Media Literacy
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Media Literacy In Europe

Twelve good Media Literacy practices that will inspire you! A magazine published by the Evens Foundation.

http://www.evensfoundation.be
Katherine Bain's insight:

Europe is way ahead of the United States in a lot of categories, and we can now add Media Literacy to that list. This magazine has a publication with twelve projects to inspire a classroom to improve media literacy. The projects are engaging, interesting, and educational: utilizing assassin's creed in a history class based on video-games, teaching economy and money skills through social media (what if we had to pay for Facebook....), and engaging students in seminars when they are produced all through photographs to name a few. The list goes on, and these projects are applicable to students, teachers, and sometimes both.

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Mercy's curator insight, May 28, 2014 5:53 AM

media literacy practices

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A Closer Look at the Bechdel Rating

A Closer Look at the Bechdel Rating | Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Last week four non-profit movie theatres in Sweden (yes, Sweden again) released a ratings system named after the Bechdel Test.
Katherine Bain's insight:

In order to pass the Bechdel Test, a piece of fiction has to have at least two women who talk to each other about something other than a man. This article talks about how four non-profit movie theaters in Sweden that has now adopted this test into their ratings system for movies. Currently, the US rating system is only based on violence, language, and sex. The Bechdel test is a great introduction into how women are perceived in the media. If they don't pass this test than why? How come so many of our texts, and now movies, don't pass this test? Even beyond the Bechdel test, this could provide a gateway into what other ratings systems should be implemented when considering the quality, and appropriateness, of the media in all different genres.

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You Gotta See it to Believe it: Visual Literacy

Katherine Bain's insight:

This aritcle, supporting media literacy, is from the Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy. It begins with an example of analyzing Norman Rockwell's painting "Lift Up Thine Eyes." After talking us through how this too counts as literacy, the article continues to discuss some other great types of "texts:" tattoos, collages, paintings, and catalogues to name a few. This article defends these texts and credible and useful and also talks through examples of how to use them. The authors of this piece argue that critically analzying media and visual texts will also help with overall literacy skills.

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No Wonder They Call Me A Bitch

Katherine Bain's insight:

If your students can get past the title, then you have a great article in your hands! You'll quickly realize that this satirical piece, Ann Hodgman is actually referring to the original definition- a female dog. Hodgman decides to taste tests different types of dog food and compares the reality of the food to what the advertisements claim. It's funny, disgusting, and a great reminder to be critical of commercials. Not only that, but it's a good introduction to satirical writing as well; this piece was published in the satiric magazine Spy  as opposed to the Eating Well magazine Hodgman usually writes for.

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Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Hutzler 571 Banana Slicer

Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Hutzler 571 Banana Slicer | Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for at Amazon.com. Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.
Katherine Bain's insight:

First and foremost, the reviews for the Hutzler 571 Banana Slicer are hilarious. More importantly, Amazon reviews are a great source for analyzing media. These particular reviews are funny and provide a great text to evaluate in terms of their effectiveness. Some of the reviews include elation in finding a way to cut a banana without using a knife to disappointment that the angle does not fit the angle of the customer's bananas. These reviews will have your students laughing, evaluating, and maybe even inspire them to write their own.

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Media Literacy Week - Manitoba: Is Your Class Up for a Media Literacy Week Instagram Challenge?

Media Literacy Week - Manitoba: Is Your Class Up for a Media Literacy Week Instagram Challenge? | Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Katherine Bain's insight:

Media Literacy Week starts November 4th, but why not make any week media literacy week! This blog by The Manitoba Teachers' Society (MTS) & Manitoba Education and the Manitoba Association for Computing Educators talks about ways to engage your students in Media Literacy with an Instagram challenge! I think this is a great of way of appropriately engaging your students, and this blog is just one example of how to get started. MTS provides a few examples, but feel free to tweak the daily challenges to fit your classroom. Decide on a class hashtag so everyone can follow each others posts. Here are a few of the suggestions for daily challenges: (1) Stuff I like (2) Stuff you want me to like (3) So many ads (4) Fast food is the only kind?
5) Is this what you really think of me?

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The Ugly Reality of Creating Reality Television

The Ugly Reality of Creating Reality Television | Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Reality TV attracts millions of viewers and thousands of hopefuls, but at what cost?
Katherine Bain's insight:

If Reality TV is so popular in our society, then maybe it's time we really look into why. Analyzing these TV shows and understanding their appeal is a great way to teach media literacy skills to our students. O'Mara, the author of this article, thinks we should look into reality TV as a chicken-egg question: what's causing the appeal? Is it because of how many there are (so popularity breeds popularity), or because they are mirroring the changing values of our society? While O'Mara wouldn't advocate watching reality TV in our spare time, maybe there is room for this phenomemon in the classroom.

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New series of media literacy videos for educators | MediaSmarts

New series of media literacy videos for educators | MediaSmarts | Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Katherine Bain's insight:

This Canadian center for media literacy has just produced six quick one minute videos!The first answ ers the question "What is Media Anyway?" The following five explain different components of media literacy; for example, the second video is about media as a construction built from words, illustration, and sounds. The videos are quick, upbeat, and professionally made. The images in the video are paired well with the voice over, but the images aren't necessary and could be used solely for the audio.

