Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future
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Reports

Reports | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it

The World Economic Forum publishes a comprehensive series of reports which examine in detail the broad range of global issues it seeks to address with stakeholders as part of its mission of improving the state of the world. Besides reports on its key events and standalone publications such as the Global Competitiveness Report, the Global Risks Report and the Global Gender Gap Report, the Forum produces landmark titles covering the environment, education, individual industries and technologies.

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Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future
While a lot can be said about the achievements and developments of humanity thus so far, a lot can also be said about the flaws and shortcomings that have arisen along the way. The human brain, the human mind and collectively human nature are products of evolutionary biology and the socio-cultural environment, both processes are relatively slow.
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How to “Make” a Woman – The Future of Flesh –

An important and interesting read, not just about sex robots, but gender bias and what we need to consider in regard to AI/robots
" ..
It’s not particularly surprising that 38 percent of these men have taboo fantasies that they can’t fulfill with a human partner (or that 20 percent just really love cool new technology). It’s not even particularly unusual that 30 percent are just shy or lonely. But one in 10 respondents said they would date a realistic AI sex robot in order to have a “more intelligent” partner. Even more worrisome are the 15 percent who want a partner “who would never let [him] down” or the 15 percent who want a partner who is “never sad or upset.” One in five responded that they need “a partner that is always there to listen.” Baffling is the 17 percent who responded that they want a sex robot partner “with the same interests” as theirs."
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Why are we still taking diet advice from celebrities?

Why are we still taking diet advice from celebrities? | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it

Halo Effect - We project success in one area onto other areas, concluding that a person has expertise in an area that they do not.

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Women In Technology Leadership: A Fresh Look At Bias

Women In Technology Leadership: A Fresh Look At Bias | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
But there is one characteristic of Silicon Valley that does not seem to be changing ― the decidedly small number of women in leadership roles in tech companies
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How Social Media Makes Us Angry All the Time | Molly Crockett - YouTube

Social media has been, without a doubt, one of the biggest explosions in connectivity in human history. That's the good part. The bad part is that the minds of the people within these companies have manipulated users into an addictive cycle. You're already familiar with it: post content, receive rewards (likes, comments, etc). But the staggering of the rewards is the habit-forming part, and the reason most moderately heavy social media users check their apps or newsfeeds some 10-to-50 times a day. And to add to the problem — these algorithms have been strengthened to show you more and more outrageous content. It genuinely depletes your ability to be outraged by things in real life (for instance, a sexual predator for a President). Molly Crockett posits that we should all be aware of the dangers of these algorithms... and that we might have to start using them a lot less if we want to have a normal society back.
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Most Common Cognitive Biases Visualised & Explained

Most Common Cognitive Biases Visualised & Explained | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
There used to be a generic belief that humans are completely rational. It is easily understandable why a belief like this was popular. People want to think of themselves as rational because anything…

Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, November 22, 2017 4:07 AM
A very detailed article explaining the common biases we hold whenever we make decisions or meet new people. The article also explains what we can do to overcome those biases.
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A Yale psychologist's simple thought experiment temporarily turned conservatives into liberals

A Yale psychologist's simple thought experiment temporarily turned conservatives into liberals | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
A study by Yale psychology professor John Bargh suggests that making people feel safe from harm can change their stances on hot-button issues.
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Why Do Smart People Do Foolish Things?

Why Do Smart People Do Foolish Things? | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Is it better to be a critical thinker or to be intelligent? My latest research pitted critical thinking and intelligence against each other to see which was associated with fewer negative life events. People who were strong on either intelligence or critical thinking experienced fewer negative events, but critical thinkers did better.
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(3) Remembering and Forgetting - Crash Course Psychology #14 - YouTube

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Facts Don't Win Fights: Here’s How to Cut Through Confirmation Bias

Facts Don't Win Fights: Here’s How to Cut Through Confirmation Bias | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it

If you want someone to see an issue rationally, you just show them the facts, right? No one can refute a fact. Well, brain imaging and psychological studies are showing that, society wide, we may be on the wrong path by holding evidence up as an Ace card. Neuroscientist Tali Sharot and her colleagues have proven that reading the same set of facts polarizes groups of people even further, because of our in-built confirmation biases—something we all fall prey to, equally. In fact, Sharot cites research from Yale University that disproves the idea that the social divisions we are experiencing right now—over climate change, gun control, or vaccines—are somehow the result of an intelligence gap: smart people are just as illogical, and what's more, they are even more skilled at skewing data to align with their beliefs. So if facts aren't the way forward, what is? There is one thing that may help us swap the moral high ground for actual progress: finding common motives. Here, Sharot explains why identifying a shared goal is better than winning a fight.

