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Healthy Living & Healthy Hearing

Healthy Living & Healthy Hearing | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it

According to the World Health Organization, 360 million people worldwide have disabling hearing loss. What’s more, half of all cases of hearing loss are avoidable through primary prevention. Living a healthy life such as eating right, exercising, and healthy habits can help with age related

 

 


Via williamdunn66
Lyle Dighton's insight:

Approaches to correcting hearing damage through lesser recognised means have been addressed within this article. The author details how following a healthy diet and participating in exercise can assist in reducing hearing damage and maintaining optimum physicla wellbeing.

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OSHA to Hold Stakeholder Meeting on Hearing Loss Prevention - Safety.BLR.com

OSHA to Hold Stakeholder Meeting on Hearing Loss Prevention - Safety.BLR.com | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it
OSHA to Hold Stakeholder Meeting on Hearing Loss PreventionSafety.BLR.com...

Via philippe porta
Lyle Dighton's insight:

The article details how OHS stakeholders have assisted in formulating a safe operating guide for workers in a high level noise environment with 12 preventative steps. The steps are published in a handbook and would be a useful tool for Tim and his bandmates to utilise. 

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CDC - Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention - Noise Meter Flash - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic

CDC - Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention - Noise Meter Flash - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it
Do you work in an area where noise is becoming a health concern? Find out if you need hearing protection here: http://t.co/EswrsDJvJZ

Via Ronna Fisher
Lyle Dighton's insight:

Tim and his band would benefit from using this technology, as it measures sound volume varitations and how much exposure is regarded as a risk. There is an interactive feature which helps the user understand what sorts of everyday sounds produce the most amount of noise. 

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Ronna Fisher's curator insight, June 26, 2013 2:27 PM

Great interactive noise meter! What's hurting your hearing?

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Health and Safety at Greenslopes Hospital

Health and Safety at Greenslopes Hospital | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it

Hospitals in Australia are among some of the most hazardous working environments, with various unique risks prevalent on a day to day basis (Australian Government 2013).

 

Mrs. Lydia Dighton, 26, is a registered nurse at Greenslopes Private Hospital, a branch of Ramsey Health, explains the types of hazards she has to be aware of during  a shift; "We as nurses have to be always mindful of potential risks. Risks can range from germ and biological hazards to trip and fall injuries."

 

Employees at Greenslopes Private Hospital operate under a risk management system which stipulates such harm minimisation strategies as infection control, patient falls and medication safety (Greenslopes Private Hospital 2014). Mrs. Dighton talks more about how hazards are controlled during a shift; "We work eight hour shifts, and at the end of every shift we do whats called a 'turn over', in which we use a tape recorder to verbally document all aspects of the shift. This includes all medication administered, any falls which have taken place and potential bacteria present."

 

To assist staff at Greenslopes Hospital, Workplace Health and Safety Queensland have developed initiatives to keep all working personnel safe by implementing a 'zero harm at work' policy. The policy works to implement a positive culture of safety in Queensland workplaces (Queensland Government 2014).

 

Mrs. Dighton comments on the zero harm policy; "I really think the initiative is helping working people in Queensland, and is definatley a step in the right direction to managing risk in the workplace."

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Risk In Local Australian Football

Risk In Local Australian Football | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it

Australian Rules Football is the oldest Australian sporting code, with its founding year beginning in 1897 (Sandercock & Turner, 1982, pp. 4-5). Since its inception, many rule changes have been implemented to attempt in correcting some of the potentially hazardous game conditions which can occur during play.

 

Scott Kitchiner, 26, has played Australian Rules Football at a local level for over fifteen year, and explains how some hazardous occurances have impacted upon his life; "I have suffered a number of injuries during my playing experiences, but only last year did I get an injury which was quite serious."

 

Mr. Kitchiner suffered a shoulder injury during a game in 2013, which required reconstructive surgery. During the period of his rehabilitation, Mr. Kitchiner was unable to partake in his regular work duties as a tradesman, causing significant financial hardship on himself and his family.

 

"All footy players are aware of the risks everytime we take to the field, and I guess deep down, that is what attracts a lot of players to the game. It's just difficult when a risk causes an injury like the one I copped". Mr.Kitchiner anticipates to play again in the 2015 season, but says "next time I play, I will have to take more care to make sure I don't re-injure myself."

 

For further hazard prevention, Australian Rules officials should endeavour to educate and inform local players about the risks of participating in the specific physical activities, which are unique to the sport. Safety education is an effective means of hazard prevention, and if implemented correctly, can assist in correcting  potentially dangerous injuries from taking place (Dupprex, Olivier & Bunn, 2002).