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The Single Mother Battle on Stereotypes | BWSS

The Single Mother Battle on Stereotypes | BWSS | Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Katherine Bain's insight:

The stereotypes surrounding single mothers is hard to address, and requires a mature group of students to handle this conversation. However, I think it's a stereotype often reinforced in the media, so I think it leans itself to being analyzed in media literacy. What ads or plots reinforce this stereotype? How often does media try to overcompesate? This article, written by a single mother, addresses her issues with the assumptions made about who she is. She provides a very lengthy list, one of the lengthiest I've seen, containing all of these steretoypes related to single-parens and children from single-parent families. It provides a great starting point in this conversation about single-parents in the media!

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Fakebook

Fakebook | Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Katherine Bain's insight:

What better way to study media on the internet than creating a a Fakebook? Fakebook is a fake Facebook website intended to create profiles for fictional and historical characters. All of the elements are there, from birthdays, to friends and posting on walls. For historical characters, or fictional characters from the past, you can even date posts back in time. This tool will help you analyze characters from the class texts. It also provides you the opportunity to talk about the information people post about themselves online. There are a lot of resources online that provide documents you can download and fill in on Word; however, this tool is an interactive online website that can be updated live.

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Reviews and Ratings for Family Movies, TV Shows, Websites, Video Games, Books and Music

Reviews and Ratings for Family Movies, TV Shows, Websites, Video Games, Books and Music | Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Common Sense Media is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent ...
Katherine Bain's insight:

This website is full of media resources, particularly focused on finding appropriate media for younger children! There is a whole link focused on eduation, particularly on interactive assessments for K-12 Digital Literacy. There is an entire program for teachers to apply, complete, and become a certified Digital Citizenship Certified Common Sense Educator. There are links to reviews for movies, games, and apps so both parents and teachers can make informed decisions on what to show the students. These reviews also provide great texts to analyze! All of the links, games, and other resources are organized as for parents or teachers, and they are also organized by appropriate age. You can spend a long time looking at all this site has to offer, but it is worth it!

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Miss Representation | Home

Katherine Bain's insight:

Miss Representation, a Sundance Film Festival film in 2011, challenges the role of women in today's media. This is a great film to open up conversation about the perception of women. Miss Representation even goes as far as to connect the media's representation with real situations women have to deal with in society today. With real women sharing their stories, this movie will engage your students and get everyone talking. This site also provides more resources including a chance to get involved in fixing this misrepresentation. There is a hashtag to call out sexist media, a pledge to sign, links to positive media, and more educational resources.

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Jeff Hancock: The future of lying | Video on TED.com

Who hasn’t sent a text message saying “I’m on my way” when it wasn’t true or fudged the truth a touch in their online dating profile? But Jeff Hancock doesn’t believe that the anonymity of the internet encourages dishonesty.
Katherine Bain's insight:

This TED talk discusses new ways lying has been introduced into our society because of our media. While this video is a bit long, at 20 minutes, excerpts could be great to kick start a conversation about the internet. Is anonymity what leads to lying? Or does the anonymity encourage more honesty? After watching this video, it can lead the class to look into those lies that they've experienced. What lies do we buy? Why? Jeff Hancock argues that certain types of media also correspond with different levels of honesty and credibility. This video could also be used at the end of the unit, asking students to respond to Hancock's ideas after spending time looking into this idea of lying and the media.

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19 Puzzling Differences Between "Time" Magazine U.S. And International Covers

19 Puzzling Differences Between "Time" Magazine U.S. And International Covers | Media Literacy | Scoop.it
There may be a reason why Americans don't know very much about international news. The U.S. editions of Time magazine are often a little...different from the ones that go out to the rest of the...
Katherine Bain's insight:

Don't be wary that this is a buzzfeed article! First off, buzzfeed is in itself a great source of media analysis as it is a huge trend right now. Secondly, this article brings up a huge issue of country perpsective in the media. By already comparing 19 different TIME magazines, it is clear there is a discrepancy as to what should be on the front cover. This discrepancy can lead to countless conversations about media literacy starting with the purpose of a front cover (from both the creator and the audience's opinion) to what different countries value based on their media images. There are only 19 covers from only 1 magazine in this article...how many other puzzling differences exist?

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Mimi Ito on Learning in Social Media Spaces (Big Thinkers Series)

Mimi Ito on Learning in Social Media Spaces (Big Thinkers Series) | Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Mimi Ito, an expert in young people's use of digital media, shares her research on informal learning in online communities, where students can build technology skills, learn media literacy, and create and share their work.
Katherine Bain's insight:

In this Big Thinkers Series, Mimi Ito argues that our students personal habits in social media might be a form of learning media literacy! This video series is produced by edutopia, and Ito is a research expert of young people's digital media habits. Ito argues that "messing around" can be a strong foundation for building interest in media literacy. There is a difference between the social interaction and the creative "messing around" aspects of social media. Ito also argues that while there is not a lot of room for parents or aduts in the relationship side, there is room for education and mentors in the other half. If we're ready to take that "messing around" and develop meaningful skills, Ito challenges us to figure out how to make that transition.

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