Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
36.3K views | +0 today
Follow
Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Curated by dbtmobile
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Web of Things
Scoop.it!

DVICE: 'Melting' electronics could perform special tasks in your body

DVICE: 'Melting' electronics could perform special tasks in your body | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The biodegradable electronics are made using silicon and magnesium encased inside a silk layer. The qualities of the silk determine how long the system lasts before degrading, and since silicon and magnesium are both found in our bodies (in tiny quantities), DARPA assures that the technology shouldn't be harmful, whether it dissolves inside or outside the human body.


In medicine, dissolving electronics could be inserted into a wound before closing it up, and could monitor healing or apply heat to the damaged area to speed the process. Then, after a few weeks, the system would simply break apart, which would mean no second surgery to remove it and no more healing needed.


... dissolving electronics could mean a lot less e-waste, since your old phones, computers, toasters and what-have-you would biodegrade instead of sitting in a landfill. That, and instead of wearable electronics, why don't we just skip on over to embeddable bio-circuitry? Google Glass is fine to start, but I'm waiting for the disposable contact lens version.


Via ddrrnt
more...
Edward Wang's curator insight, June 19, 2013 9:28 AM

Reminds me of Stefanie's idea of compostable 3d printing.

Rescooped by dbtmobile from Digital et Santé
Scoop.it!

Consumers Hungry For Online Health Data Access - Healthcare IT Connect

Consumers Hungry For Online Health Data Access - Healthcare IT Connect | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Consumers Hungry For Online Health Data Access http://t.co/CdDyAe2l | #healthIT | #telemedicine | via @ehrandhit | #bigdata | #optum...

Via Tiffany Jésus
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Digital et Santé
Scoop.it!

Three new gamified health products

Three new gamified health products | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Details of three new gamified health products:

 

Cellnovo – a gamified diabetes tracking package with a mobile handset, web app, and insulin pump

 

HealthPrize – a medicine adherence application that rewards you for taking your medicine

 

Hubbub Health – a social health network that combines gaming, daily challenges, and a community to promote physical and mental wellness


Via Andrew Spong, Thomas N. Burg, Dimitra Kontochristou, Giuseppe Fattori, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Philippe Marchal, Tiffany Jésus
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Digital Health
Scoop.it!

Interoperability Or Not, Data Analytics Start-Up Apixio Helps Paint A Complete Portrait Of Patients - Forbes

Interoperability Or Not, Data Analytics Start-Up Apixio Helps Paint A Complete Portrait Of Patients - Forbes | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

As health care providers and vendors of electronic health records scramble to implement government rules requiring them to electronically share patient information, some start-ups and their clients are circumventing closed systems and expensive interfaces to mine their patient’s data.


Via Alex Butler
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from eSalud Social Media
Scoop.it!

Why #Healthcare needs #SocialMedia?

Why #Healthcare needs #SocialMedia? | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Health care needs transforming. It costs way too much, for one thing. And while we've made tremendous discoveries and stretched the capabilities of medicine in incredible ways, we aren't necessarily getting healthier. And in all our discovering and stretching, in all our cool technologies and emphasis on efficiency, we risk losing the personal connections that can be so crucial. Social media can help with all of this, for two simple and important reasons.

 

First, social media is all about relationships. One of the first presenters at the conference said this, and I couldn't agree more. Facebook, Twitter, online support groups -- they are all about sharing and interaction. And those are the building blocks for relationships.

 

Relationships are crucial to health. We know that people with more and stronger social connections are more likely to be well and happy, and social media can bolster that. It can give people ways to not just interact with friends and family, but ways to meet new people. There were lots of people at the conference talking about online support groups and the many ways they help patients, especially those with chronic disease.

 

Medicine itself is all about relationships. If you have good relationships with your health care providers, it helps you get better care. In good relationships, both sides listen more and tell more. When you trust someone, you are more likely to follow their advice. By finding ways for providers and patients to have conversations on social media, we could strengthen and support those relationships. This is a new frontier for us, and we'll need to be thoughtful about how we do it, but if we can face transplants and cure leukemia, I think we can figure out a way for doctors and patients to be together on social media.