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Too many are dying in mining accidents - Northern Star

Too many are dying in mining accidents - Northern Star | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it
Too many are dying in mining accidents
Northern Star
TOO MANY mine workers are being killed on Australian operations and too many of those are contractors.

Via Nicholas Rowland
Lyle Dighton's insight:

An insufficient knowledge of OHS practices and standards is why the mining industry is claiming the mentioned fatalities. Ongoing safety awareness training and education should be made more available for mining personnel to utilise. Another method of preventing deaths could also involve safety professionals working with personnel more often than against them (working together to achieve effective safety outcomes).

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Glen Evans's curator insight, March 11, 2014 1:20 PM

This article shows that contractors especially smaller companies with less experience in the development and implementation in their own safety procedures are a big factor when it comes to deaths on mine sites. The human factor must always play a part and education in regard to safety especially with big industry, with large unforgiving equipment at work, is one of the most important tools given to workers.  

Mark Brodie's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:17 PM

An insufficient knowledge of OHS practices and standards is why the mining industry is claiming the mentioned fatalities. Ongoing safety awareness training and education should be made more available for mining personnel to utilise. Another method of preventing deaths could also involve safety professionals working with personnel more often than against them (working together to achieve effective safety outcomes).

lee matthews's curator insight, March 15, 2017 4:56 AM
In the future I would love to work on a mine site, and yes as the article states "they are dangerous". However with proper training and education around procedures and equipment this can be drastically minimised. But..... what if this was not the case due to need or indeed duty of care. This article particularly touches base with me as I have been in the civil industry for some time and seen what poorly arranged and ill equipped contracts and  labour hire can do. Traditionally you would start with a company and be taught from the ground up. You would care for your employees and take them from job to job where applicable. This meant that you knew their skill levels, what they were capable of and also most importantly their level of training as it was done "in house". I personally believe this created "all round" workers with solid foundations of knowledge. It also gave the worker a sense of security and longer term purpose, to which the worker would return in loyalty and knowledge obtained over time of employment.
With the introduction of labour hire and contractors into a highly competitive and often profitable environment this changed, I believe for the worst. Jobs once again became about profit and as a result machine maintenance, employee education, job stability and pay rates diminished while keeping the mirage that production and profits were all on track. Yet workplace accidents rose? So who is to blame? Surely not the principle contractor who head hunted the cheapest contract... what about the embattled contractor who didn't read the fine lines in his contract and is battling to meet deadline, find operators and stay afloat? Should jobs then be won from a safety stand point? Would that not promote companies to cover up incidents in order to win contracts?  I might not know the answer to these question but ,I sure know who ends up suffering until we get it right. Me and you the humble worker who just wants food on the table and to see their family EVERY night.
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Explosion kills 29 in China mine

Explosion kills 29 in China mine | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it
Another deadly accident in China's coal mining industry has killed 29 miners in the southern Hunan province.

Via Leicester Worker, Rachel Stronach
Lyle Dighton's insight:

Health and safety standards differ around the world, and is made apparent in this article. A beginning point to correct an accident such as this from occuring could be to employ safety professionals from outside the country to bring a fresh perspective toward safety reforms.

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Rachel Stronach's curator insight, March 1, 2014 2:50 AM

I'd be interested to know how Occupational Health and Safety is conducted in different countries. It makes me thank Australia's Health and Safety Industry reading that over 2000 people died in Chinese Mines in 2010.

Vonny~'s comment, March 1, 2014 3:06 PM
Yes ... this is great to see your insights! Well done! :)
Melissa Grieve's curator insight, March 12, 2014 9:19 AM

China's mining industry is the most dangerous in the world with the highest death rate; therefore the industrys safety standards need to be increased greatly. Even though there has been an improvment from 2009 - 2010 with less death rates, there still needs to be alot more enforcement on this issue. Sadly, the result of these 29 deaths could have been easily prevented. The mine bosses that were in control of this particular mine, were seeking to limit their economic losses to gain profit for the year. This topic greatly interests me as the issue of economics and how it can affect companies, can have an impact on health and safety standards. During my field of future work, I would love to be able to investigate and create new ways and cheaper ways for companies to easily meet all safety measures.  

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Man whose son died on construction site pleas for better safety rules

Man whose son died on construction site pleas for better safety rules | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it
Rocky Tallent, a retired construction worker from Knoxville, buried his 27-year-old son, Michael, after a work-related accident claimed his life on New Year's Eve in 2012.

Via Garth Jacobs
Lyle Dighton's insight:

Deaths due to occupational related duties can be avoided if effective safety guidelines and education are implemented within companies and businesses.

