOOCs | Inside Higher Ed

'Conventional' online universities consider strategic response to MOOCs  | Inside Higher Ed | MOOCs and the librarian | Scoop.it

Online education not only gave nontraditional students a chance to enroll in collegiate programs from afar; it has also given universities that historically have not enjoyed the prestige of the Ivies a chance to build a reputation on fresh territory and build reliable revenue streams.

 

But, now that higher education’s traditional heavyweights are creating online courses and offering them for free to anyone who wants to register, those universities that have made names for themselves in the market for “conventional” online programs are trying to sort out how these high-profile “MOOCs” (i.e., Massive Open Online Courses) could affect their own positions in an online market where many have staked their futures.

 

 

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