 

Second, social media is all about communication. I spent a lot of time thinking about this during the conference, because we need more ongoing, real-time communication in health care. Not just the communication that happens in support groups, although that's important, but communication that allows us to give information back and forth.

 

The most common problems I see in my patients are obesity, asthma and school or behavioral problems. All of these are problems that are complicated, that involve home and lifestyle and can change from day to day. I can't even begin to do them justice in a 15-minute visit every few months. But if I could be in touch with people regularly, know what's going on and work together with them, I might actually make a difference. One doctor from the Center for Connected Health here in Boston talked about how they managed to cut readmissions for congestive heart failure in half -- just by having patients check their weight and blood pressure and sending the information in to the health care team, who made any necessary changes with them. That's huge.


Via nrip, Ignacio Fernández Alberti
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

Patient Engagement Is A Physician-Patient Communication Challenge…Not A Health Information Technology Challenge | HealthWorks Collective

Patient Engagement Is A Physician-Patient Communication Challenge…Not A Health Information Technology Challenge | HealthWorks Collective | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Physicians, hospitals and other providers are being misled by industry pundits claiming that more health information technology (as in EMRs, PHRs, Smart Phone apps, and web portals) is the key to greater patient engagement. It’s not.

If health information technology were all that was needed to “engage” patients then patient and member adoption rates of provider and payer web portals offering Personal Health Records (PHRs) and Electronic Health Records (EHRs) would not still be hovering around a disappointing 7% (with several notable exceptions Kaiser, Group Health and the VA).*

Part of the misunderstanding concerning the role of HIT comes from how the discussion about about patient engagement is being framed. According to the pundits, patient engagement is the physician or hospital’s responsibility… and like everything else these days…we can fix it if we just throw more technology at the problem. Can anyone say Stage 2 Meaningful Use requirements?

Here’s Why HIT Will Not Solve The Patient Engagement Challenge

The role of physicians, hospitals and other providers is not so much one of needing to engage patients in their care. Rather, providers need to “be more engaging” to patients who are already actively engaged in their health.

Here’s What I Mean…

Take the simple act of a trip to the doctor’s office. Before a person shows up at the doctor’s office they have to 1) have a reason or need (symptoms, a concern, chronic condition), 2) they have to believe that the need or reason merits seeing the doctor vs. taking care of it at home themselves – this generally implies cognition and doing research, i.e., talking with friends, going on line, etc., 3) making the appointment (by calling or going online and 4) showing up for the appointment, and 5) thinking about what they want to say to the doctor. The point here is that by definition, people that show up for a doctor’s appointment are already engaged!

Now providers tend to not consider the patient’s perspective when it comes to engagement. For most providers, i.e. physicians and hospitals, engagement means getting patients to do what providers say is in their best interest…what I say is right. But that approach totally dismisses the fact that, as I have shown, that patients are already engaged…just not in the same way that providers expect.

Whether patients remain engaged by the time they leave the doctor’s office, and to what extent, are the questions we should be asking. For example, how “engaged” would readers here find it if they went to their doctor only to have the doctor 1) not ask why they are there (fears and concerns) or worse yet ignore the fears and concerns which they describe to the doctor, 2) disagree with the doctor as to the visit priority and how to diagnose and treat it, including for example being prescribed medication when you don’t want to take pills or 3) found out that you knew more about your problem and how to deal with it than your doctor?

The Point?

The point is that providers need to be engaging to patients in their demeanor, attitudes, and how they talk with and listen to patients. Doctors need to know who the patient is, what their fears, concerns and expectations are and what the patient is able and will to do. Meaningful patient engagement, the kind that leads to long term health behavior change, begins with patient-centered, interpersonal relationships between patients and their doctors. As far as I know, we don’t have an app for that.

