middle school geography education
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The 10 Worst River Basins Contributing to Ocean Plastics

The 10 Worst River Basins Contributing to Ocean Plastics | middle school geography education | Scoop.it

"[A new paper], published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, calculates that rivers contribute between 410,000 and 4 million tonnes a year to oceanic plastic debris, with 88 to 95% [of that total] coming from only 10. Those rivers are the Yangtze, Yellow, Hai He, Pearl, Amur and Mekong in east Asia, the Indus and Ganges Delta in south Asia, and the Niger and Nile in Africa."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 2017 8:09 PM

Of river-based plastic pollution, these 10 rivers are responsible for 88%-95% of all the plastic gyrating in the world's oceans.  Improvement in these key places could make a world of difference in improving marine ecosystems (NOTE: the map came from this alternative article on the same subject).

 

Tags: pollution, water, environmentsustainability, consumption, fluvial.

Matt Richardson's curator insight, January 3, 1:22 PM
Baltimore harbor has an odd contraption that is scooping plastic out of Jones Falls before it reaches the outer harbor. If only this machine could operate in these 10 river systems, which are contributing waste to our embattled/trashed/overfished/warming oceans. .
Matt Manish's curator insight, April 4, 12:44 PM
It struck me as odd to learn that the majority of plastic that winds up in the ocean isn't actually from ocean activities. Also, that these ten rivers contribute up to 88 to 95% of plastics in the ocean. This is a huge margin of these materials coming from these ten major river systems, most of them being in Asia. This makes me wonder why are mostly Asia's rivers carrying so much trash to ocean. It could be the major cities sitting along the banks that are dumping trash into the river and letting float down steam. Also, I wonder if there possibly isn't an efficient enough sanitation system set up in Asia which could lead to more people just throwing their trash into these rivers. To summarize, something from the data in this article tells me that their is a common denominator as to why most of the rivers that carry the largest amount of plastic materials to the ocean every year are located in Asia.
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Humanizing the Economy - P2P Foundation

Humanizing the Economy - P2P Foundation | middle school geography education | Scoop.it

"Alternatives do exist. The effort to construct economic systems with a more human face has been attempted since the dawn of the industrial age. And the impact of these attempts on capitalism has been decisive in making our own market system more humane. For the task has been not only to construct a more humane alternative to the free market model, but also to humanize the model we do have.

 
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A Tale of Two Cows - An Infographic on various socio-economic systems

A Tale of Two Cows - An Infographic on various socio-economic systems | middle school geography education | Scoop.it
This infographic uses two cows as a medium for explaining the various types of socio-economic systems.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Rescooped by Patti Cwodzinski from Geography Education
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Scale of the Universe

Scale of the Universe | middle school geography education | Scoop.it
Everything in the known universe, created by 14-year-old twins.

 

After you follow the link, click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe).  This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels.   This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.  See this on the twins website at: http://htwins.net/scale2/


Via Seth Dixon
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Stan Jones's comment, September 5, 2012 11:29 AM
This was a pretty cool layout/presentation. But I really had no idea of what the major point that was trying to be explained. Really cool tool to use though.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, September 5, 2012 11:31 AM
It is very interesting to view the size comparison of the earth to multiple other things. This is a great visual representation to demonstrate just exactly the meaning of scale. This application if almost similar to the overlapping map application. Very useful tool to use in a classroom to demonstrate the concept of scale.
Seth Dixon's comment, September 5, 2012 12:11 PM
This is an incredible way to visualize the atom and the universe.
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The Names Behind The States

The Names Behind The States | middle school geography education | Scoop.it

An infographic of the etymology and cultural origins of the names that made the United States of America.


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Seth Dixon's comment, May 6, 2013 3:21 PM
@Carly, Texas is also inaccurate...
Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:52 PM

The Names Behind The States | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Aulde de Barbuat's comment, May 18, 2013 7:08 AM
quite interesting, thanks. Unhappily, the link seems broken..Do you happen to have another one?
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Sprawling Shanghai

Sprawling Shanghai | middle school geography education | Scoop.it
If you could go back in time to the 1980s, you would find a city that is drastically different than today’s Shanghai.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 20, 2017 5:20 PM

This series of seven satellite images shows how quickly the economic development of China has impacted the urban sprawl of China's biggest cities.  Pictures of the downtown area's growth are impressive, but these aerial images show the full magnitude of the change. 

 

Tags: urbanremote sensing, megacities, China, urban ecology.

Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 2017 10:17 AM
Unit 7 - Urban Sprawl 
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 10:12 PM
Shanghai os growing at an incredibly rapid rate. As more and more people begin to inhabit the city, the neighboring towns have morphed into one large city. However, the city's amazing population increase has taken a toll on its ecosystem. With the rapid growth, Shanghai's temperature has increased dramatically. Similarly, the wild and plant life has declined in the region as well.
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Empathy, democracy and the economy | openDemocracy

Empathy, democracy and the economy | openDemocracy | middle school geography education | Scoop.it

At present, our economic systems afford us only the narrowest view of human potential. They deny us the ability to see people for what they truly are. We define others not by what they have but by what they lack. Rather than examine what they can offer, we categorize vast swaths of our society by what they need. And the harm that is done to others through poverty, inequality and pollution is dismissed as a trade-off against economic efficiency and growth. Ifempathy is the ability to understand the perspectives of others and use that understanding to guide one’s actions, then it’s safe to conclude that our current economies inculcate the opposite.

 

What would change if the economy was re-structured with empathy at the center? 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Our Place in the World

Our Place in the World | middle school geography education | Scoop.it

Tags: scale, K12, location. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:21 AM

As I am almost finished with my teacher degree I always look for great ideas that will help the students I will teach some day. This will be great for kids to get the concept of location and scale.  Scale is critical to know where something is, This is a great frame of reference.  

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:48 AM

An easy way to understand scale and location.

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Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate

Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | middle school geography education | Scoop.it
More than 600 newcomers per day have arrived in Canada since 2006, and many of them have settled in neighbourhoods like Richmond, B.C.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 2014 1:15 PM

This article contains details about the Canadian immigrant population boom, mostly from east Asia, which began in the 90's. Unsurprisingly, many of these immigrants settle into communities with others whom share their culture. These Canadian ethnic enclaves differ from those in the US because most immigrants are choosing suburban areas (where the cost of living is lower) rather than being relegated to an urban "ethnictown." However, these enclaves are not entirely a product of economic equality as the average earnings for a recent immigrant are only 61% of a Canadian-born worker, limiting their ability to move elsewhere.

 

Conversely, the immigrant communities which become economically successful are seeing many of their sons and daughters move away to the city or other suburbs as they are more fully integrated into the Canadian culture and if there is no influx of new immigrants into these enclaves they begin to die out. This seems to indicate that long-standing ethnic enclaves are at least partially the product of economic inequality than a desire to preserve culture.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 9:41 AM

This article was interesting because it showed how modern immigration patterns are not that dissimilar from historic patterns.  People come to a new country and they settle in an area that has relatives or familiar people already living there.  The formation of ethnic enclaves is the example.  People are choosing to self-segregate when they immigrate to a new homeland because it is the familiar with in the strange.  Perhaps once the new immigrants have acclimated to Canadian society they may move out of the enclave areas but they also may stay.  It is an interesting example of how people cluster together with similar people when they move to a new country.

Gubert's curator insight, February 11, 2015 5:17 AM

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