MLC Geo400 class portfolio
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World-Wide geography information for GEO 400
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An Interactive Map of the Blitz: Where and When the Bombs Fell on London

An Interactive Map of the Blitz: Where and When the Bombs Fell on London | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
The extent of the campaign is shocking.

Via Seth Dixon
Michelle Carvajal's insight:

This is absolutely mind boggling. How were people supposed to survive this in the first place? The interesting point about this is that London in majority of its areas does not seem like it was ever hit by so many bombs to begin with. It puts into perspective just how a place can be affected and how it can improve and move on from those events. Incredible.

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:46 PM

This is one of my favorite maps that I have seen. How devastating it must have been to live in London at the time, never knowing where the next one would land to destroy the city.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 7:50 AM

This map shows the locations for the nearly 2000 bombs which were dropped on London during the Blitz in WWII. The bombs were dropped entirely inside the ring of M25 London Orbital Motorway which encircles London. The bombs are most concentrated in the center of the ring, likely to do the most damage, to either infrastructure or the people.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:30 PM

This map shows just how devastating the bombs were on London. At first glance, this does not look like a map of the bombs dropped. It would not be until it was labeled as such would it show the results of the war on London. Very few areas were unaffected and the majority of London was hit.

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Venice sinking five times faster than thought?

Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it

Venice, by virtue of its geographic situation will always be sinking as a course of nature.  A research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UCSD has recently concluded that Venice is sinking 2 millimeters per year...not catastrophic on a single year basis, but threatens the long-term viability and sustainability of the location. 

 

Urban ecology: what economic forces created the rationale for building Venice?  What environmental factors are currently threatening it?  Will economic or environmental forces win out? Location: do the economic advantages of a location outweigh the environmental liabilities of the location?  How do these competing factors influence the development of a city?  For additional information on this story see: http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-03-venice-hasnt.html

 

-The fact that Venice is slowly sinking is not surprising as here in the US we have our own states with cities that are easily affected by hurricanes etc due to their sea level. The interesting point about Venice is however, that they began to build a wall with gate that would close off the rising sea level to Venice and prevent it from possibly flooding during an event where the water would try to get in. In the article it is stated that the wall/gate itself is sinking as well every year as the ground sinks. Now, these expensive flood walls will need to be patched as the sink in order to keep the height at a level where it will still protect the city. To what extent will this continue is uncertain and can the flooding plus the sinking eventually ruin Venice forever?  I believe that the city was originally made this way to allow the import and export of goods as it was easier to transport from one side of venice to the other through water. With this being said, it was easier for people to stand by and buy off the boat/gandola and for the merchant it was easier to hand up as well. This being my opinion, reasons could have been different and the thought of what could potentially happen to the city were probably no where near. We still have to take into consideration that no matter how profitable it may have been to have a city with water streets, it created a liability for the people that reside in this area. - M.C


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:36 PM

Day to day, even looking into next year the rate of 2 millimeters per year may not seem drastic.  To a city that has been around for hundreds of years, it's assumed the city plans to stay standing for hundreds more.  Considering the age of the city, say in a couple hundred more years, some buildings could begin to take in water.  It is also possible that certain parts of the city could be sinking faster than others.  There is a similar situation in Mexico City where it was built on a lake and each year that source diminishes due to the demand of water by its residents.  Certain parts of the city are sinking and some buildings are slanted due to the results.  These cities are beautiful  but reality shows that as time passes, it will probably only get worse.  Hopefully preventions can be taken to at least reduce the speed of sinking so that people after us can appreciate the architecture and atmosphere the city has provided all these years.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:11 PM

Venice is a city that capitalized on its geography and developed canals so the city could grow despite being so close to sea level. Now that sea levels are rising, Venice is in trouble because its survival is dependent on the water levels, as they become out of control Venice will not be able to withstand the change. There are similar circumstances like in the Maldives where global warming and rising sea levels will put entire countries under water.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 15, 2015 6:58 PM

As you mentioned in class, we are living on constantly moving land features. In the case of Venice, the water is moving in on the city so it is actually sinking and has been for quite some time. What is new to the equation is that it might be sinking “five times more than” originally “calculated or “7.8 inches every hundred years.” I say might be because there are others who quibble about this new find, saying it is inaccurate. Also, there is a damn project in the works to try and combat the sinking. While I am happy that the city is working on slowing the process, I am curious to know what their solution is going to be when the city finally does go under. As I was reading this all I could think of was saving all the rich art and history that this Italian city is famous for. In some ways it is great that the city knows ahead of time that it is sinking because they have time to plan a way to save the important aspects of the city. On another hand though, the city is so below sea level that a natural disaster could cause far more damage than anyone could have foreseen. I just hope that doesn’t happen anytime soon because Venice is definitely on my bucket list.  

