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Staying resilient through tough economic times

Staying resilient through tough economic times | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

It's about how you think: Making connections, looking for opportunities and other strategies can help foster resilience.

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NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research: K-12 Education

NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research: K-12 Education | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
The NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research is designed to enhance collaboration among the NIH Office of the Director and 15 NIH institutes and centers (ICs) that support research on the nervous system.

Via Roxana Marachi, PhD
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Why Parents Make Awesome Managers

Why Parents Make Awesome Managers | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Parents are often taught not to give into their children’s tantrums. Many workplaces also have their share of highly volatile, yet talented personalities. Managers are challenged when dealing with these types.
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The Only Child: Debunking the Myths

The Only Child: Debunking the Myths | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Only children are supposed to be spoiled, selfish and lonely.

Via Kelly Hulme
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Biography of Alfred Adler: To Heal and to Educate

Biography of Alfred Adler: To Heal and to Educate | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Considered one of the three “great fathers” of modern psychotherapy, Alfred Adler is less familiar to most people than Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung.

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More Than Half of All Cancer Is Preventable: Public Health Researchers Outline Obstacles Standing in the Way of Prevention

More than half of all cancer is preventable, and society has the knowledge to act on this information today, according to Washington University public health researchers at the Siteman Cancer Center in St. Louis, MO. Ironically, one of the obstacles to doing so is skepticism that cancer can be prevented: research focus tends to be treatment rather than prevention.

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» 6 Ways to Slow Down and Save Time - World of Psychology

» 6 Ways to Slow Down and Save Time - World of Psychology | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Moving by the seat of our pants isn’t that helpful for efficiency.
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How to Give Your 7-year-Old Daughter an Eating Disorder? | Psychology Today

How to Give Your 7-year-Old Daughter an Eating Disorder? | Psychology Today | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Did this Tiger Mom go too far? By Pamela Cytrynbaum...
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Non-Progressive Mild Cognitive Impairment: Case Examples 1 | Psychology Today

Non-Progressive Mild Cognitive Impairment: Case Examples 1 | Psychology Today | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Some with mild cognitive impairment do not progress to dementia: Case examples By Douglas Hyde Powell, Ed.D., A.B.P.P....

Via Academic Sciences
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Computer system identifies liars

Computer system identifies liars | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
buffalo.edu - Inspired by the work of psychologists who study the human face for clues that someone is telling a high-stakes lie, UB computer scientists are exploring whether machines can also read the visual cues that give away deceit.
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Smiling through the tears: Study shows how tearjerkers make people happier

Smiling through the tears: Study shows how tearjerkers make people happier | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Tragedy movies like “Titanic” deliver what may seem to be an unlikely benefit: what seems like a negative experience -- watching a sad story -- made people happier by bringing attention to some positive aspects in their own lives.

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Leave It to Science: Does It Pay to Be Beautiful?

Leave It to Science: Does It Pay to Be Beautiful? | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

According to a recent survey of two thousand women, a staggering 25 percent would rather win America’s Next Top Model than a Nobel Prize. Picking beauty over brains might be a bit shallow, but is it also a bad choice? In other words: is being attractive a blessing or a curse?


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Myths of Right-Brained Creativity | Psychology Today

Myths of Right-Brained Creativity | Psychology Today | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

"Myths of hemispheric-centered creativity do more harm than good. We now know that creativity as well as—on the flip side—rational decisions are more whole-brained activities than some of us would like to imagine."

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The Trouble With Bright Girls | Psychology Today

The Trouble With Bright Girls | Psychology Today | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
For women, ability doesn’t always lead to confidence. Here’s why. By Heidi Grant Halvorson, Ph.D. ...

Via Kelly Hulme, Rachelle Capo
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Gina Stepp's comment, March 29, 2012 10:54 PM
The type of praise we give is very important for the right kind of self-image. I do think this is very accurate--we tend to give girls more "global trait" types of praise rather than for effort and mastery. More on this topic here: http://www.vision.org/visionmedia/family-relationships/children-and-self-esteem/34763.aspx
Gina Stepp's comment, March 29, 2012 10:56 PM
So true! The type of praise we give children is very important in helping them develop the right kind of self-image. I do think this is very accurate--we tend to give girls more "global trait" types of praise (especially about beauty) rather than for effort and mastery. More on this topic here: http://www.vision.org/visionmedia/family-relationships/children-and-self-esteem/34763.aspx
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Kids' Cognition Is Changing—Education Will Have to Change With It

Kids' Cognition Is Changing—Education Will Have to Change With It | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
A new survey considers the intellectual future of the millennial generation.