That’s what I think. What’s your opinion?

Source:

* John Moore, Chilmark Research

For more information on patient engagement, email me for a copy of my latest white paper on Patient Engagement in Primary Care or fill out the online form on my blog.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship
Scoop.it!

Help For Diabetics Beyond The Doctor's Office - Forbes

Help For Diabetics Beyond The Doctor's Office - Forbes | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
An online network helps folks with chronic illnesses manage healthcare conundrums and fight isolation.

 

(...)

 

"Diabetic Connect is the biggest draw to a group of 51 healthcare social networking sites owned by Alliance Health Networks. The other most popular sites by number of members cover arthritis, heart disease, sleep disorders, pulmonary disease, back pain, depression, GERD and bipolar disorder.

 

While many doctors warn patients against using the Internet to further research a new diagnosis, Alliance Health Network chief executive Stead Burwell predicts that ultimately more doctors will support a model where patients and caregivers share insights with each other. Especially when they see patients like Sheveland make progress.

 

Also, consumers will be drawn to the communities as they get put in high deductible health plans, face more out-of-pocket costs and want to compare notes on plans and expenses. “It will become an important tool for consumers as they face the increasing burden of managing healthcare going forward,” Burwell says." (...)


Via Camilo Erazo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from E-HEALTH - E-SANTE - PHARMAGEEK
Scoop.it!

As the Web Goes Mobile, Healthcare Stands Still | The Hippest ...

As the Web Goes Mobile, Healthcare Stands Still | The Hippest ... | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–U.S. consumers seeking health information online are more likely to visit Wikipedia than health magazine websites or Facebook, connect through a PC rather than a mobile device, and be swayed by word of mouth over direct-to-consumer advertising, according to results from a new national consumer survey conducted by Makovsky Health and Kelton. The Makovsky-Kelton research investigates consumers’ overall engagement with online healthcare information, and reveals specific consumer preferences for online publishing sources, channels and even devices. Data pinpoint trust in content sources, with consumers rating government agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and advocacy organizations among the most credible.

“These survey data shed light on where companies should invest to engage consumers in cost-efficient, yet effectively engaging ways.”

“Whether they want guidance for an informed conversation with their doctor, or the support of a larger community coping with the same illness, consumers seek trusted sources for health information,” said Gil Bashe, executive vice president and practice director, Makovsky Health. “With new and evolving access points, understanding the consumer mindset is critical to supporting improved health outcomes. These new survey results enhance our understanding of how and with whom consumers connect online, and help ensure that credible, useful information is readily accessible to the patients who need it.”

MAK Logo.jpg

“The macro-trend – globally and in the U.S. – is moving from web to mobile. Yet, when it comes to healthcare, data show the desktop search is vastly preferred, meaning the newest channels might not be best for healthcare marketers,” said Tom Bernthal, CEO, Kelton. “These survey data shed light on where companies should invest to engage consumers in cost-efficient, yet effectively engaging ways.”

Fielded to 1,001 nationally representative Americans ages 18 and older in July 2012, the survey reveals distinct findings about consumer preferences for online health information.

When and How Do Consumers Search?
People are still most likely to use a personal computer (90%) – and not a smartphone (7%) or tablet (4%) – to search for health information online. Further, these PC-reliant consumers are more likely than smartphone/tablet-reliant consumers to visit a pharma website after receiving a diagnosis from their doctor (52% vs. 31%), whereas smartphone/tablet users are far more likely than PC users (43% vs. 24%) to visit a pharma website after they experience a few symptoms.

