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Brain size may determine whether you are good at keeping friends

Brain size may determine whether you are good at keeping friends | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Researchers are suggesting that there is a link between the number of friends you have and the size of the region of the brain -- known as the orbital prefrontal cortex -- that is found just above the eyes.
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Mentally ill ‘face violence risk’

Mentally ill ‘face violence risk’ | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Mentally ill people are four times more likely to be a victim of violence, according to an international study.
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Who Am I? The Question of Youth Violence

Who Am I? The Question of Youth Violence | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

"From [a strength-based] perspective, successful development is viewed not as the absence of risk behavior but as the presence of positive attributes that enable youth to reach their full potential as productive and engaged adults.”

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Study: MRI reveals brain function differs in math-phobic children

Children who get anxious about doing math have brain function that differs from children who don’t, with math-specific fear interfering with the parts of the brain involved in problem-solving, according to functional MRI (fMRI) scans of 7- to 9-year-olds. This doesn't mean they can't become good at math, but the associated anxiety is neurobiologically similar to other kinds of anxiety or phobias, "even  generalized anxiety disorders in adults," write the authors.


Via Tom Perran
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How to Land Your Kid in Therapy

How to Land Your Kid in Therapy | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

"'Happiness as a byproduct of living your life is a great thing . . . but happiness as a goal is a recipe for disaster.' It’s precisely this goal, though, that many modern parents focus on obsessively—only to see it backfire."


Via Rachelle Capo
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Bouncing Back: Relationships as the Core of Resilience

Bouncing Back: Relationships as the Core of Resilience | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Parent-infant attachment is crucial to the development of the areas of the brain that foster resilience and the success of future family relationships.

Via Rachelle Capo
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The Reading Brain: How Your Brain Helps You Read, and Why it Matters

The Reading Brain: How Your Brain Helps You Read, and Why it Matters | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
It’s never too early to set a child on the pathway to becoming a strong reader. And it’s never too late to help a struggling reader strengthen his or her brain to read more successfully and with greater enjoyment.

Via Tom Perran
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Share a Story - Shape a Future: Readers Take Heart: Yes, You Are a Reader

Share a Story - Shape a Future: Readers Take Heart: Yes, You Are a Reader | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

We read every day without thinking about it ... just like breathing! In this post, you'll find five ways that we model reading for kids, just by going about our day!


Via Terry Doherty, Jerry de Gier
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Self Regulation: Teaching Children The Art of Self-Control

Self Regulation: Teaching Children The Art of Self-Control | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
The most important skill parents can give children is the ability to regulate thoughts, emotions and behavior. Self control is crucial to success.
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marcialynncollum's comment, March 21, 2012 11:59 AM
So true!
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Khan Academy: The future of education?

Khan Academy: The future of education? | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

With the backing of Gates and Google, Khan Academy and its free online educational videos are moving into the classroom and across the world. Their goal: to revolutionize how we teach and learn. Sanjay Gupta reports.


Via Kelly Hulme
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7 Steps to Becoming a Happy Person Others Wants to Be Around

7 Steps to Becoming a Happy Person Others Wants to Be Around | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Complaining about others hurts you in more ways than you can imagine. Fortunately, you can change this and become a person other seek out and want to be around.

Via Rachelle Capo
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Feeding your baby on demand 'may contribute to higher IQ'

Feeding your baby on demand 'may contribute to higher IQ' | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
A new study suggests that babies who are breast-fed or bottle-fed to a schedule do not perform academically as well at school as their demand-fed peers. Dr Maria Iacovou, who led the research from ISER, said: "At this stage, we must be very cautious about claiming a causal link between feeding patterns and IQ. We cannot definitively say why these differences occur, although we do have a range of hypotheses. This is the first study to explore this area and more research is needed to understand the processes involved."
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Gina Stepp's comment, March 21, 2012 10:22 AM
I wonder if it has something to do with the fact that the need-response interactions between mothers and children help self-regulation? (See self-regulation articles on this page). This isn't a huge leap. Self-regulation is also associated with higher IQ scores.
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Child-Proofing Drugs | The Scientist

Child-Proofing Drugs | The Scientist | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
When children need medications, getting the dosing and method of administration right is like trying to hit a moving target with an untried weapon.
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Rescooped by Gina Stepp from Insight and Understanding
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The Psychopath Test | This American Life

The Psychopath Test | This American Life | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

This American Life: "Recently we heard about this test that could determine if someone was a psychopath. So, naturally, our staff decided to take it. This week we hear the results. Plus Jon Ronson asks the question: is this man a psychopath?"

 

Link to transcript, though I strongly recommend listening over reading when it comes to This American Life:  http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/436/transcript

 

(Note: Even though This American Life has only recently heard about the test, the PCL-R has actually been around a good long while. See the author's site for cautions, etc: http://www.hare.org/scales/pclr.html)