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Garth Jacobs's curator insight, March 9, 2014 9:01 PM

This ties into the comments I made before about not only making construction workplaces safer but also educating people about the risks in their environment as well as tracking population statistics to find the actual cause so it can be addressed. I realize the laws are different here in Australia but if that had happened here and someone died, the regulator would be looking to have someone do time. I think from an OHS point of view we want to move forward not backwards. I see issues like this starting to arise in Australia more frequently if we say go backwards with out safety standards.

lee matthews's curator insight, March 15, 2017 6:07 AM
Wow.... Everybody needs to see this!! A young man dies on the worksite because he was a little out of his depth. But could it have been that he was to scared to raise his hand and say he is out of his depth through fear of retaining his job. I see one of the main preventative issues in this case being access to correct on the job training for workers, that is not out sourced at tremendous cost to the individual worker. Especially in the case of heavy machinery as outlined in this article. It states that Mr Tallent was driving a  front end loader without a licence or permit when he struck the power lines. This situation could be viewed as Mr Tallents negligence for not informing his boss of his untrained status, as it could also be seen as Mr Tallants bosses fault for not requesting to see his licence or asking if he had operated the item of plant before.

But...... could it be that a lack of on the job training has resulted in a loss of skilled machine operators? Thus forcing Mr Tallents employer to turn a blind eye in order to get the job done?  After all who is to say that Mr Tallent could have afforded the cost of "out of house" training, on the loose promise that after it he "may" gain employment? Is this why there is such a shortage of operators? This is a powerful article that only makes me ask more questions




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Mining Safety | Noise-induced hearing loss protection and Mining Safety

Mining Safety | Noise-induced hearing loss protection and Mining Safety | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it
Mining Safety health, tips, education, information and advice (Noise-induced hearing loss protection and Mining Safety http://t.co/Npn0ZxdH...)...
Lyle Dighton's insight:

A visual indicator as to the noise hazards which exist in mining operations. The diagram compares occupational and non - occupational noise levels to compare how noise producers compare with each other. A diagram like the one in the article is a good representation of OHS facts and figures.  

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Tom Lewis's curator insight, March 12, 2014 10:21 PM

There are many precautions that can be taken to prevent hearing damage in the mining industry. Complying with hearing PPE requirements such as ear plugs and ear muffs will limit noise as a hazard. The mine site is full of noisy equipment and as with anything prevention is better than cure.    

Nick Maidment's OHS Quest's curator insight, June 11, 2014 6:02 AM

Its all too often forgotten that we can't regain our hearing once its lost. Remember to look after your ears and your fellow work mates.

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The Risks Of Working In The Mining Industry

The Risks Of Working In The Mining Industry | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it
Despite all the advancements in safety and warning systems, the mining industry is still inherently dangerous. Many significant mining disasters have occurred in recent memory.

Via Martin Li
Lyle Dighton's insight:

This article reiterates the importance of occupational health and safety practices within the mining industry. Further advancements in mining would suggest an ongoing approach in ensuring the safety of personnel is maintained at all times.

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Hearing Loss Prevention Infographic

Hearing Loss Prevention Infographic | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it

May is Better Hearing and Speech Month here in the USA, and MayMonth in Canada!


Via LinguaHealth
Lyle Dighton's insight:

The article details how different environmental aspects affect hearing, and from where the highest levels of noise originate. The article includes a useful poster\diagram to assist the reader in understanding how excess noise can damage hearing.

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Reversing Hearing Loss?

Reversing Hearing Loss? | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it

Can hearing loss really be reversed? Apparently it can, depending on the cause. So what causes hearing loss and what can be done to reverse it?


Via williamdunn66
Lyle Dighton's insight:

This article reveals some preventative measures regarding hearing loss. Several methods are mentioned from simple home remedies, to over the counter medication to assist in optimum ear health.

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Cutting Out Hazards

Cutting Out Hazards | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it

The industry of mens hairdressing or 'barbering' is a growing insitution, with over 50 specialised stores trading within the South East Queensland area.

 

Ash Leveski, an employee of Phat Cutz Barbershop in the Brisbane suburb of Logan Central, details how his place of business is at risk of a potential hazard which is easily spread; "from our college education, we are taught about the hazards which can exist within our working environment. The hazard which we are most cautious of is the threat of head lice and transference."

 

Head lice is a small parasite which attaches itself to human hair, feeding off blood supplies found in the scalp region and causing irritation (Buxton 1947). If left untreated, lice can continue to breed and lay eggs, which can be transfered from person to person.

