Mindsets
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Why You Should Be Emphasizing Effort to Empower Learning

Why You Should Be Emphasizing Effort to Empower Learning | Mindsets | Scoop.it

Carol Dweck’s well-known research found that teachers whose comments emphasized effort-result relationships had students learning up to 50% more than students of teachers who did not direct attention to effort-result relationships.


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How to Really Praise Employees

How to Really Praise Employees | Mindsets | Scoop.it
Don't just say, 'Nice work!' Psychologist Carole Dweck emphasizes the need to compliment the specific effort employees put in.
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Praising Effort Prepares Children To Tackle Challenges

Praising Effort Prepares Children To Tackle Challenges | Mindsets | Scoop.it

"Praising toddlers’ effort, not talent, leads to greater motivation and more positive attitudes about challenges later on, say psychologists. We think our babies are so smart, so amazing, so good. But please, say the researchers, don’t tell them that. ''It’s better to focus on effort and the action your baby is doing. ‘You worked hard on that’ versus ‘you’re so good at that,’' says Carol S. Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford University. In a new study, the team found that the kind of praise parents give their babies and toddlers influences the child’s motivation later on. It also plays a role in children’s beliefs about themselves and their desire to take on challenges years later." | via Futurity


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Giving Good Praise to Girls: What Messages Stick | MindShift

Giving Good Praise to Girls: What Messages Stick | MindShift | Mindsets | Scoop.it
How to praise kids: It's a hot topic for many parents and educators. A lot of the conversation around it has stemmed from studies by Carol Dweck, professor o

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Classroom Strategies to Foster a Growth Mindset

Classroom Strategies to Foster a Growth Mindset | Mindsets | Scoop.it
Blogger and educator Larry Ferlazzo partners with Carol Dweck, Ph.D. and Lisa Sorich Blackwell, Ph.D in this article.

This blog post is re-posted from Larry Ferlazzo's blog.

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Discovering How to Learn Smarter~ Carol Dweck's Brainology

Discovering How to Learn Smarter~ Carol Dweck's Brainology | Mindsets | Scoop.it

This article is about how teachers in many schools in the D.C. area are foregoing empty praise of the “Good job!” variety, in favor of giving students solid information that will do them some real good. That information concerns how their brains work and how their intelligence and skills develop, and it’s knowledge that should be made available to every child in the country. Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck conducted the groundbreaking research showing that praise intended to raise young people’s self-esteem can seriously backfire.


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The Inverse Power of Praise: How Not to Talk to Your Kids

The Inverse Power of Praise: How Not to Talk to Your Kids | Mindsets | Scoop.it

"Why are children who are measurably at the very top of the charts, lack confindence about his ability to tackly routine school challenges? The inverse power of praise. For a few decades, it’s been noted that a large percentage of all gifted students (those who score in the top 10 percent on aptitude tests) severely underestimate their own abilities. Those afflicted with this lack of perceived competence adopt lower standards for success and expect less of themselves. They underrate the importance of effort, and they overrate how much help they need from a parent. For the past ten years, psychologist Carol Dweck and her team at Columbia (she’s now at Stanford) studied the effect of praise on students in a dozen New York schools. Her seminal work—a series of experiments on 400 fifth-graders—paints the picture most clearly of praises' unintended consequences." | via New York Magazine


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5 Ways To Conquer Your Fear Of Failure - Forbes

5 Ways To Conquer Your Fear Of Failure - Forbes | Mindsets | Scoop.it
by Becky Ryan Failure isn’t holding you back: fear of failure is. We’re conditioned to fear failure, as if lack of failure guarantees success. The reality is that lack of failure equals lack of risk-taking, which is required for meaningful success.

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Getting Into The Right Mindset For Better Learning

Getting Into The Right Mindset For Better Learning | Mindsets | Scoop.it

"I hadn’t heard of this learning theory and finding this drew me into performing a couple of quick searches to get a bit of background information on the Fixed v Growth Mindset research. Originating from Stanford University psychologist/researcher Carol Dweck, its premise (from my initial reflection) is that as learners, we can either improve our intelligence through hard work or that we are born with a skill set and intelligence level that we are stuck with. What makes this powerful to consider as teachers ( and parents) is that we need to reflect on how much impact we can have on the learning and lives of our children. If we resign ourselves, which I have done often in my 25 years as a teacher so I’m not ‘absolving myself from sin’, that there is not much we can do for some students because they are 'just like the rest of their family', we are not doing our job. If we look at underachievers and their test scores and accept that they will forever be underachievers – or if we allow them to accept their position in life without making the effort – we have failed in our duties." | by Mark Gleeson

 


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Getting into the right mindset for better learning

Getting into the right mindset for better learning | Mindsets | Scoop.it

Mark Gleeson once again provides insight into an infographic. This one on fixed vs growth mindset. In this post he states "Originating from Stanford University psychologist/researcher Carol Dweck, its premise (from my initial reflection) is that as learners, we can either improve our intelligence through hard work or that we are born with a skill set and intelligence level that we are stuck with."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 7, 2013 8:58 AM

What do you think? Do your students come to you with a fixed mindset? Is there future pre-determined by birth? Is intelligence static? Or do you students come in with a growth mindset, with the knowledge that learning takes effort and time, the ability to try and fail, and try again (and again...)? Can intelligence be developed?

Gleeson provides an overview of the two mindsets and explores the infographic and the five categories within in it by asking each as a question. Below is one example...but you will find questins for each category in the post (challenges, obstacles, effort, criticism, success of others).

Quoting from the post:

OBSTACLES: Do we allow our children/ourselves to give up when learning becomes too difficult and stay in a growth- limiting ‘comfort zone’? OR Do we expect our childen/ourselves to persist until we overcome those obstacles and celebrate the achievement of success against all odds?And if you would like to watch a short video that discusses fixed mindset check out this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhLJPhxuvGM.

Mary Cunningham's curator insight, April 7, 2013 12:54 PM

This fits really well with the SIM work that has been happening!  It is a nice visual representation of the Dwek work.

 

Jaimee's curator insight, March 5, 2014 10:06 AM

People/Students do not go for the challenges because they are scared of failure. With failure come consequences fro example low grades. Anyone can say the grade doesn't matter  it is what you learned, however without the grade you can lose out on getting accepted into colleges or fail a class. 

 

This article is about  about how one can reach success by having a growth mindset.  By gaining and having the drive to gain more knowledge.