Molecular Breeding Field and Veg crops
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Early morning is the best and only time to exercise. | World of ...

World of interesting facts and useful tips · FactsnTips · About ... Research shows that exercising early in the day, before getting involved in the day's activities, does offer better compliance to an exercise program.
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Plantwise: Impact of white rust of crucifers caused by Albugo candida

Plantwise: Impact of white rust of crucifers caused by Albugo candida | Molecular Breeding Field and Veg crops | Scoop.it

India and Pakistan - Albugo candida has a worldwide distribution but is of significant economic importance only in certain countries on certain crops. India has a huge acreage of susceptible B. juncea and some other oilseed crucifers and is the world's hottest spot for the disease caused by A. candida. The disease is rampant on various crucifers all over India, especially on the oilseed types in the central and northern plains. Saharan and Lakra (1988) and Lakra and Saharan (1989) reported from Haryana, India, that the highest leaf and staghead phase infections in B. juncea cv. Prakash resulted in yield losses of 27.4 and 62.7%, respectively, while the combined infection by these two phases resulted in a yield loss of 89.8%. The various parameters contributing to yield, such as the number of branches/plant, number of siliques/branch, silique length, number of seeds/silique, 1000 grain weight, and total yield/plant were all affected by each category of infection (Saharan and Lakra, 1988; Lakra and Saharan, 1989; Saharan and Verma, 1992).

 

Europe - The disease caused by A. candida appears to be uncommon on spring oilseed rape in Scotland in the UK (Coll et al., 1998). However, high levels of infection by A. candida have been recorded on Brussels sprouts in the UK (Appleton, 1979). Lunaria annua hosts A. candida in Europe in regions such as England (Cromack, 1998), the Netherlands (Mastebroek and Marvin, 2000), and in Crete, Greece (Vakalounakis, 1991). It causes a serious disease of L. annua in Crete and may reduce seed yields in The Netherlands. A. candida also causes an economically important disease of A. rusticana in countries such as Poland (Macias, 1996), Austria (Szith and Furlan, 1979), and Germany (Kalchschmid and Krause, 1976), and of E. sativa in Italy (Minuto et al., 1997). A. candida has also been recently reported on C. sativa from Germany (Föller et al., 1998).

 

North America - In Canada in 1979, A. candida was cited as being the most important pathogen of B. rapa (Verma and Petrie, 1979). In Saskatchewan, Canada, seed yield losses due to the staghead phase during 1970, 1971 and 1972 were estimated to be 0.747 (3%), 1.836 (6%), and 1.08 (9%) million bu, respectively (Petri, 1973). These losses were worth 1.68, 4.13 and 2.43 million dollars, respectively. The estimated yield losses in rapeseed in northern and central Alberta, Canada were 1-2% in 1971 (Berkenkamp, 1972; Saharan and Verma, 1992). In Manitoba, Canada, losses in rapeseed attributed to A. candida in 1971 amounted to 30-60% (Bernier, 1972). During the 1970s the disease on rapeseed rose sharply in severity in the Canadian prairies and yield losses of up to 60% were reported in Saskatchewan, Canada (Saharan and Verma, 1992). However, the disease became unimportant later due to widespread use of resistant cultivars (Petri, 1985a). In 1982, A. candida occurred in 71.4% of B. rapa fields but its incidence of 24.6% was relatively low (Petri, 1985b). Since then, there has been a resurgence of this disease due to the evolution of new races of the pathogen (Petri, 1994). A. candida has also been recently reported on C. sativa from Alberta, Canada (Paul et al., 2000). 


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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