 

To combat this hazard, Ash has appropriated a health and safety action plan which is followed by all business personnel. The action plan details measures of head lice prevention; including thorough checking of client's hair prior to cutting and available head lice treatments, which can be purchased in store.

 

While the plans of action are assisting to remove some of the head lice risks which are present in his store, Ash further states that "head lice  control is a difficult process, and requires all members of the community to be aware that if they are noticing any scalp irritations, to consult a medical professional immediatley."

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Safety In The Music Industry

Safety In The Music Industry | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it

The roar from the crowd, the raising of the stage lights, the stage is all ready to rock. It's showtime and business as usual for Mr. Tim Wedel, drummer and song writer for Brisbane band 'The Construct'.

 

"I really enjoy playing and writing music" Mr. Wedel, 26, says about his musical career. "The rush you get from playing in front of a large crowd cannot be matched, and I would love to continue with the band for many years to come."

 

The band has played various shows and festivals through its relatively short career, and places a sonic emphasis on high levels of volume throughout a performance. High volumes of noise are a recognised hazard, and are outlined alongside precautionary recommendations within the  Environmental Protection (Noise) Regulations 1997.

 

When asked about which precautionary measures he takes during his musical endeavours, Mr. Wedel explains; "Probably not the precautions I should use. I am aware of ear protection to use during loud performances, but I find that this can impede on my ability to hear my other band mates playing."

 

The Noise Regulations act states that 'exposure to noise at measurement of 85 decibels or more, over an eight hour time period, will increase the risk of suffering pernament hearing loss' (Environmental Protection Regulations, 1997).

 

Further education for Mr. Wedel and his band mates will be suggested as a method for preventing any potential hearing injuries from occuring into the future. 

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Hazards and Risks at the Supermarket

Hazards and Risks at the Supermarket | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it

Risks and hazards are a prominent occurance in all workplaces, affecting working personnel partaking in occupational duties.

 

Phil Lock, 25, an employee of supermarket chain Coles Murrumba Downs in Queenslands south east, reveals how hazard awareness and prevention is a crucial process for Coles workers; "I started working for Coles about 8 years ago now, and our supervisiors are continually providing training for us regarding workplace hazard prevention."

 

Supermarket safety in Australia focuses on risk assessment concerning such potential hazards as heavy lifting of stock and food quality control (Government of Western Australia, 2011). Coles Group Australia maintains the safety and wellbeing of its employees, assisted by a formulated safety policy. The details of the policy include the introduction to 'SafetyCARE', a devised safety system used to maintain a safe working environment (Coles Group, 2014) 

 

Phil further elaborates on his job responsibilities; "A major role of my job as a senior Coles employee is to ensure personal safety, and the safety of those around me, is properly maintained at all times. By ensuring that I am monitoring possible risks in store, and keeping up to date with workplace health and safety procedures, I am able to perform my job without any major concerns for my wellbeing."

 

 

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Sarvena Arrasappan's curator insight, March 25, 2015 4:12 AM

Shops, supermarkets and stores are part of the retail sector, which employs, a large proportion of young people,especially students still attending school or university. Because it is a major employer of young, inexperienced workers, and because staff change rapidly (meaning that many workers will be new to the job), attention to health and safety is particularly important.
I have chosen this particular review as I could find myself relating to it. I have also worked at a supermarket that takes personal health and safety very seriously.  Something as simple as violence from customers or lifting heavy loads are considered as hazards to the employee.

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NSW Mining OHS: What does health & safety mean to me? - YouTube

There's nothing more important to come out of a mine than our miners. That's why health and safety is the top priority in NSW Mining, which has a world class...

Via Jayde Dwight
Lyle Dighton's insight:

Videos such as this contain a relevant viewpoint, as the people featured are workers in the mining industry and have knowledge on the operative processes involved in achieving effective health and safety prevention.

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Jayde Dwight's curator insight, March 3, 2014 10:28 PM

Excellent short video that shows REAL mining workers and their perspective on why health and safety is important to them. 

Mark Brodie's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:23 PM

Videos such as this contain a relevant viewpoint, as the people featured are workers in the mining industry and have knowledge on the operative processes involved in achieving effective health and safety prevention.

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WorkSafe - Skeletons 'Workers'

WorkSafe's advertising campaign highlighting preventable musculoskeletal injuries. These injuries can occur suddenly as the result of a single event, eg a sp...

Via Rachel Stronach
Lyle Dighton's insight:

Awareness campaigns such as this one can be hit and miss. The graphic portrayal in this video is accurate, but its effectiveness in engaging an audience could be ineffective.

