Miscellaneous Hominid Group Information
183 views | +0 today
Follow
Miscellaneous Hominid Group Information
Hominid Groups explored....
Curated by Paul PBKey
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Paul PBKey
Scoop.it!

Newsela | Celebrating 40 years of knowing Lucy

Newsela | Celebrating 40 years of knowing Lucy | Miscellaneous Hominid Group Information | Scoop.it
When Donald Johanson met Lucy in 1974, her 3-foot, 6-inch frame spoke to him. He discovered that she walked upright, and that shifted the idea of human evolution. She rocked his science.
Paul PBKey's insight:

Great article (from NEWSELA) on Lucy that includes an interview.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul PBKey from Prehistoric Archaeology & Human Evolution
Scoop.it!

Handier than Homo habilis? Versatile hand of Australopithecus sediba makes a better candidate for an early tool-making hominin

Handier than Homo habilis? Versatile hand of Australopithecus sediba makes a better candidate for an early tool-making hominin | Miscellaneous Hominid Group Information | Scoop.it

"Hand bones from a single individual with a clear taxonomic affiliation are scarce in the hominin fossil record, which has hampered understanding of the evolution of manipulative abilities in hominins. An international team of researchers including Tracy Kivell of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany has now published a study that describes the earliest, most complete fossil hominin hand post-dating the appearance of stone tools in the archaeological record, the hand of a 1.98-million-year-old Australopithecus sediba from Malapa, South Africa."


Via Maria João Valente
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul PBKey from How to social media
Scoop.it!

Dmanisi Human: Skull from Georgia Implies All Early Homo Species were One | Anthropology | Sci-News.com

Dmanisi Human: Skull from Georgia Implies All Early Homo Species were One | Anthropology | Sci-News.com | Miscellaneous Hominid Group Information | Scoop.it
An analysis of hominid skull from Dmanisi suggests the earliest Homo - Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis and so forth - belonged to the same species.

Via David Simpson
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul PBKey
Scoop.it!

Tools & Food | The Smithsonian Institution's Human Origins Program

Tools & Food | The Smithsonian Institution's Human Origins Program | Miscellaneous Hominid Group Information | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul PBKey
Scoop.it!

BBC - Science & Nature - Prehistoric Life - Cavemen facts

BBC - Science & Nature - Prehistoric Life - Cavemen facts | Miscellaneous Hominid Group Information | Scoop.it
Facts about various 'cavemen' featured in the 2003 BBC series Walking with Cavemen, presented by Robert Winston...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul PBKey from Mind Candy { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square
Scoop.it!

News : College of Liberal Arts : Texas State University

News : College of Liberal Arts : Texas State University | Miscellaneous Hominid Group Information | Scoop.it

The discovery of the 1 million-year-old site is significant, Bousman said, because so little is known of early humans between 1.5 million and 200,000 years ago. Brink added that, if this tooth is confirmed as Homo habilis, then it is the youngest Homo habilis remains in Africa, showing that the evolution of hominines is more complex than is currently understood.

 

“In southern Africa, we have well-preserved human remains from 4.5 million to about 1.5 million years ago, from Australopithecines, who ate plants and scavenged animal carcasses. But, once hominines such as Homo habilis and Homo erectus started making stone tools and shifted to hunting, the archaeological record thins out in Southern Africa. We have huge gaps of missing information between 1.5 million and 200,000 years ago. This finding helps us to fill in the record,” Bousman said. 

 

Bousman was the first archaeologist to date the Cornelia site using paleomagnetic reversals, and the molar is the oldest hominine specimen to be found in southern Africa, outside of the so-called Australopithecine caves in northern South Africa. 

 

The molar and stone tools—found in a bone bed probably created by spotted hyenas—were discovered by Brink and his international team of archaeologists and other scientists—including Bousman—from South Africa, Australia, Great Britain, France, Italy, and the United States. Details of the discovery were published recently in the Journal of Human Evolution, www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-human-evolution.

 

The stone tools include large hand axes and cleavers, for butchering animals and crushing bones. These tools stand out for their great size, according to Dr. John Gowlett of the University of Liverpool. The hand axes measure about 9.5 inches long and the cleavers measure over 7 inches long, 4 inches wide and more than 2 inches thick. 

 

Hand axes of this length are known from many sites in Africa, but it is unusual for them to predominate in an assemblage, according to Gowlett. Stone flakes and other tool-making debris were also discovered in the bone bed, suggesting that these and similar tools had been made close to the spot.

 

It is believed that individuals classified as early Homo hunted by running their prey—including wildebeest, eland, an extinct giant wildebeest called Megalotragus eucornutus, and other antelope—to exhaustion. Because the stone butchering tools were very heavy, early humans probably worked cooperatively to steer their prey—sometimes whole herds of animals—toward a killing site where they used these tools for butchering..................


Via Fico Ventilatory
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul PBKey
Scoop.it!

Human evolution: Fifty years after Homo habilis

Human evolution: Fifty years after Homo habilis | Miscellaneous Hominid Group Information | Scoop.it
Bernard Wood explains why the announcement of 'handy man' in April 1964 threw the field of hominin evolution into a turmoil that continues to this day.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul PBKey
Scoop.it!

Walking Upright | The Smithsonian Institution's Human Origins Program

Walking Upright | The Smithsonian Institution's Human Origins Program | Miscellaneous Hominid Group Information | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.