Via Seth Capo
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Seth Capo's comment, March 27, 2012 12:24 PM
Some of problems you raised are addressed throughout the episode--in particular, the use of the PCL-R in a criminal justice context and the inherent subjectivity involved in rating responses. I hope you enjoy it, Gina.
Gina Stepp's comment, March 27, 2012 12:31 PM
I look forward to listening to this, although one can't help but cringe when people start playing office games with diagnostic tests and/or relying on them for life-and-death decisions. The PCL-R can be especially problematic as a parlor game, because there's so much dissension over how to classify and/or reclassify the current disorders impacted by the traits it identifies. The APA doesn't list psychopathy as a disorder in the current diagnostic manual--it's really considered a set of traits associated with Antisocial Personality Disorder, more than a separate disorder at this point, but Robert Hare (who developed the test) would like to see it included in the next revised version of the DSM. The manual used by the WHO lists "dissocial personality disorder" which is seen as basically the same thing as psychopathy or sociopathy. But the APA doesn't quite see antisocial personality as perfectly synonymous. Still~ I expect this will be interesting to listen to~
Gina Stepp's comment, March 27, 2012 1:23 PM
Okay. I took the quick way out and read the transcript. :) A much more engaging way of learning about the PCL-R than the way I had to do it in school. But I also thought they did a good job making the point about its limitations. I did have a good chuckle at the end.
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Annie Murphy Paul: What we learn before we're born | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Pop quiz: When does learning begin? Answer: Before we are born. Science writer Annie Murphy Paul talks through new research that shows how much we learn in the womb -- from the lilt of our native language to our soon-to-be-favorite foods.

Via Jerry de Gier, David Hulme
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Gina Stepp's comment, March 29, 2012 11:40 AM
Via @Dan Cloer, too--as he's the one who originally sent me the link a couple of months ago. :)
David Hulme's comment, March 29, 2012 11:42 AM
Thanks!
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How Our Brains Make Memories

How Our Brains Make Memories | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Surprising new research about the act of remembering may help people with post-traumatic stress disorder.


Via Seth Capo
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Taking Timeouts to Decrease Stress and Increase Creativity - Huffington Post

Taking Timeouts to Decrease Stress and Increase Creativity - Huffington Post | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Taking Timeouts to Decrease Stress and Increase CreativityHuffington PostWhen you're tired you don't think as clearly or creatively, and you can make more mistakes.

Via donhornsby
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David Hulme's comment, April 1, 2012 3:17 PM
many thanks
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Brain Differences Seen at 6 Months in Infants Who Develop Autism

Brain Differences Seen at 6 Months in Infants Who Develop Autism | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Researchers have found significant differences in brain development in infants as young as six months old who later develop autism, compared with babies who don’t develop the disorder.
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Flavonoids linked to improved mental health

Flavonoids linked to improved mental health | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

A diet rich in flavonoids, compounds in fruit, vegetables, coffee, tea and chocolate [oh, and let's not forget red wine] could reduce the decline in mental function associated with age, says a new study from France.

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Your Morning Routine Is Making You Dull | TIME Ideas | TIME.com

Your Morning Routine Is Making You Dull | TIME Ideas | TIME.com | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Brrriiinnng. The alarm clock buzzes in another hectic weekday morning. You leap out of bed, rush into the shower, into your clothes and out the door with barely a moment to think. A stressful commute gets your blood pressure climbing.

 

Everything about the way we start our day runs counter to the best conditions for thinking creatively

 


Via Katherine Stevens
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Gina Stepp's comment, March 22, 2012 10:50 AM
I love the last line: "Laughing babies and a double latte: now that’s a way to start the day."

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Neuroscience from Annie Murphy Paul: Your Brain on Fiction

Neuroscience from Annie Murphy Paul:  Your Brain on Fiction | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Brain scans are revealing what happens in our heads when we read a detailed description, an evocative metaphor or an emotional exchange between characters. Stories, this research is showing, stimulate the brain and even change how we act in life.
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Gina Stepp's comment, March 22, 2012 1:57 AM
While it doesn't really have anything to do with the article (other than the connection to fiction) I love this illustration. It's from a children's book by a friend of mine named Eric Anderson. A father of a young daughter, Eric was frustrated that he couldn't find many books to read his daughter that cast "dad" in a supportive role. So he wrote this one: http://www.amazon.com/Alena-Favorite-Thing-Eric-Anderson/dp/0615151531 Every dad should read this with his daughter.
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Attachment: The gift that keeps on giving : UMNews : University of Minnesota

Attachment: The gift that keeps on giving : UMNews : University of Minnesota | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

"Secure attachment means the child is confident—not anxious—about the availability and responsiveness of an adult," says Sroufe. "That confidence is the basis for confidence in oneself and others, and the ability to form adult relationships."

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Daily aspirin 'can stop cancers'

Daily aspirin 'can stop cancers' | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Taking a low dose of aspirin every day can prevent and possibly treat cancer, new evidence published in The Lancet suggests. At the same time, aspirin cut the risk of heart attacks and strokes, but it also increased the risk of a major bleed. However this elevated bleeding risk was only seen in the first few years of aspirin therapy and decreased after that."


(Note: low dose aspirin . . . your stomach lining will thank you if you remember that part!)


Via David Hulme
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David Hulme's comment, March 25, 2012 1:08 PM
many thanks!
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“Indulgent” parents raise better kids?

“Indulgent” parents raise better kids? | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Can you spoil a baby with love? Too much physical affection and warmth?

Do parents breed selfish, anti-social brats by responding promptly to a baby’s cries? By refusing to use corporal punishment on defiant toddlers?

Via Seth Capo
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Self-Control: (a) Innate, or (b) Dependent on Mom and Dad? | Psychology Today

Self-Control: (a) Innate, or (b) Dependent on Mom and Dad? | Psychology Today | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

A recent study has been reported as indicative of inborn capacities for self-control. BIG MISTAKE, says Darcia Narvaez, PhD. It's easy to jump to the incorrect conclusion that self-control is in the genes, but there is much more evidence for an alternative conclusion. What else do children share besides the same genetic material? Yes, of course, the caregiving environment. Here are three examples how self-control capacities are shaped by early caregiving.

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