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Rachel Stronach's curator insight, March 1, 2014 3:10 AM

This is a little gruesome but it is reality. Not following a policy can result in injuries.

Lee P Smith's curator insight, March 24, 2015 6:01 PM

I chose this scoop because I thought it was a great advertising campaign for preventable musculoskeletal injuries.

The factual, logical statement of “ there’s the risky way and there’s the right way” brings attention to “choice” and hopefully makes people think.

It also highlights human error like forgetting and is an actual reflection of basic human nature. 

Jordy Shivnen's curator insight, March 15, 2017 12:23 AM

The WorkSafe (2009) media campaign gives great insight into the physical psychological and social consequences and repercussions when taking "short cuts" at work. Hurting your back or breaking a limb might not happen every time, but taking shortcuts increases the risk of injury. Work places have a Job Safety Analysis (JSA) to prevent situations like this happening.

I chose evaluate this video because at a personal level I can relate to the thought processes of wanting to take short cuts.

I am passionate about working in this area as I would like to investigate the psychological reasons as to why workers take short cuts. In the next 5 years I would also like to propose training methods that allow for efficient work practices that don't involve "short cuts'.

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New mining health and safety centre launching

New mining health and safety centre launching | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it
The Newcastle Institute of Energy and Resources (NIER) has launched a new Centre of Resources Health and Safety.

Via Elaina Carter
Lyle Dighton's insight:

Centres such as the one mentioned in the article are an effective method of assisting OHS professionals in achieving successful outcomes. Hazard and control prevention could be made more effective as thoughts and ideas are able to come together where previously it may have not been possible.

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Elaina Carter's curator insight, March 14, 2014 5:49 AM

An interesting concept. It will be interesting to see how this Centre progresses and whether or not it will be successful. Definitely one to watch in my opinion. 

 

"This Centre will be unique. It extends the traditional concept of resources health and safety from delivering benefit to people working in the industry, to the communities and economies that rely on mining and resources."

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Dirtiest Oil: Why In Situ Bitumen Extraction Is Dangerous for Canada, the World | Truth-Out.org

Dirtiest Oil: Why In Situ Bitumen Extraction Is Dangerous for Canada, the World | Truth-Out.org | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it

A recent incident at the Primrose oil sands project near Cold Lake, Alberta - operated by Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. (CNRL) - is a case study of the threat of voracious oil extraction within an unfettered petrostate.

 

In July, CNRL's in situ mining operation near the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range experienced a massive underground oil blowout that has leaked more than 1.5 million liters of bitumen (heavy crude) emulsion. Oozing and percolating from the surface, the leak has polluted surrounding wetlands, forests and muskeg, as well as the traditional lands of the Beaver Lake Cree and Cold Lake First Nations.

 

The full extent of the Primrose leak is not yet known. Unlike a pipeline rupture, where leaks are readily detected and measured, it is nearly impossible to monitor the scope of an underground spill in real time. The spread of bitumen emulsion through subsoil as it threatens reservoirs and expansive swaths of wilderness is difficult to track from the surface. Oil from the Primose leak already has enveloped sacred gravesites and hunting land of the Beaver Lake Cree.

 

Alberta Environment reports that four distinct bitumen releases have been identified at Cold Lake. One was caused by a fissure at the bottom of a small, unnamed lake that has since been drained to mitigate long-term damage to wetland and amphibian life. Damage to the caprock at this site has allowed bitumen leakages to contaminate aquifers and groundwater.

 

As pressurized steam technologies gain traction in Alberta - there are 122 sites in the province - the safety of in situ mining technologies has been called into question. First Nations communities whose lands are threatened by leakages have been at the forefront of demands to end environmentally dangerous practices.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Jukka Melaranta
Lyle Dighton's insight:

This article presents a valid report on the environmental detriments of mining specific resources. Occupational health and safety professionals would seek to implement precautionary strategies to ensure exposure to poisonous materials are monitored and protective equipment is made available.

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Eye-tracking system monitors driver fatigue, prevents sleeping at wheel (Wired UK)

Eye-tracking system monitors driver fatigue, prevents sleeping at wheel (Wired UK) | Mining Industry and OHS | Scoop.it
An Australian company called Seeing Machines has developed eye-tracking technology that tackles one of the biggest safety issues in the mining and construction industries: driver fatigue (Eye-tracking system monitors driver fatigue, prevents sleeping...

Via Alex Andres
Lyle Dighton's insight:

Fatigue is a major detriment to workers within the mining industry. With new and improved technology, it will be interesting to see how eye tracking technology will prevent any possible accidents from occuring. 

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