Who Do Consumers Trust?
If seeking information about their own medical condition(s), consumers trust advocacy group and government agency websites (e.g., CDC or FDA) nearly as much (33%) as they trust websites with medical information, such as WebMD (35%). Further, a personal recommendation from a friend, family member or colleague (33%) is a stronger motivator to visit a pharma website than TV advertisements (27%), magazine advertisements (14%), digital advertisements (13%), or discounts (16%). Consumers also report an overall preference for externally-sourced information, though user-generated content on Wikipedia is gaining high levels of trust:

56% of Americans use WebMD for healthcare information31% visit Wikipedia, which has emerged as a trusted source of credible information, an increase of 13% from Makovsky Health’s 2011 survey29% visit health magazine websites online (e.g., Prevention, Women’s Health)Social networking sites are utilized by far fewer Americans for healthcare information: Facebook (17%), YouTube (15%), blogs (13%), and Twitter feeds with links to other resources (6%)

How Can a Company Connect?
In the context of Facebook, consumers are just as likely to rank a pharma company-generated page about a specific medication (9%) as their most trusted Facebook source as they are a pharma company’s disease-state page (6%) – far lower than Facebook content generated by sources such as government agencies or patient groups. But when it comes to news and announcements from a company, consumers are most likely to believe traditional sources:

53% are most likely to believe company news from a press release29% are most apt to believe what is posted on a company websiteOfficial corporate Facebook pages are a distant third (12%), while only 2% have the strongest faith in company news posted on Twitter

 


Via Tracy Parish, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Patient
Scoop.it!

No slackers among the backers: crowdfunding healthcare innovation

No slackers among the backers: crowdfunding healthcare innovation | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

From the MedStartr blog:

 

You would not believe the incredible folks that back our projects. It is a veritable Who’s Who in Healthcare Innovation and Patient Advocacy.

 

There are thousands of you now, but here is the list from Regina Holliday’s (@ReginaHolliday) Walking Gallery (#TheWalkingGallery) MedStartr Project where she raised $10,948 from 90 amazing men and women. We are honored and humbled by you.

 

Thank you for supporting our good friend and inspiration, Regina.

 

"If takes a village to raise a child, then it takes a global innovation community to raise the level of healthcare innovation."

 

We are proud and happy to enable this and give people a place to find

 

and fund the change that they believe in.

 

Backers of the Walking Gallery on MedStartr

 

Abby Prestin, Afternoon Napper, Alan Greene, Alex Fair, Alexandra Drane, Alexandra Yperifanos, Andre Blackman, Andrew J. Rosenthal, Andrew Spong Ann Becker-Schutte, Annette McKinnon, Benjamin Miller, Brian Ahier, Brian Carter, Bruce Ramshaw, Carolyn Der Vartanian, Carolyn Thomas, Chiara Bell, Clay Patterson, CMROpen, Colin Hung, Deirdre Bonnycastle, Devon Scanlon, Donna Scott, Elin Silveous, Emily Hackel, e-Patient Dave deBronkart, Fred Trotter, Gangadhar Sulkunte, Gregg Masters, Heather Leslie, Helen Hadley, Howard Luks MD, Ileana Balcu, Janice McCallum, Jerry Matczak, Jess Jacobs, John Moehrke, Joltdude, Jon Mertz, Jon Mertz (so nice he did it twice!) Julia Hallisy, Kavita Pate,l Keith W. Boone, Kim Whittemore, Kourtney Govro, Kristen Andrews, Linda Brady, Lisa Fields, Loring Day, Manny Hernandez, Marianne Vennitti, Marilyn Mann, Martine Ehrenclou, Mary Cattolico Camp Matthew Browning, Matthew Holt, Matthew Katz, Michelle Litchman, Mike Sevilla, Mindy Brown, Nick Dawson, Nicole Dettmar, P. F. Anderson, Pat Mastors,Patricia Salber, Peter Levin, Phoebe Browning, Phydian Systems, Qpid.me, Ronan Kavanagh, Roni Zeiger, Ross Martin, Ruth Ann Crystal, MD, S Turner Dean, Scott Strange, Sherry Reynolds, Steve Sisko, Sue Woods, Susan Eller, Symplur, LLC, Ted Eytan, Theresa Willett, and Whitney Bowman-Zatzkin

 

You Folks ROCK! Thank You!

