Moocs
159 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dominik Lukes from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

On why xMOOCs can't be exported, by Dheeraj Sanghi

Would MOOCs enrich higher education in India, could it replace existing courses?, is the question discussed here by Dheeraj Sanghi. In other words, do MOOCs pose a threat to existing Higher Ed. institutions in India (and similar countries)? Although the ulitemate answer is 'no', the argument is interesting. Dheeraj Sanghi first acknowledges that "A course by an excellent professor in a good university in some part of the world even in an online mode is likely better than the corresponding course offered in an average engineering college in the country, even though latter is a face-to-face communication." To me, this sounds quite disconcerting. So, in principle, a Stanford MOOC on AI beats your average course elsewhere.

But _in practice_ , the argument continues, such a replacement won't work because of language issues, lack of writing skills to particpate in fora, difference in course content, differing regulations. Dheeraj Sanghi concludes that MOOCs have their use, but for lifelong learning scenarios only.

What strikes me is his admitting that _in principle_ the MOOC is a better course, but that for _practical reasons_  it won't work. As indicated, I find this quite disconcerting. Has the added benefit of teacher interaction become this low? Or should we as academics put more effort in creating OERs? And how about the students? Will they rest content with this status quo or develop their own ideas about how useful MOOCs are, perhaps urging their teachers (or educational systems) to improve? If MOOCs are the in-principle favorite because of their ancestry, that sounds ominous for the state of higher eduation.


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 7, 2013 4:26 PM

Would MOOCs enrich higher education in India, could it replace existing courses?, is the question discussed here by Dheeraj Sanghi. In other words, do MOOCs pose a threat to existing Higher Ed. institutions in India (and similar countries)? Although the ultemate answer is 'no', the argument is interesting. Dheeraj Sanghi first acknowledges that "A course by an excellent professor in a good university in some part of the world even in an online mode is likely better than the corresponding course offered in an average engineering college in the country, even though latter is a face-to-face communication." To me, this sounds quite disconcerting. So, in principle, a Stanford MOOC on AI beats your average course elsewhere.

But _in practice_ , the argument continues, such a replacement won't work because of language issues, lack of writing skills to participate in fora, difference in course content, differing regulations. Dheeraj Sanghi concludes that MOOCs have their use, but for lifelong learning scenarios only.

What strikes me is his admitting that _in principle_ the MOOC is a better course, but that for _practical reasons_  it won't work. As indicated, I find this quite disconcerting. Has the added benefit of teacher interaction become this low? Or should we as academics put more effort in creating OERs? And how about the students? Will they rest content with this status quo or develop their own ideas about how useful MOOCs are, perhaps urging their teachers (or educational systems) to improve? If MOOCs are the in-principle favorite because of their ancestry, that sounds ominous for the state of higher eduation. (@pbsloep)

Rescooped by Dominik Lukes from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

MOOCs: neither the death of the university nor a panacea for learning by Jane Den Hollander

MOOCs: neither the death of the university nor a panacea for learning by Jane Den Hollander | Moocs | Scoop.it

"Over the last few months most of us who work in higher education, as well as those who watch and comment on what we do have been fascinated by a singular topic: the MOOC. [...] They are very new, and no-one yet knows what they will mean or what role they will play. But many already believe that Pandora’s box has been opened. [...] For the first time in our existence, some are questioning the university’s purpose and future. [...] Clearly MOOCs are not the panacea, or a replacement, but they do contribute to a worldwide learning community, hungry to learn and engage with others who wish to do likewise."

 


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominik Lukes
Scoop.it!

Good MOOC’s, Bad MOOC’s

Good MOOC’s, Bad MOOC’s | Moocs | Scoop.it
So I just finished a brief radio appearance (CBC) on the subject of Massive Open, Online Courses (MOOCs). The main guest was George Siemens who, with Stephen Downes, helped pioneer these courses in Canada.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominik Lukes
Scoop.it!

Using Vygotsky to Understand Connectivism: Proximity and Duration

Using Vygotsky to Understand Connectivism: Proximity and Duration | Moocs | Scoop.it
Vygotsky divides the idea of development into two developmental levels: a potential developmental level and a completed developmental level. Starting at the potential developmental level a learner ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dominik Lukes from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

Brainstorm in Progress: Nine Essential MOOC Links by Geoff Cain

Brainstorm in Progress: Nine Essential MOOC Links by Geoff Cain | Moocs | Scoop.it

A handy list of URLs compiled by Geoff Cain on MOOCs. 


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 7, 2013 4:23 PM

A handy list of URLs compiled by Geoff Cain on MOOCs. 

Scooped by Dominik Lukes
Scoop.it!

The March of the MOOCs: Monstrous Open Online Courses | Open Education | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

The March of the MOOCs: Monstrous Open Online Courses | Open Education | HYBRID PEDAGOGY | Moocs | Scoop.it
Hybrid Pedagogy is an academic and networked journal of teaching and technology that combines the strands of critical and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses of technology and digital media in education.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominik Lukes
Scoop.it!

Pinning the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Curation, and ...

Pinning the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Curation, and ... | Moocs | Scoop.it

I am a self diagnosed Digital History Hoarder so I collect links and sites and magazine articles and all manner of images, tidbits, trivia and show-and-tell items to share in class. Those bits and pieces I bring in and share with students keep classes current and allow me to demonstrate connections from past to present and from discipline to discipline.

more...
No comment yet.