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Importance of the humble fig to humankind : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Importance of the humble fig to humankind : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology Finds | Scoop.it

Figs and fig trees are familiar to a wide cross-section of human society, both as a common food and for their spiritual importance. What is less well understood is the global nature of this association between figs and humans, which is maintained across species, continents and societies.

This relationship is explored by David Wilson of Ecology and Heritage Partners and Anna Wilson from the University of Melbourne in Australia in a paper published in the Springer journal Human Ecology. Using examples from around the world, the authors show that figs are a vital resource for humans, no matter which species are present in a region.


Via David Connolly
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Survival cannibalism took place at historic Jamestown : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Survival cannibalism took place at historic Jamestown : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology Finds | Scoop.it

Douglas Owsley, the division head for physical anthropology at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, presented a forensic analysis of 17th-century human remains proving that survival cannibalism took place in historic Jamestown.

The findings answer a long-standing question among historians about the occurrence of cannibalism at Jamestown during the deadly winter of 1609–1610 known as the “starving time”—a period during which about 80 percent of the colonists died. The announcement was made with chief archaeologist William Kelso from the Jamestown Rediscovery Project at Preservation Virginia, and historian James Horn, vice president of research and historical interpretation at Colonial Williamsburg; each expert provided context about the discovery and the history of the site.


Via David Connolly
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Rune stone rediscovered after 300 years : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Rune stone rediscovered after 300 years : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology Finds | Scoop.it

A nearly 1,000 year-old rune stone has been rediscovered at Bogesunds brygga west of Vaxholm in Sweden.

The rune stone was found during an excursion which was part of a course in landscape archaeology at Stockholm University. The stone has previously been known, but had been missing since the 17th century.


Via David Connolly
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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, May 3, 2013 4:14 PM

Hey, archaeologists of the 17th century, this is why we can't have nice things.

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Roman cemetery – under another car park in Leicester : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Roman cemetery – under another car park in Leicester : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology Finds | Scoop.it

The University of Leicester archaeological unit that discovered King Richard III has spearheaded another dig and discovered a 1,700 year old Roman cemetery – under another car park in Leicester.

The find has revealed remains thought to date back to 300AD – and includes personal items such as hairpins, rings, belt buckles and remains of shoes.


Via David Connolly
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The Archaeology News Network: Ancient petroglyphs documented in NE Argentina

The Archaeology News Network: Ancient petroglyphs documented in NE Argentina | Archaeology Finds | Scoop.it

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Biosciencia's curator insight, April 29, 2013 7:08 AM

The exploration of this area is part of a much wider project aimed at the excavation
and restoration of the Incan site known as Potrero de Payogasta