 

Sincerely,

 

Alex, Mike, Komal, Theresa, Jigar, and Pooja

 

[AS: More about Regina Holliday's The Walking Gallery MedStartr project here: http://www.medstartr.com/projects/35-the-walking-gallery]


Via Andrew Spong
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Pharma Hub
Scoop.it!

Mobile medication therapy management system wins $1M NIH grant | mobihealthnews

Mobile medication therapy management system wins $1M NIH grant | mobihealthnews | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Leap of Faith Technologies, which offers a smartphone- and tablet-based mobile medication management system, has received a federal grant of more than $1 million to accelerate the commercialization of its technology.The National Cancer Institute (NCI), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), grant, recently awarded the Crystal Lake, Illinois-based company a $1,021,296 grant for its eMedonline platform, in hopes of keeping more cancer patients on their meds and out of the hospital. An unspecified “industry partner” will match the grant, according to the company, in order to integrate the medication adherence technology into an electronic health record.

Leap of Faith offers apps for Android and Apple iOS mobile devices for healthcare providers to communicate with patients in real time about their medications and, with the help of RFID tags or bar codes on drug packaging, verify that patients have taken their meds as prescribed. In a half-dozen reported clinical trials, eMedonline has shown adherence of about 98 percent among patients with cancer, hypertension, congestive heart failure and pneumonia using the system, significantly higher than those in control groups.

The platform also collects and aggregates data for monitoring outcomes and for drug surveillance and research, according to the company.

“eMedonline represents the convergence of mobile technology, clinical and behavioral science, and validated clinical outcomes in a mHealth platform that facilitates coordinated care and also supports ‘meaningful use’ [of electronic health records],” Leap of Faith founder and Chief Science Officer Barbara Rapchak says in a company statement.

Recently finalized standards for Stage 2 of the federal meaningful use EHR incentive program, starting in 2014, call on hospitals and physicians to perform medication reconciliation on at least 50 percent of their patients transitioning from another care setting. This measure is one of a menu providers can choose from in the current Stage 1.

This is not the first time the National Cancer Institute has supported eMedonline. Leap of Faith also won an $883,593 contract from NCI in 2008 to advance development and has had results of its clinical trials published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Others that have support eMedonline development and testing include pharmaceutical company Novartis, NIH’s National Institute on Aging and New York-Presbyterian Health System.


Via uri goren, Philippe Marchal
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

StartUp Health Adds 12 “Healthcare Transformers” to Its National Academy for Health and Wellness Entrepreneurs

StartUp Health Adds 12 “Healthcare Transformers” to Its National Academy for Health and Wellness Entrepreneurs | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Rapidly Growing Program for Top Health and Wellness Innovators Shares New Model for Success in Digital Health; Sectors of Innovation Range From Telehealth, Aging in Place, and Physician Engagement to Patient Communications, Social Health Content and...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Patient
Scoop.it!

Digital healthcare conference hopes to help remote communities

Digital healthcare conference hopes to help remote communities | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Experts from across the world are gathering in Moray for a conference looking at the benefits of digital healthcare.

 

New technology, which allows patients to report their symptoms using computers in their home, is being seen as a major boost for people living in remote areas as it allows doctors to monitor them more closely.

 

A pilot scheme run by NHS Grampian allows respiratory patients, for example, to use a touchscreen computer to report to their doctor's surgery and check their own breathing and oxygen levels using specialist kit.

 

More than a hundred delegates from across the world have gathered in Forres to discuss the digital health technology, which is can also be useful in remote regions where it can be difficult to reach a doctor.

Experts say digital healthcare can also cut costs and give patients greater control over their well-being.

 

It is hoped the conference will also forge links between countries hoping to implement the technology.


