Mike Dillen COM375 Portfolio
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Twitter - CMC language example

Everybody communicates differently. Most computer mediated communication is text based (Herring). However, there is an extremely high amount of variability in the text. People have the tendency to change how they speak (or write), depending on the medium of CMC. According to Herring's article, some modes of communication promote different types of professionalism in the wording. Another thing that shapes language use is the purpose of the communication. There are many others that shape language use. The participants experience, the structure of the communication (one-way, one-to-one, group messaging, etc.), regular social norms with that communication type, and discourse topic and activity type all have a strong influence on the language used.

 

My twitter account shows all of these influences. I've had some tweets that were for class that were more professional. I'd use proper punctuation and respectable language because I knew that I was being graded on the tweets. I would do this because that would be the social norm in submitting an assignment (along with having some common sense). The article continues to go on citing examples, such as "fun" topics frequently include some profanity. Whenever I use twitter for personal reasons, it's usually about something stupid and to make myself or my friends laugh, which some well-placed profanity can do. Interactional words can be demonstrated by asterisks on both sides, which is "surprisingly effective." A criticism of text-based CMC is that there are limitations in understanding. It is difficult to really capture the emotion or tone someone says something through text. There are alternative ways of trying to show this, like the interactional words and *doing this* but those can seem juvenile and unprofessional. I've always had trouble with this. I am an extremely sarcastic person, which is heavily reliant on tone and my facial expression... neither of which can be shown through text. As a result, a lot of people misunderstand what I say (like some of my tweets) and what isn't meant to be taken seriously, is. Readers may get the wrong impression of my message and completely misconstrue what I say. The type of language you use on the internet and the way you present it is regulated by a number of things, and still has its limitations.

 

Resources

 

http://www.let.rug.nl/redeker/herring.pdf

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Blogger - Modes of CMC - Web 2.0 example

Blogger is a site where anyone and everyone can create their own blog. All the blog posts come automatically formatted, and the users can change them how they wish. It is very, very easy to use. The way the program is set up is very similar to text programs on the computer, like Microsoft Word, in that it gives you the ability to change font type, sizes, colors, allows for alignment of text and makes it easy for the user to create lists. The author can control the privacy settings and allow only certain people to see it. People can comment on the blog.

 

This is an excellent example of the "Web 2.0" theory. The web is evolving, and there are more and more capabilities being created every day. According to the nonprofitorg blog, web 2.0 consists of blogs, wikis, and social networking sites. The main focus is that with these sites, the authors of the page can publish "content to many on social networking sites who then re-publish your content to their friends, fans, followers, connections, etc." This is what a blog is for. Whatever topic the blog is written on, there can be followers who find the topic interesting, important, or relevant to their lives. The author puts information on the subject out there in the hopes that the readers will take it in. The users can give the author feedback through a comment section or a discussion board. That communication is not just one way, as any reader can comment on the author's blog OR any other comment from other readers. There is a great deal of freedom on blogs, fixated on the point that authors and readers can communicate back and forth, making it a fine example of Web 2.0.

 

Resources

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsNcjya56v8

 

http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/

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Facebook - Identity Development example

Facebook is a social network site where people create their own profiles. On this, they include things like schools, likes, dislikes, hobbies, favorite shows and movies, etc. They do not have to fill everything out, but can put in whatever they so choose. People do this to portray a certain image they want themselves to have, almost like an ideal self.  Some people hide things or choose to omit certain details about their lives if they believe it could hurt them in some way. On the other side, people also may highlight, emphasize or overexaggerate things that make them look good and are potentially helpful.

 

Elison, Heino, and Gibbs wrote an article on image management and self-promotion. After reading this, compared to most people, I feel like I do not do as much to maintain and watch over my image. As they said in the article, I "polish it up some, like we all probably do a little bit, but for the most part I would say people are fairly straightforward." This is true. Most people do some sort of upkeep on their page to "maximize the benefits and minimize risks". I've listed my high school, college, hometown, and current residence. I've included my favorite bands and TV shows. I've made all my photos private. For whatever reason, I'm friends with some people who I would not want to see all my pictures and photos, so I make them private. I figure the important or relevant people in my life will see them at some point anyways, or if I feel like they really need to see a picture, I can show them myself. There is not much about myself I would want to change, but I could try and represent whatever changes I want through Facebook. Right now, my profile accurately represents my "real self" which is pretty much the same as my "ideal self" in that most things I want to be are represented through my profile.