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Molly Crockett on the Science of Morality

Molly Crockett on the Science of Morality | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it

"Q: You noted that current environmental factors, in addition to genetics and upbringing, can influence one’s experienced morality. In the context of politics specifically, how significant of a role do greater social trends play in influencing one’s personal morality? 


A: I’m so glad you asked that because it’s something that I’m obsessed with at the moment. I actually have a paper coming out on Monday exploring how social media might influence the experience and expression of moral outrage. So, the idea is that moral emotions evolved in a very particular context, a context of small group interactions. But, with new technologies, the nature of social interaction has dramatically changed. We’re interacting less face-to-face, with much larger groups of people in online social networks. It’s important to ask the question of how the structure of these networks and the nature of the interactions that take place in those networks actually change the relative costs and benefits of moral expression, punishment or empathy. I’m thinking a lot about these questions and we’re planning a lot of research in the lab to try to understand how different components of social interactions that might change when you go from offline to online actually could change the way that people engage morally and ultimately change the way that people form their moral opinions and judgments.@

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The Dangers of Cognitive Bias

The Dangers of Cognitive Bias | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
“Your best friends are the ones who give you the most brutal criticism.”
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Analysis | Why we fall for political spin

Analysis | Why we fall for political spin | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Cognitive biases can affect the way we perceive information, sometimes leading to irrational behavior and affecting our decision-making. Politicians, among others, know this and try to use these biases to win favor.
Take this quiz to learn more about these biases and how they might affect you
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Technology Is Biased Too. How Do We Fix It?

Technology Is Biased Too. How Do We Fix It? | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Algorithms were supposed to free us from our unconscious mistakes. But now there’s a new set of problems to solve.
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We view ourselves and those we care about through 'rose-tinted glasses', study says

We view ourselves and those we care about through 'rose-tinted glasses', study says | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it

The study, which is the first to show that such an 'optimism bias' extends beyond the self, found that people readily changed their beliefs about a person they like when receiving good news but barely changed their opinions about them after receiving bad news.

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Opinion | How to Counter the Circus of Pseudoscience

Opinion | How to Counter the Circus of Pseudoscience | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Alternative-health gurus harness the language of medicine to sound authoritative. Doctors and other scientists must push back.
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24 Cognitive Biases You Need To Stop Making [Infographic]

24 Cognitive Biases You Need To Stop Making [Infographic] | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Cognitive bias occurs when we make subjective assumptions about people or situations based on our own perception of reality. This can lead t
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Why do negotiations fail – the cognitive biases that affect human interactions

Why do negotiations fail – the cognitive biases that affect human interactions | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
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Find Out Which Cognitive Biases Alter Your Perspective 

Find Out Which Cognitive Biases Alter Your Perspective  | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Cognitive biases can change the way you see everything, and often in a bad way. Fortunately, just becoming aware of your biases can help you overcome them.
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Every Single Cognitive Bias in One Infographic

Every Single Cognitive Bias in One Infographic | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Here's all 188 cognitive biases in existence, grouped by how they impact our thoughts and actions. We also give some specific cognitive bias examples.
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9 Cognitive Biases You Didn't Know You Had

Your dumb brain is playing some truly devious tricks on you. Learn to look out for some of these sneaky, tricksy cognitive biases and it might just change the way you see the world.
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Turns Out Our Biases Really Are Stronger Than Our Ability to Perceive Facts

Turns Out Our Biases Really Are Stronger Than Our Ability to Perceive Facts | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it

"..some people won't change their minds, even when the evidence is staring them in the face."


Via Wildcat2030
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English's curator insight, September 7, 2017 1:11 AM
Share your insight
Dr Huey Allen's curator insight, September 8, 2017 9:22 AM

Yes, personal biases do affect leadership decisions!

Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, September 9, 2017 8:45 PM
Turns Out Our Biases Really Are Stronger Than Our Ability to Perceive Facts
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We Must Leave The Personal Out Of Bioethics - Conatus News

We Must Leave The Personal Out Of Bioethics - Conatus News | Why we need to change our mind - Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Bioethics is an emotionally charged topic; we must not let personal anecdotes and feelings get in the way of the potential to eradicate disease.
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We tested an economic theory by trying to buy people's Powerball tickets for much more than they paid

But to really test this, let’s make one choice clearly superior. We went outside and tried to buy lottery tickets from people for more than they paid. The rational choice, in this case, would always be to sell your ticket and buy more tickets or pocket the extra cash and replace your tickets. But people aren’t known to be rational.

Most people refused to sell us their tickets for twice what they paid. They were worried that they might be selling a winning ticket and that decision would be too much to bear.
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