Via Andrew Spong
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

The economics of eHealth and mHealth. [J Health Commun. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI

While mHealth has the potential to overcome traditional obstacles to the delivery of health services to the poor in lower and middle-income countries--issues related to access, quality, time, and resources--there is little evidence as to whether the expected benefits and savings can be actualized on a large scale. As a first step to developing the investment case for mHealth, this article outlines some of the key economic and financial questions that need to be answered in developing in-country eHealth investments.

The proposed questions focus on the costs of eHealth infrastructure; regulatory structures that provide incentives at different levels of the health delivery system to encourage investment in, and use of, eHealth; and measuring the outcomes of successful eHealth utilization, including anticipated return on investment.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Pharma Hub
Scoop.it!

7 mobile apps for chronic condition management

7 mobile apps for chronic condition management | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Center for Technology Innovation said more than 40,000 mobile health applications are available across multiple platforms.
And with the number of Americans living with chronic disease expected to reach 157 million by 2020, according to research from RAND, the market for mobile health apps to help patients manage such diseases is large and growing.


Via Philippe Marchal
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship
Scoop.it!

Study: Many Physicians Using Social Media To Find, Share Health Data

Study: Many Physicians Using Social Media To Find, Share Health Data | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

"Many physicians are using social media to find and share health information, according to a study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/), FierceHealthIT reports.


For the study, researchers surveyed 485 practicing oncologists and primary care physicians.


The study found that 61% of respondents said that they used social media at least once weekly to scan or explore health information. About 24% of respondents said that they used social media at least once daily to scan for health information. The study also found that:

60% of respondents said that social media improves the quality of care they deliver; 57.5% said that they consider social media to be beneficial, engaging and a good way to get high-quality, up-to-date information; 46% said that they contribute new information through a social media platform at least once weekly; and 14.2% said that they contribute new information through a social media platform at least once daily.

Respondents said that ease of use and usefulness were the determining factors in their decision to share information with peers via social media (Hall, FierceHealthIT, 9/26)."

 

Read more: http://www.ihealthbeat.org/articles/2012/9/27/study-many-physicians-using-social-media-to-find-share-health-data.aspx#ixzz27hKIOEkN


Via Camilo Erazo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

How Mobile Technologies Fuel TeleHealth Advances

How Mobile Technologies Fuel TeleHealth Advances | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
The sheer power of smaller, cheaper, and faster healthcare is evident in today’s mobile health solutions.

 

Ever since the first experiments with telemedicine, providers have been taking steps to move healthcare closer to where patients live and work. Now, mobile technology—epitomized by the millions of such apps already downloaded to smartphones, but also appearing in nearly unlimited form factors—is accelerating those steps.

 

At Boston's Partners HealthCare, a system with 2,700 licensed beds, 45 employees scrutinize these developments at the Center for Connected Health. One early effort to equip cardiac patients with remote monitoring technology resulted in a 50% drop in readmissions, says Joseph Kvedar, MD, founder and director of the center.

 

"We're all committed to a healthcare delivery model that moves care out of the hospital, out of the office, and directly and continuously into the lives of patients," Kvedar says. "We find that the best technologies to facilitate that vision are monitoring and communications technologies properly applied."

 


Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from eSalud Social Media
Scoop.it!

Diagnosing Skin Cancer via iPhone: The Apps to Know

Diagnosing Skin Cancer via iPhone: The Apps to Know | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

Are you keeping an eye on your moles? Really, though? In light of the shortage of dermatologists, a market has developed to augment DIY monitoring of skin anomalies of all sorts. Instagram filters not recommended.

skinofmine.com

Forty-two percent of Americans live in areas that are "underserved by dermatologists," according to a set of recent and oft-cited journal studies. Long lines for Botox? Hardly. With all the cosmetics hoopla, it can be easy to forget that dermatology is most often serious business. Skin cancer, for instance, is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. When caught early, it's also entirely treatable.

Here's where things get interesting: Yes, people get a lot of moles, and moles tend to make people very nervous (with reason!). Yet in truth, while it's important to closely monitor your moles, most really are benign.