 

Resources

 

http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol11/issue2/ellison.html

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Facebook - Community Building example

Facebook is a very useful tool for community building. Anybody can make a profile and list anything and everything about themselves. They can put their hometown, high school, college, work, and even more. You can fill in your favorite TV shows, movies, music, and books. All of these have their own page, that is linked to other people who have the same listed.

 

Ellison, Steinfeld, and Camp wrote a piece on community building and how Facebook is so helpful. Every person can gain social capital from their page. The majority of people often use it to connect with offline contacts; people who you are unable or unwilling to speak to in person, over the phone, etc. You know that they check their profiles, so you know they will get your message, either through their inbox or a wall post. The higher social capital is just through connections. The authours point out that making new connections, or following through more often on present connections is possible. As far as making new connections go, you are able to link with people you otherwise have no contact with. I've done this with people I worked with, or classmates. Sometimes if a friend has lost their cell phone, facebook is the only way to talk to them. The authors of the article list "bonding" as something that happens through Facebook. Posting on someone's wall, while it is public to everyone else (depending on privacy setting), is still fairly personal. It shows that you are interested in speaking to that specific person about whatever issue or thing you have.

 

The amount of social capital you can have from your profile is determined how relevant everything is to your real life. If you have 400 friends from college, including a number of professional contacts from the school, that should be very good for your social capital. If you move across the country, those contacts probably won't matter or be very helpful. If everything you are connected to is in your community, you're golden.

 

Resources

 

http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/ellison.html

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Twitter - Informal CMC example

Twitter - Informal CMC example | Mike Dillen COM375 Portfolio | Scoop.it

Twitter is often used very informally. After being required to create my own Twitter account, aside from the tweets mandatory in COM375 class, I've used it for personal social reasons as well. These are usually tweets to or about my friends, or re-tweeting their own tweets. The majority of times, this is done to create humor at the expense of one of my friends. The hash tags are usually used to categorize and organize tweets, but amongst friends just use it informally as another way of making a joke, not taking the real purpose of hashtags seriously. As an example, I always see a friend of mine wearing the same flannel shirt. I tweeted at him "nice flannel #haventbeenshoppingsincemiddleschool", joking at his lack of wardrobe. I obviously didn't seriously consider "havent been shopping since middle school" a real category or topic, nor do I expect someone to search for that on Google, hoping to find that.

 

The idea of formality in CMC was addressed the Hrastinski article. In the article, he described informal communication as unscheduled and interactive. It has an unarranged agenda, random participants, and obviously uses informal (slang) language. This perfectly describes how I use Twitter. I never plan my tweets ahead of time; I just sign on and tweet whatever I find to be funny at that moment. It's entirely random, or an "unarranged agenda." I never know who I'm going to tweet about or two, and usually use informal language in the form of an inside joke between myself and that person.

 

Resources

 

http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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Group Project on LinkedIn - Web 1.0 example

Group Project on LinkedIn - Web 1.0 example | Mike Dillen COM375 Portfolio | Scoop.it

The group project we were assigned could be published on any platform. We used Scoop It, essentially a template to create your own personal webpage. The site has many capabilities that enable a novice computer user to publish a professional-looking webpage.

 

The main idea of Web 1.0 is that it is the most basic type of information posted on the internet. It's how every webpage was, when the internet was just created. Very watered down and content-focused. There's not a lot of flashiness; the page was made to get the content out into the world, that's it. When we worked on the group project, we had that in mind. There did not need to be any flash and we did not want it to be especially eye-catching. The content was our focus. The page is one-way communication; there is no back and forth interaction between myself (the author) and other people. The author is "solely responsible  for updating users and managing the content of the website."

 

When we had started the project, we knew the content was the most important aspect. Flashiness might be more appealing to the eye, but would take away from the purpose of the site. Random videos to catch someone's attention could be distracting, and might put the reader's attention at something we, as the authors, did not care for them to see. Getting our message across was the most important thing, and because of the flash-limitations of Web 1.0 pages, it was very easy to make the page content-oriented.

Resources

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_1.0

 

http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/

 

http://web-updates.avenuesnepal.com/web-10-vs-web-20/

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Facebook - Modes of CMC - Web 3.0 example