 

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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

-Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

-I believe that this article is important for the simple fact that today we still see this discrimination among religion. Now, it is not necessarily said that it is a discrimantory act what is being done to the Mulsims but we can clearly see that it is close to it. The fact that 9/11 happened put the people who are a part of this religion in a tough predicamnet but people still do not see that the actions of one or a few are not of all. A country should not base their laws or try to govern their people based on their religious beliefs because if that were the case where would all the population go that were protestant or catholic? Just an example. Muslims migrate from one place to another and only look to be accepted within the community. Economically it makes sense for Muslims to be accepted for the simple fact that they create new structures for their religion, they work hard, and without offending anyone they live their lives and are a key element of population and economic growth. The fact that other countries are helping Muslims would clearly make them see that they can take their life somewhere else and bring a long with them the potential of new jobs, and more people that can give any country a higher minority rate beneficial to their economy. A good nation will realize that by having ANY race with their beliefs brings in a higher interest of people and also allows for assistance in grants etc. a country will always be diverse and if they look to change how they feel, dress or act only creates a deeper problem. What would happen if they roles were reversed? -MC

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Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 2014 1:18 PM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 8:59 PM

The Muslim community was never really accepted in Europe looking back in history. Now more and emigrating and in mass numbers in certain areas.  While the European Union is a stronghold keeping Europe together, the argument can be made that the countries are falling apart in terms of identity, economy and production. A new wave of immigrants will not help increase their national identity and strength.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:58 PM

I feel that the rejection of any attempt to integrate Islam into European society is, at least in part, a reaction to the declining native population of most of the major Western European nations. They are attempting to keep anyone they cant assimilate out, while insuring that any Muslims that they can assimilate are dressing and acting close enough to the existing culture so as to blend into their native population.

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Devolution: A Beginner's Guide

Devolution: A Beginner's Guide | MLC Geo400 class portfolio | Scoop.it
What is devolution and how has it changed how Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales are governed?

 

This article with videos, charts and images was designed as a primer for UK voters for the 2010 election to understand who devolution in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland were reshaping the political landscape in the United Kingdom.  It is general enough that even though it is outdated as a news story, it serves as a concrete example from geography students to understand the processes and reasons for a decentralization of political power.

 

-This article is clear and straight to the point in giving the reader good examples of devolution and how it affects each country politically. The transfer of powers changes each country in the sense that they can each decide over their own local gov't (whichever it may be). With this each respective country can even provide funding (grants) toward their police dept, fire dept etc. What is interesting in this article however is how UK chose to stay the way it is. In a sense it is actually smart because they still have a say in matters of foreign policy and can still pass legislation according to devolved matters within the devolved government. The devolution of powers affect the regular citizen of each country how? In a positive or negative way?- M.C


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:44 AM

The parliament in London is shifting more power to Scotland and other areas in what is called devolution.  This reflects a push for more independence of countries in the UK that are not England. In order to keep the UK together concessions must be made, this devolution is the British Parliament's efforts to keep the UK intact.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 11, 2015 9:30 AM

Unit 4 political geography 

This picture explains how devolution works and provides a specific example with the breaking down of power of the imperialist England and it's control into an equally represented United Kingdom. This is an example of devolution at it's best.

This picture relates to unit 4 because it shows how devolution, which is a major part of unit 4, works. It explains it's parts and gives specific geographic examples as in the U.K. this overall relates to unit 4.

Matthew Connealy's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:04 PM

Devolution is the transfer of powers from a central government to more regional power, in this case, the UK. The UK devolved its powers to England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. These countries have had independent parliaments since 1997. Some "reserved powers" have not been devolved from the UK such as foreign affairs, military defense, international and  economic policies. This change of power has stirred questions on public spending and tax policies, and is still a debate and event to keep your eye on.

 

I feel that devolution has many benefits that outweigh the negative consequences such as money spending. Countries can function in a more independent manner and govern themselves within their defined boundaries in a more efficient way. This topic and article gives greater insight to our political unit and provides great insight for each country's respective parliament.