It takes just minutes for a good doctor to do a check, but compare that to the one to four months the average American currently has to wait to get an appointment. Moles aren't the only dermatologic condition that's simple to diagnose, either. Acne has a high cure rate, given just a handful of data points. Rosacea, eczema... the list goes on.

What this translates to is a massive market of conditions so easy to diagnose that they possess relatively low liability, a fact that's putting dermatology at the forefront of some extremely impressive mobile and telemedicine technology.

"Mobile dermatology solutions can help solve the problem of access, and that's fueling a lot of funding," says Unity Stoakes, co-founder of the Manhattan-based StartUp Health, an acceleration academy for health and wellness entrepreneurs. "Anyone with a smartphone has access to affordable apps, built-in diagnostic devices, and thereby the ability to connect with specialists who can help them monitor and check their skin."

We test drove five apps and sites heading up the trend:


Via Guus van den Brekel, Giuseppe Fattori, Ignacio Fernández Alberti
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Healthy society
Scoop.it!

Health care most shared issue in battleground states

Health care most shared issue in battleground states | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
The CNN Political Ticker is the hottest destination for the latest political news with dispatches, behind-the-scenes reports, and expert commentary, 24-7. For the latest political news from CNN's Best Political Team, with campaign coverage, 24-7.

Via Bernard Strée
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Digital Health
Scoop.it!

Doctors Use Social Media to Connect With Patients | Social Media Today

Doctors Use Social Media to Connect With Patients | Social Media Today | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Recent articles suggest that social media is finding a home among some doctors for creating better awareness and engagement among patients.

Via Alex Butler
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Health and Biomedical Informatics
Scoop.it!

Tracking your body with technology - CNN

Tracking your body with technology - CNN | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Tracking your body with technologyCNNAs of Thursday, there were 873 people registered for the Quantified Self message boards, where people discuss the latest apps and research.
Via fjms
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Digital et Santé
Scoop.it!

mHealth: 88% of Doctors Want Patients to Track Their Health at Home | HL7 Standards

mHealth: 88% of Doctors Want Patients to Track Their Health at Home | HL7 Standards | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The Wall Street Journal reports that fantasy baseball managers have more data to evaluate than patients and referring doctors. Eighty-eight percent of doctors would like to see their patients track their vital health data at home. Now imagine a set of tools designed to help people control and access their health information better than ever before according to AT&T’s CTO John Donovan who announced the development of the “The mHealth Platform” by the AT&T Foundry.


Via nrip, Tiffany Jésus
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from digital pharma
Scoop.it!

Twitter App Tracks Illness Outbreaks -- InformationWeek

Twitter App Tracks Illness Outbreaks -- InformationWeek | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
MappyHealth mines Twitter to help public health officials track disease outbreaks faster than traditional surveillance methods.

Via Olivier Delannoy, Lomenede Emmanuelle
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from E-HEALTH - E-SANTE - PHARMAGEEK
Scoop.it!

The Future of Doctor-Patient Video Calls

The Future of Doctor-Patient Video Calls | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
A Swedish company came out with an amazing innovation at a mobile company with which sales people can contact customers directly through a Minority Report-like solution. Is this the future of docto...

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by dbtmobile from Digital Health Trends
Scoop.it!

Study shows more than 30 percent of consumers are interested in sending health data to their doctors

Study shows more than 30 percent of consumers are interested in sending health data to their doctors | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

The number of consumers who are willing to communicate with their physicians via wireless devices is on the rise as confirmed by a study from the CEA.


Via Alex Butler, Stefano Viaggi, Medtep
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by dbtmobile
Scoop.it!

A Digital Health Manifesto: or why health data integration is the key to a healthcare renaissance

A Digital Health Manifesto: or why health data integration is the key to a healthcare renaissance | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it
Exciting times ahead, or not? It’s easy to get excited about the future of healthcare (we certainly are).
more...
No comment yet.