Facebook is a great example of Web 3.0 because there is so much information the program has, based on your profile. When filling out the most basic information, people AND the internet can learn a lot about you. In the EPN video clip, they mentioned that the big aspect of Web 3.0 is that the "sites are in a continuous learning process and anticipate what the users like, or dislike." On Web 3.0, the internet is "a web of appliances that communicate with each other by exchanging information." Facebook is an example of this. If you fill out your favorite bands, Facebook will suggest some other bands that you might like. Facebook gets these suggested bands from ones that are similar to the ones you listed, or ones that other people with similar interests like. The same goes for TV shows, movies, etc. Facebook is using the information you listed on your profile as a way to build more and more potential connections. Aside from the interests listed, Facebook also always has sponsored advertisements on the side of pages. Many of these advertisements are, again, things that are related to your personal information. Most of the times I see advertisements, they are telling me to buy a ticket to my favorite band's concert, to buy tickets to a sporting event near my hometown, and telling me just about any other entertainment news at my location. As I am writing this out, the advertisement on the side my Facebook page is something about the TV channel "Showtime", as a couple of my favorite shows listed are on that channel. It is a great example of web 3.0 because the internet itself is learning, and providing me with relevant content. Another word for it used in the EPN clip is "semantic web", in which the web evolves itself into an intelligent environment.

 

Resources

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsNcjya56v8

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Group Project on LinkedIn - Formal CMC example

Group Project on LinkedIn - Formal CMC example | Mike Dillen COM375 Portfolio | Scoop.it

The group project we did is an example of formal computer mediated communication. In the project we had to pick one aspect of computer mediated communication, and my group chose LinkedIn. The content of the presentation could be anything. We included the how to create a LinkedIn account, the benefits of having an account, how to connect with Ualbany alumni and students, and examples proving how the site can help a worker. The idea of formality is addressed in an article by Stefan Hrastinski.

 

Under his definition, formal communication is scheduled, one-way, has a preset agenda, is mandatory and authority-organized, is content-focused, and uses formal language. This project fits all of those descriptions. The project was scheduled and planned, months ahead of time. It took time to schedule and complete all the aspects of the project we had to complete. Communication is one way, as our project wound up being an informational page on LinkedIn. There is no discussion board, just the information. The page was content-focused. There were little-to-no gimmicks or things to grab attention; it was purely based on the content. What you see is what you get. As a group, we figured that the information we provided was more than enough to get our point across. It was so helpful, we didn't need bright pictures or flashy videos. The page uses very formal language and is made to appeal to professionals. As a group, we had planned to get this page on the career services website, so it was necessary for us to be very serious and formal.

 

Resources

 

http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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Delicious - Filtering/Curating example

Delicious - Filtering/Curating example | Mike Dillen COM375 Portfolio | Scoop.it

Delicious is a great example of filtering and curating. On each individual page, users are to put up a bunch of links they consider interesting or news-worth, or could just be something they want to share. With each link, users put up a number of tags to go along with the link. This way when anybody will search on Google or any other search engine, the link may come up based on their keyword search (if the searched word was one of their tags). We were given an assignment in class to find a number of different sources and their definition of the word "culture". On my user account page, we were to stack up all the links and their definition of culture. On each link, we put up a bunch of tags to go along with the information.

 

According to Masullo-Chen's article on filtering and curating, the tags main purpose is to help sort and organize content. Upon each link, I would put up a couple of tags to help sort the information, such as "culture" for the definition, and "com375" so other class members would be able to find my links much easier. The only people I wanted to find my links were other class members, and it was highly doubtful random people would include "com375" in their search. This way I could sort all the content, and control who I had wanted to see it. Another aspect which is a great example of curating is that the users on Delicious can create stacks. According to Gorman's article, one of the most beneficial parts of curating is that even if you have tons of tons of links, you can organize the relevant ones together. On Delicious, you can create "stacks" and put everything relevant to one idea or topic in the same stack. I created a "culture" stack and put all the culture-defining links in that stack. If I were to put up links on a completely different topic, I would create a new, separate stack. Delicious is an incredible example of filtering and curating.

 

Resources

 

http://savethemedia.com/2011/03/04/howtousetwitterhashtag/

 

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2011/04/social-media-curation-tool-separates-news-from-noise.html

 



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Twitter - Networking example

Twitter is an extraordinary example of networking. After you create a profile, all of the great features of Twitter are available to you. From your profile, you can post personal opinions or things you find interesting. You can follow other people, whether they are friends, public figures, news websites, sports teams, etc. Anything that is important to you, or you are interested in, you can follow. Other people can follow you for the same reasons. Among all these posts, they can be "tagged" with certain topics or interests, so people can search for them or find them easier. Twitter makes it very easy to organize stories and opinions.

 

In the Boyd-Ellison article on Social Network History, they talk about how all of this is possible. They point out that not only are you able to connect with complete strangers you have never seen before, but users can also "articulate and make visible their social networks", if they want to. As Boyd and Ellison said, on just about every social network site you can make your profile as private or as public as you want, controlling who you want to see your profile and access the information on it.

 

Resources

 

http://www.danah.org/papers/JCMCIntro.pdf

 

 

 

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