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Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Tom Perran
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Stanford study suggests humans can 'rewire' brains to avoid depression

Stanford study suggests humans can 'rewire' brains to avoid depression | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Stanford psychologists used brain imaging and a video game to help girls teach their brains not to overreact to stress.

The study, which is funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, has been under way for less than a year and builds on peer-reviewed experiments examining risk factors for becoming depressed and the family connections of the disease.


Via Alice Ruxton Abler
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Gina Stepp's comment, March 29, 2012 6:02 PM
The new and interesting thing about this is that they've come up with a video intervention. The rewiring of the brain through positive reframing is a long-practiced part of cognitive behavioral therapy, of course--and there is a large body of research in this area. For some other practical tips on rewiring the brain to avoid depression, a Google Scholar search on building resilience will turn up lots of great studies in this same vein. And some articles like this one: http://www.vision.org/visionmedia/depression-trauma-resilience/5816.aspx
Gina Stepp's comment, March 29, 2012 6:27 PM
More evidence-base for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.
Alice Ruxton Abler's comment, April 8, 2012 5:48 PM
Many thanks!
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Facebook May Not Be So Friendly For Those With Low Self-Esteem : NPR

"People with low self-esteem tend to be very cautious and self-protective," says one of the researchers, psychologist Amanda L. Forest. "It's very important to them to gain others' acceptance and approval." They complain a bit more than everyone else, and they often share their negative views and feelings when face to face with friends and acquaintances. Researchers wondered whether those behavior patterns would hold true online.

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Slips of the Tongue | Psychology Today

Slips of the Tongue | Psychology Today | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Most of us live in fear of unleashing a Freudian slip. Do you?

 

What about the notion that our brain thinks a zillion times faster than our ability to move our mouth? And as such there may be congestion and a slip? AS


Via Academic Sciences
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The psychology of empathy

The psychology of empathy | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

You may not realise it but empathy can make or break your business...

 

[And your other important life arenas, too.]

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'Look at me' toddlers eager to collaborate and learn

'Look at me' toddlers eager to collaborate and learn | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Parents should think twice before brushing off their child's calls to "look at me!" Toddlers whose parents have consistently responded positively to their attention-seeking expect interactions to be fulfilling. As a result, they're eager to collaborate with their parents' attempts to socialize them."

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Genetic risk and stressful early infancy join to increase risk for schizophrenia

Genetic risk and stressful early infancy join to increase risk for schizophrenia | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Working with genetically engineered mice and the genomes of thousands of people with schizophrenia, researchers say they now better understand how both nature and nurture can affect one's risks for schizophrenia and abnormal brain development in general.

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It Wasn’t Me: How to Handle Your Child’s Dishonesty

It Wasn’t Me: How to Handle Your Child’s Dishonesty | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

"Now let’s look at our goals in confronting our child’s dishonesty. First, we want to know the truth and we want for our kids to be able to readily share it. Second, we want for our children to be able to make amends when their behavior affects somebody else, not skirt around the truth and try to get out of taking responsibility for it. Third, we want for our children to be able to learn from their mistakes. If they cannot be honest about those mistakes, then the learning is also lost. . . . so how can we approach lying while keeping those three goals in mind?"


Via Dimitris Agorastos
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Learning best when you rest: Sleeping after processing new info most effective

Learning best when you rest: Sleeping after processing new info most effective | Mom Psych | Scoop.it

Nodding off in class may not be such a bad idea after all. New research shows that going to sleep shortly after learning new material is most beneficial for recall. While this may simply seem to confirm what has been known from earlier studies, "what's novel about this study" say the authors, "is that we tried to shine light on sleep's influence on both types of declarative memory by studying semantically unrelated and related word pairs."



Via David Hulme
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David Hulme's comment, March 27, 2012 11:44 AM
Thanks!
David Hulme's comment, April 1, 2012 9:50 AM
Thnx!
David Hulme's comment, April 1, 2012 9:51 AM
Thanks Tom
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Is popcorn a vegetable?

Is popcorn a vegetable? | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
New research suggests that the fluffy kernels, full of disease-fighting antioxidants, are as healthy as some veggies. Time to give the snack its due?

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Dave Phillipson's comment, March 28, 2012 7:21 PM
Um, who funded the study?

Common sense always says, "follow the money".

I will not be surprised to see that it was funded by a corn company.

Due to the absurdity, I'll Still scoop it.
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Training Working Memory: Why and How | Psychology Today

Training Working Memory: Why and How | Psychology Today | Mom Psych | Scoop.it
Make your working memory work for you. By William R. Klemm, D.V.M, Ph.D....
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Niah Janae Patterson's comment, March 18, 2013 9:34 AM
Good to know to train the mind to hold more memories.